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Old 11-18-2008, 06:01 PM
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1972 Camaro AC help

I hope this is the proper forum:

I have a 1972 Camaro that is NOT a factory A/C car.
A long time ago I ripped ALL the A/C out of a 1973 Formula 400 Firebird in a salvage. This setup has been sitting in storage for a long time and is now finally getting installed in Camaro 1972 Z28 clone right down to the suspension.

The engine is out and inner fender tucked away to make room.
I plan to use 1/16 steel to cover the heater opening, then finish cutting out the factory slot etc... the wiring is for the factory A/C Z28 full guage cluster package.

The question is: What Evaporator can be placed in the original housing to give the appearnace of original yet be late enough to be able to get replacements if necesary - more importantly to get away from the expansion valve.

Any advice or sugstions is appreciated -

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Old 11-18-2008, 07:22 PM
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Opps!

Friend,

Getting away from an expansion valve is like wanting to get away from the butterfly in you carburetor.

I would assume that your system will need some way of metering the refrigerant if you are going to toss the TXV.
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Old 11-18-2008, 08:59 PM
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Good point - I may be thinking of a newer type expansion valve as the local A/C shop said to replace the 70s version would be pricey.

Really looking for something newer to go back that is easier and more cost effective to repair.
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Old 11-18-2008, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zanzahl
Good point - I may be thinking of a newer type expansion valve as the local A/C shop said to replace the 70s version would be pricey.

Really looking for something newer to go back that is easier and more cost effective to repair.
They're probably talking about the newer style variable orifice tube. I'd look into something like a 81 models parts. New expansion valve for a 72 Z28 is only $20 at RockAuto's site.
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Old 11-19-2008, 08:13 PM
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I got it figured out. Going with a later model Evaporator and receiver / collector orrifice tube( as SSedan64 stated) to take place of expansion valve and sensing bulb mounted on the line, and relayed to the expansion valve via a capillary tube.
The after markets a real pain and all that is needed is a little firewall metal work, some holes cut and viola you have retrfit lae model A/C into vinatage houseing.

See this link for differences:
How to A/C expansion verses Orifice

Orifice tube air conditioning systems regulate refrigerant flow to the evaporator using a fixed metering device (orifice tube).


In an expansion valve air conditioning system, more efficient, refrigerant flow to the evaporator varies according to the pressure in the suction line (evaporator outlet). This is detected by a sensing bulb mounted on the line, and relayed to the expansion valve via a capillary tube.


I will post pics once I have it done.
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Old 11-20-2008, 08:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zanzahl
I got it figured out. Going with a later model Evaporator and receiver / collector orrifice tube( as SSedan64 stated) to take place of expansion valve and sensing bulb mounted on the line, and relayed to the expansion valve via a capillary tube.
The after markets a real pain and all that is needed is a little firewall metal work, some holes cut and viola you have retrfit lae model A/C into vinatage houseing.

See this link for differences:
How to A/C expansion verses Orifice

Orifice tube air conditioning systems regulate refrigerant flow to the evaporator using a fixed metering device (orifice tube).


In an expansion valve air conditioning system, more efficient, refrigerant flow to the evaporator varies according to the pressure in the suction line (evaporator outlet). This is detected by a sensing bulb mounted on the line, and relayed to the expansion valve via a capillary tube.


I will post pics once I have it done.
Zanzahl, The link posted in your earlier post? Please understand that the author of the article is playing fast and loose with his description of how refrigeration works. He is not beyond inventing his own descriptions as to what is going on inside an A/C unit, and departs from the accepted dynamics.

example:"By pressurizing the refrigerant, the compressor causes the refrigerant vapor to become much hotter than the outside air. This ensures that it will change to a liquid as the cycle enters the next phase."

Next paragraph: "As outside air is drawn over the condenser by the engine fan, or forced past it by the ram-air effect, the incoming air absorbs the heat contained in the high-pressure vapor. This causes the vapor to condense into a high-pressure liquid, completing the second phase of the process (condensation)."

There is no stage of refrigeration know as "Condensation", the refrigerant is a liquid when it leaves the compressor, and most importantly, this is the stage in which the heat gained from the inside of your passenger compartment is transferred to the outside air.

Condensate is formed from condensation,and is a process that is temperature dependent. Refrigeration is a pressure dependent process in which temperatures follow pressures. If you hook up a gauge pack to a bottle of refrigerant, you can tell what the temperature of the refrigerant is inside the bottle. If you use a thermometer to measure the temperature of the refrigerant, you can tell what pressure the refrigerant is at.

If someone were to describe the combustion stage in a 4-stroke engine, as when "the sparkplug causes the air/fuel mixture to explode" work for you?

A thermal expansion valve has one quality that may help you out in your situational, it will be a lot more tolerant of a refrigerant overcharge-undercharge condition than any other system, and still provide decent performance.

In order to get the results you are looking for, and to respect that these systems are engineered as a unit, grab all the pieces from which ever car you are taking them from, and use all of them for your new install. That includes using a refrigerant listed as what the system was designed around.

It can be this simple.
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Old 02-23-2009, 02:19 PM
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72 Camaro A/C retrofit of 1993 evap, accumulator, condensor.

Ok it has been a while and the the A/C is slow progress.
Let's say family obligations come first.

Ok so the 72 Camaro A/C, with the help of a local A/C shop, is now 1993 vinatage R134 system.

the Evaporator fir nicely in the original housing, the accumulator fits noce with some fabrication of a bracket. The A/C compressor is 1993 Camaro using factory hose set. The condensor is al that is left at this point. All the components are plugged until the condensor is in then All hoses get connected, then ececuate the system and recharge.

the A/C controls and wiring are in withthe vacuum lines remaining to be tested.

With in the next month I hope to have the A/C complete.

thanks folks.
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