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Old 10-20-2012, 10:35 AM
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1949 F1 One Piece Fiberglass Front

Hi to all. I'm new to the forum but have been using the SEARCH button big time and learning alot about what awaits me. I purchased a 1949 F1 pickup which I thought was in pretty good condition. Turns out it was a pretty bad death trap if I planned on using it more than a few miles down the road or at over 20 MPH.

Anyway the restoration has begun and it's down to the frame. Just finished fabricating a new radiator mount and rerouting the transmission oil cooler lines. Today I'm removing all the wiring so I can replace and reroute everything. After we change the steering column and brake pedal system the Cab will be coming off. It's installed all crooked and tilted to the side. I'll also be converting it from pickup to a flat bed stake.


Front clip is supposed to be '79 Camaro but I haven't confirmed it yet. It has power steering and power disc brakes, 350 SBC with auto tranny. I need to align it and replace a coil that looks like it gave up or broke so it looks compressed all the time.

I'm going to replace the Ford drum brake rear end (don't know it's year) with a '95 TransAm rear with disc brakes and emergency brakes system.

I'll be starting my Project journal from Day#1 in a few days.

Here's where I need the most help :

My biggest issue is buying a fiberglass front end for it. I want to tilt it forward so in the future after it's all said and done and painted I can do maintenance comfortably on it without having to lean over the huge fenders and possibly scratch the paint. If I can't tilt it I'll still install a one piece fiberglass front but I'll install it fixed and remove it for maintenance.

The only places I have found are Midwest Early Ford and US Body Source and their prices are miles apart. For anyone who has purchased one or has any experience with this front, does this mean a quality difference? Does anyone know of any other place that sells it?

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Old 10-25-2012, 11:04 PM
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My friend still has 50 that has a fiberglass front end. Not sure where he got it from. I put one on a 56 about 10 years ago. I modified the hood so the fender bottom was mounted to the cowl so it could flip forward.

Its just like any aftermarket part and best to see it in person as quality can differ.
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:08 AM
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Thanks. I'm sure someone has a recent build I just hope they see this thread.
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PRHeloPilot View Post
Hi to all. I'm new to the forum but have been using the SEARCH button big time and learning alot about what awaits me. I purchased a 1949 F1 pickup which I thought was in pretty good condition. Turns out it was a pretty bad death trap if I planned on using it more than a few miles down the road or at over 20 MPH.

Anyway the restoration has begun and it's down to the frame. Just finished fabricating a new radiator mount and rerouting the transmission oil cooler lines. Today I'm removing all the wiring so I can replace and reroute everything. After we change the steering column and brake pedal system the Cab will be coming off. It's installed all crooked and tilted to the side. I'll also be converting it from pickup to a flat bed stake.


Front clip is supposed to be '79 Camaro but I haven't confirmed it yet. It has power steering and power disc brakes, 350 SBC with auto tranny. I need to align it and replace a coil that looks like it gave up or broke so it looks compressed all the time.

I'm going to replace the Ford drum brake rear end (don't know it's year) with a '95 TransAm rear with disc brakes and emergency brakes system.

I'll be starting my Project journal from Day#1 in a few days.

Here's where I need the most help :

My biggest issue is buying a fiberglass front end for it. I want to tilt it forward so in the future after it's all said and done and painted I can do maintenance comfortably on it without having to lean over the huge fenders and possibly scratch the paint. If I can't tilt it I'll still install a one piece fiberglass front but I'll install it fixed and remove it for maintenance.

The only places I have found are Midwest Early Ford and US Body Source and their prices are miles apart. For anyone who has purchased one or has any experience with this front, does this mean a quality difference? Does anyone know of any other place that sells it?
Don't want to discourage but, crooked cab...take a real close look at the cab mounts... Several may not be there any more....but I'm sure it'll show up when you take the cab off if the have deteriorated to that point.

Best Of Luck
Ray
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:38 AM
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Thanks. Yes the cab mounts were all there but based on all the previous crappy workmanship I knew I'd find something bad. One of the mounts had broken so the just welded it right there to another piece and then took 2 bolts on each side....for get it, it's depressing to even talk about it. Didn't know how dangerous people can be sometimes.

I think they just wanted a rat rod so kept throwing things together. I mean even the title was bad. It said 1949 DAEWOO !!! At least the lady at the DMV was a car buff and told me Daewoo wasn;t around until the 70s or 80s so she fixed it for me and I got my title corrected.

time to go to bed but in the morning we'll be taking the cab off and we'll continue to fix everything that was done wrong. It'll be a hell of a nice truck when I'm done with it, that's my goal.
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:56 AM
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If you are determined, and it sounds like you are, you will be fine. You have a wealth of information here with a bunch of good guys that do it for the shear love of the hobby.

I have my own rod/restoration business and some times I think I'm one of the luckiest guys in the world. How many people get to go to work and play...(besides professional athletes), and if you're reasonably good at it, they pay you quite well.

This forum lets me kind of "pay back" for an enjoyable career that has given me a comfortable life.

If you have questions, I'd be happy to help if I can (I don't know it all any more like I did when I was at the ages between 17 and 22).

Ray
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Old 10-26-2012, 09:06 AM
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Thanks Ray.

You sound like i sound when I help someone over on the helicopter forums. I do it for a living but have more fun helping others not make my mistakes. I also totally agree that I don't know as much now as when I was 22 when I knew it all, lol !

Actually back then at least I knew a little more about cars because with my neighbor's help I used to be able to rebuild my little Toyota motor and 1/4 mile drag race every other Friday. I've forgotten so much but it's slowly coming back with this '49 restoration.

Technology should help but I have to relearn everything. One quick example was yesterday at Best Buy. I went to see a radio I had researched for my truck because I'm redesigning all the switches and planning on covering all the unnecessary holes the previous owners made in the dash. So I ask the kid if they're all the same size and he looked at me funny. I told him when I used to install my radios I had to cut 3 holes. One for the center of the radio and 2 other holes for the shafts on the side for volume and station tuning. He looked at me like a dog looks at you when you make funny noises and turned his head thinking. Damn I'm getting old !
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Old 10-26-2012, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by PRHeloPilot View Post
Thanks Ray.

You sound like i sound when I help someone over on the helicopter forums. I do it for a living but have more fun helping others not make my mistakes. I also totally agree that I don't know as much now as when I was 22 when I knew it all, lol !

Actually back then at least I knew a little more about cars because with my neighbor's help I used to be able to rebuild my little Toyota motor and 1/4 mile drag race every other Friday. I've forgotten so much but it's slowly coming back with this '49 restoration.

Technology should help but I have to relearn everything. One quick example was yesterday at Best Buy. I went to see a radio I had researched for my truck because I'm redesigning all the switches and planning on covering all the unnecessary holes the previous owners made in the dash. So I ask the kid if they're all the same size and he looked at me funny. I told him when I used to install my radios I had to cut 3 holes. One for the center of the radio and 2 other holes for the shafts on the side for volume and station tuning. He looked at me like a dog looks at you when you make funny noises and turned his head thinking. Damn I'm getting old !
And Thank You for the kind words.

I understand what you mean about technology and I still have to wonder. Remember when a small block engine (doesn't matter about the manufacturer) would give you 23 -27 miles per gallon on the highway pushing a 4,000 pound plus car. You could work on them with a butter knife, dad's crescent wrench and a pair of rolled up sweat socks. Then in the early to mid 70's we had a fuel shortage and we became environmentally aware. Catalytic converters and pollution pumps pumps where the order of the day. You open the hood and with the electronic ignition, 347 extra vacuum hoses and more feet of extra wiring than Wilt Chamberlan had women, we collectively saved the environment and dropped down to 13 miles per gallon driving down hill on a nice day with a tail wind. I could never figure that one out.

It was a sad 20 lean years of not only poor fuel mileage, poor performance as well. Now we are moving forward, performance is better than ever, even the testing equipment is coming down in price. The one thing that still saddens me though is the people that work on the new cars today for the most part are not mechanics, they prefer to be called "technicians". I have a young fellow living down the street from me, who is a "licensed technician" for a local import dealership, came over and asked what I was doing. I told him I was changing the points in my AMX. He said, "I've heard about them but never seen any before". I said "what, points or the AMX. He said "either one". This young man reflects many in the trade today and that's fine but, it's the passion that will keep the older cars on the road and that's where we come in.

The new electronic age is here, we will not be repairing cars as much anymore as replacing parts and parts and parts until the hand held computer doesn't show anymore codes coming up. Kind of sad but it is what it is.

The new technology can be intimidating at first but, with a little time taken to learn what the part does and how it does it and why, things do make sense. Look at us now, factory cars making more horse power and torque than ever, my wife's north star is pushing over 300 horse power and she gets just under 30 miles per gallon on the highway. We have turned a corner in the performance area, now us older guys just have to figure out where it is we wanted to go. It's really not that difficult, read, ask questions, listen and learn. Isn't that we we did so many years ago?

Sorry for the long rant, just my take on old technology versus new.

Ray
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Old 10-26-2012, 10:32 AM
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Great post. I for one love the old cars and not until now, after searching through basically expensive rust buckets of crap have I finally found this good one. Or so I thought as I started tearing it down and finding all the things that were done wrong. At least it wasn't too rusted so it's a matter of replacing broken parts and fabricating new ones to make it safer. Still I know I'm loving every minute relearning things I had forgotten and when it's all said and done I'll have a modern (1995) drive train and suspension and still enjoy a 1949 Ford truck as a reliable daily driver.

Of course in order to be able to pay for this restoration I ended up exchanging in my 16 mpg 5.7 engine 2007 Toyota Tundra for a 50+ mpg 2012 Kia Optima HYBRID. I drive 849 miles one way to work every other week and that saved gas money is going to my F1 now.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:05 AM
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[QUOTE=PRHeloPilot;1603328]Great post. I for one love the old cars and not until now, after searching through basically expensive rust buckets of crap have I finally found this good one. Or so I thought as I started tearing it down and finding all the things that were done wrong. At least it wasn't too rusted so it's a matter of replacing broken parts and fabricating new ones to make it safer. Still I know I'm loving every minute relearning things I had forgotten and when it's all said and done I'll have a modern (1995) drive train and suspension and still enjoy a 1949 Ford truck as a reliable daily driver.

Of course in order to be able to pay for this restoration I ended up exchanging in my 16 mpg 5.7 engine 2007 Toyota Tundra for a 50+ mpg 2012 Kia Optima HYBRID. I drive 849 miles one way to work every other week and that saved gas money is going to my F1 now.[/QUOT

E]

Yes, it is hard to be sure you have that diamond in the rough and most often it is more rough than diamond. Good thing though, you do have a heavier gauge of metal to work with compared to today's cars. Always remember that the challenges we have now are the ones we can answer when somebody someday says "how the hell did you do that". That's when we can swell our chest and say, "you wouldn't believe what I had to do" and after you explain, some starry eyed youth (or even more rewarding when a pier looks at you and) goes WOW.

849 miles one way, WOW, and trust me, I'm not the starry eyed youth. With your KIA you'll have your project paid for in no time.

Ray
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:21 PM
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Funny how after I posted this I got 2 calls. One from a friend who works for the same company I work for. The second person that called is from our company HR department and she offered me to bid on a job "just" 245 miles away.

That's one of the good things about flying helicopter jobs under contract. I get to choose where I want to fly. This is a smaller helicopter but it's also only 4 1/2 driving hours away compared to 14 1/2 hours I do now. Those 10 extra hours I'll save plus being closer will be the difference between working on my truck one week a month versus two weeks a month because although I work one week on then one week off I don't usually drive home every other week but being closer I can come home every other week. Plus less gas so more money to spend on it which will speed things up also.

I agree that aside from all the fun rebuilding it and now knowing it's going to be done safely and correctly, it's always so satisfying to explain what we had to do to make it right. Also like you say, when someone else finds the same issue I'll be able to help them, like I do on the helicopter forums.

I'm taking pictures of every step of the journey and as soon as I get a little further along I'll post a Photo Journal.
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Old 10-26-2012, 01:04 PM
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Glad to hear you have less driving to do. I know what driving is all about. When I was a Tech Rep in Northern Alberta Canada for ICI automotive refinishes (now called Nexa) I would put on well over 100,000 miles a year. I did that for 10 years and it wears on you. See good things happen to good people.

Another thing I like to do for myself and my customers eat it up is keep a daily log with times pictures and side notes for reminders. This helps with the "now where did I leave off" issues that we all face. You can lay out your game plan and follow it. Time lines are rarely kept but at least you can point out the issues that caused you not to be on time or why you did it faster and it reminds you not to make the same mistake twice. I keep all my pertinent information as to web-sites I used, people I talked to on a certain date and what we talked about...the list goes on.

Now when the job is done I make a copy for my customer, when he goes to shows he can speak more intelligently on a question, it shows how much effort went into the build and I've been told that it helps in getting the selling price up there if he is ever inclined to do so. The lists of benefits goes on and on. Today I wouldn't do a build without one. I'm starting a new project now, I have a large amount of hours into it and I mean a lot of hours. Everything I have done is documented and with about 100 hours into the project, the parts are just starting to roll in. I am not allowed to speak to much on this build as the customer wants everything quiet until just before the big reveal. All I can say is that it is something that has never been done before, it will be subtle but, it will have have that what the, how the, where the, questions...the only one I can answer now is why the....That's because that is what the customer wanted.

Give this a try, it will save you time and money in the long run. Funny thing too, if I write stuff down I seem to remember it easier.

Hope this helps
Ray
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Old 10-26-2012, 01:16 PM
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Cool, I'll do that too. Where are you located? Other forums let you see where the people are from but although I filled it out for my profile I can't even find mine. I'm outside of DFW in Texas.
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Old 10-26-2012, 01:43 PM
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Cool, I'll do that too. Where are you located? Other forums let you see where the people are from but although I filled it out for my profile I can't even find mine. I'm outside of DFW in Texas.
I know what you mean, I was going to put out more information but can't find mine either. I am now living in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Here is a website URL of my last build. I did the frame off, all the paint and body. The bottom is as shinny as the outside, over 1300 parts painted Individually. It's a PPG Vibrance tri-coat called "Burnt Orange", base color is blue with a transparent orange shot over top. The ghost flames are seven different shades of blue air brushed and cleared.

The customer had a family member do the drive train and a buddy do the interior. I'm good with that because i was told up front. I like doing the builds like the next one I'm on, it's all mine from part selection to the final delivery.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wickedg...7629325924897/

I hope this works because my copy and paste didn't.

Let me know what you think

Ray
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:22 PM
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Just got home, I was skinning 3 pigs we caught in our cages this morning. I'll take a look at your pictures later, I'm beat !
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