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Old 05-02-2011, 11:27 AM
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lt1silverhawk lt1silverhawk is offline
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Hey 123pugsy, dsraven and T-Bucket23,

Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy
New gaskets must be used.
Throw away the front and rear rubber seals and use only RTV silicone at these two places. They WILL leak if you use them.
Got it.




Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy
As for cleaning the intake, I thought you mentioned the need for an EGR manifold. If you're replacing the manifold then you don't need to clean the black stripe off.
I am still researching the whole EGR issue. I found some information but want to double check with the forum members first before I make my case with the smog shop or the smog ref for the state. I believe my truck did not come with an EGR valve but I did locate a used Weiand locally just in case I need it. I will be posting what I found on this thread: "1977Chevrolet C/K Series Truck Identification and Smog Equipment Verification".




Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy
It would probably be the same if you clean it or not as the stripe will reappear in no time.
If it were mine, I would clean it.
Good to know about the stripe. I would clean it too if it ever went back on. I will give it a thorough cleaning, whether it gets replaced or not.




Quote:
Originally Posted by dsraven
there is a product called "the right stuff" by permatex I think. it is a quicker drying silicone, so if you need to get it running sooner try that. if you use rtv, don't put oil or coolant in the engine untill the next day or it may track itself out through the silicone and you will find a seeping type leak over time. read the directions (when nobody is looking of course).
Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy
You'll have to take off the cover, tap the metal back flat if its bent down again. Try something called Right Stuff on both sides of the gasket if you don't want to buy new covers.
Lol! I'll close the garage door before I attempt this thing called "reading". Might be a bit rusty at it though... So that's two votes for the Right Stuff. I think I already pick up a can. If not, I'll buy it soon.




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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsraven
run a tap through all the holes you will be putting bolts in as well, then use either oil, antisieze, sealer, or loctite on the threads never install a bolt without one of those items used on the threads first.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy
The bolts should have sealant as I've had oil come up thru the threads and puddle on the intake before.

PCV was probably not fuctioning properly at the time but the Permatex 2 stopped the seepage.
Added to the list. Never realized a clogged PCV could do that.




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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsraven
for the long flat gasket surfaces you can use a piece of body sandpaper, like 100 or 180 grit, stapled onto a piece of plywood or similar long flat board, to clean upthe gakset surfaces. orif you want to spend a little cashola, get one of the buffer pads with the scotchbrite material and run t on your drill. just be carefull because on aluminum it will take the material of as well as the gasket.
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-bucket23
You need to be cautious with those Scotchbrite style disks. Some, the brown ones, contain abrasive material that will end up in the engine and wipe out bearings in short order. The green disks that look like a rubber broom are much better and don't contain abrasive particles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy
I never thought of the flying grit factor.

Going at it with a putty knife and rags stuck in all the holes is probably the safest way to go.

Time consuming but safe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-bucket23
I have seen a few instances where people have lost engines after an intake leak repair and the mating surfaces were cleaned with one of the brown Scotchbrite style pads. We actually sent oil out from one that another shop had done it is came back with silicate I believe it was in the oil.
Engine blew 5 days after an intake gasket job (we didnt do it).
Yikes, glad you guys brought up all this before I started. So my thinking is, cover all ports and holes with rags and shop towels, scrape off what I can using a blade or putty knife. And then smooth it out perhaps using sand paper?




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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsraven
make sure to use the boroscope throgh any possible holes to find that *&^% bolt before you start assembly.
have fun,
dsraven
Oh I'm having loads of fun learning, believe it or not. I must point out that after I lost the first bolt, I did start the engine after replacing the bolt and ran it for quite a while as I was playing with the timing. I stopped after the oil began leaking out from the same valve cover. But I will use the boroscope to see what I can find. I will also try fishing behind the engine using the hose and magnet.



Thanks for the tips and pointers guys!
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