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  #76 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2007, 08:48 PM
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23 T?

Looking forward to your plans Youngster

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  #77 (permalink)  
Old 09-27-2007, 09:05 PM
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hubs/brakes?

Youngster, I'm going with '37-41 Ford spindles on the tube axle. For most of your projects, what hubs/brakes do you prefer... that are readily available from wrecking yards.

Appreciate anyone else's response too.
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  #78 (permalink)  
Old 09-28-2007, 07:33 AM
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'23 T bucket ?

I like the '40 Ford set up, mostly because of the traditional look. About the easiest set up to find would be the '48 to '56 F-1 or F-100 1/2 ton pick-up brakes. I don't have the part numbers right at hand, but there have been many, many articles written about this swap. I wouldn't be surprised to find a previous post right here on HBB. Along with those brakes and a Maverick 8" rear, a master cylinder for a '67 Mustang, drum/drum, non-power, works real well. I think the NAPA part number is 101485.

Youngster
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Old 09-29-2007, 07:33 PM
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I was expecting to hear about some disk brake setup but your drum-drum response was better than I thought- I have a buddy that restores '50s Ford pickups and he has lots of donor trucks. I will keep my eyes open for the brake swap articles. Thanks youngster.
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Old 09-30-2007, 10:30 PM
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Youngster,

You need to write a book on this! Seriously - the now out of print "How to Build a T-Bucket Roadster on a Budget" by Chester Greenhalgh routinely sells for $150+ on fleabay! (a 144 page paperback!)

Steve
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  #81 (permalink)  
Old 09-30-2007, 10:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngster
A 26' wide frame sometimes, depending on the body you use, will need to have a cut out in the lower front edge of the cowl. Some are made from a '15 T and some are made from a '23 T. The '15 had a narrower firewall. Using a 23" wide frame also gives you room to wood the cowl area. The radiator will tuck into the frame nicely without gaps along side. One word of caution here , if you are using 2x3 tubing, go with 24" outside to outside. I use 1 1/2 x3 11ga. tubing. Sorry, I didn't think of that before. Hope that's not a problem.
Chester Greenhalgh in his book "How to Build a T-Bucket Roadster on a Budget" uses a frame that's tapered from the back to the front, I've often wondered why he did that - now I wonder if this isn't why? I'll see if I can dig up his frame specs.

(and no, I didn't spend a pile of money on this book! -> a friend loaned me his copy to peruse a while back)

Steve
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Old 09-30-2007, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngster
all-world1....I personally like to use an original T shell. They aren't so bulky looking and holes for the hood lacing just seem to add a little flavor to the front end of the car. They can be found every where from e-bay to antique shops. I found 3 at a farm auction, 2 perfect ones and one not so good, for 7 dollars and some change.
Wow! I've got some friends who go to auctions a lot and I've had them keeping an eye out for about a year now and we've not found much. T's are pretty much non-existant here in Nebraska. A's are out there though. Usually if they are in any kinda shape though they go high, otherwise they are usually rusted to death and probably not worth all the work in the long run. We haven't ran across an A roadster yet.

If you're inclined I'd probably offer to triple your money and go as much as $21 for one of your 3 . . . MN isn't that far from Nebraska!

Seriously, I'm so close to Speedway that I'm thinking I'll just grab one of their bodies.

We went up to Speedway a couple weeks ago and took a tour of Bill Smith's Museum of American Speed. It was heavily into racing and peddle cars but had enough street rod stuff to keep my boys and I interested. I hadn't been to Speedway in a couple decades. They are in a new building now and I was surprised that they don't really have a show room or anything any more (years ago they had a small showroom that was stacked to the ceiling) now they just have a small area with a table and catalogs and a few things hanging on the wall and a parts counter running along one edge. Kinda disappointing . . . the parts guy was great though and he took us back to look at one of the all steel A roadsters they are selling now - it's pretty neat! He said there was a GM plant in South Africa and it was shutting down and Bill cut a deal with them to stamp out the A bodies. Kind of interesting that an American icon such as the Ford model A is being made in an old GM plant in a foreign country! Of course I heard the last Ford flathead engine was made by a company owned by Chrysler in a South American Factory for the French military . . .

TTYL,

Steve
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  #83 (permalink)  
Old 09-30-2007, 11:34 PM
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I think it's Total Performance that sells a tapered frame.

Agree with Steve about the book thing... youngster's wealth of knowledge could even support a cable tv network. I've learned more from him in the last month than I could ever imagine.

Craig
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  #84 (permalink)  
Old 09-30-2007, 11:58 PM
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The decision to build a straight frame or a tapered frame is probably more due to personal choice. You do get to have it narrow at the radiator and a bit wider at the firewall for a nicer looking fit with the tapered frame. It also takes more effort to build. Not a whole lot but it takes more time for measuring and squaring up than the straight frame.
The rear kickup behind the body will depend upon how much rake you want the frame to have. I think I suggested it earlier in the thread but if and when I build another T I will probably mock up the frame using 2x4s to make sure everything is going to fit the way I want it to. That would let you get the measurements right and get the design the way you want it without cutting and welding expensive tubing. The wood can always be put to another use after it has served it's time dummying up the frame.
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Old 10-01-2007, 02:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by all-world1
I think it's Total Performance that sells a tapered frame.

Agree with Steve about the book thing... youngster's wealth of knowledge could even support a cable tv network. I've learned more from him in the last month than I could ever imagine.

Craig
Not quite a book, but it looks like Youngster is already ahead of us and is working on a set of plans! Whoo Hoo! Check this thread:

Youngster working on releasing a set of plans
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  #86 (permalink)  
Old 10-01-2007, 07:48 PM
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'23 T bucket ?

Whoa.....back up the bookmobile here!!!!!! I really appreciate all the kind words but I'm far from being a top authority on these great little cars. I've just had a lot of experience with them. The "Plans" I'm working on are just for the frame, front and rear suspensions. These are the areas that I see most often where people seem to have the most problems. Safety is one of my biggest concerns. The frame is the foundation of any car. Because of that, it needs to be well engineered. All the parts have to work well together to be safe. I hope to eliminate most of the guess work for you guys. As I stated before, most everything I've learned about building a T has come from people with a lot more experience than I have.

Thanks for the encouragement, Youngster
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Old 10-01-2007, 10:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngster
Whoa.....back up the bookmobile here!!!!!! I really appreciate all the kind words but I'm far from being a top authority on these great little cars. I've just had a lot of experience with them. The "Plans" I'm working on are just for the frame, front and rear suspensions. These are the areas that I see most often where people seem to have the most problems. Safety is one of my biggest concerns. The frame is the foundation of any car. Because of that, it needs to be well engineered. All the parts have to work well together to be safe. I hope to eliminate most of the guess work for you guys. As I stated before, most everything I've learned about building a T has come from people with a lot more experience than I have.

Thanks for the encouragement, Youngster
Good evening Youngster,

No book? Even if we said pretty please with sugar on top???

Actually I understand that completely - I've written a few technical articles for trade journals and the such (not automotive though) and just a short article takes more work than one would think -> a complete book would take quite a bit of work and when this stuff starts being work it stops being fun!

Besides that I can tell you would be worried people would just build clones of what you outlined and not let their creativity express it's self and I can tell you thoroughly enjoy seeing the personal touches people incorporate into their creations and you wouldn't want to adversely influence that in any way. (this kinda reminds me of cooking - about anyone can follow a recipe but the really good cooks just know how to cook by grabbing a little of this and a little of that)

I think your idea of a basic set of plans (or are they better called "well explained ideas") for a safe and functional frame so newbies have a good starting point is a great idea and I appreciate you taking the time to do them for us!

I would like to request(beg) that you incorporate a little discussion with them where it would be beneficial - thinks like why that particular width of the frame was chosen (so it's more compatible with the bodies, etc.) are good things to know.

I think the best way to build one of these would be to have a pile of money and do it all at once, but alas many of us would be more successful doing it piece meal every pay day. Unfortunately that is a problem as some things depend upon others . . . for example I can see that having the exact body you are going to use there when you make the frame would be a tremendous advantage but I've heard it's best to not store fiberglass bodies off of their frames as they like to warp. Buying the body and building or buying the frame at the same time would be a good idea but then we have the body setting there in our crampt garage and you just know it's going to get beat up while we build the rest of the car, soooo a frame that's been engineered to work with most any body would be a tremendous advantage to us piece mealers I believe.

Anyway, looking forward to seeing what you come up with . . . and reading all your great posts here on the forums!

Take Care,

Steve
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  #88 (permalink)  
Old 10-02-2007, 06:33 AM
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If you need detailed chassis plans go to the Total Performane web site and down load their manual. It has all the fine details of every part you need to build a complete T Bucket.... cost $20.00

http://www.tperformance.com/street_r...in_pdf_format/

There is also a lot of info at the Spirit Cars web site. They are have a live web broadcast tonight. Check their web site for the Burns Road Show.

http://forums.bucketheadbash.com/index.php

Then here is a frame plan from Spirit Cars posted on their web site. You have to scroll down the page.
http://forums.bucketheadbash.com/showthread.php?t=107

Last edited by RPM; 10-02-2007 at 06:42 AM.
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Old 10-02-2007, 10:03 AM
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re '40 ford

What Ihave done in the past is take it to a metal recycling center & for a small fee they will generally weigh it for you.
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  #90 (permalink)  
Old 10-03-2007, 07:04 PM
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23 T Bucket?

Steve....I didn't realize how big of a project this would turn out to be. As I said before, I'm no tech writer. It's easy for me to tell some one all this information, but it's something else to put it into words. That's not to say I won't get it done. I said I would, therefore I will.

It's been my experience in the past to see T's started on a piece by piece build, unfortunately it seems a high percentage of these projects stall before completion. That's why I always suggest that a builder starts with enough parts to get to a certain stage before they start the actual build. At least that way, if the drive stops, there is something to sell to recoup some of the investment. As a rule, the more money initially vested, the better chance the project will get finished. In my own case, I like to have 90% of the car in front of me before I start the build.

To build a quality car, you have to spend some money for the right parts. The place you save money is by doing as much of the work as you can. It's totally possible to build a car for $5000, but every time you have to pay someone else to do something, the price goes up.

As far as the body and when to purchase it goes, The best time to buy it is,IMO, after the chassis is up on wheels. At this point, you can glass the floor in and that will pretty much keep it from changing shape. It will also give you a good reference point for engine placement, gas tank and battery, steering, etc. Besides, then you can sit in it and make disgusting noises when you need a little encouragement to get to work on it! Trust me, your wife will think you've lost it if she catches you!

Youngster
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