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Old 09-21-2011, 10:37 AM
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327 vs 350

Hi guys,

I'm new to chevy engines so this has probably been answered a million times but here goes..

How do you tell a 327 chevy from a 350?

I know you can run the numbers but sometimes the decoders just tell you its a 327 or 350. Is there some easy way to spot the difference or do you actually have to look at the crank and such?

Thanks!

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Old 09-21-2011, 11:03 AM
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What year is it?
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Old 09-21-2011, 11:08 AM
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I have both a 67 and 69

I know after 68 or 69 they didn't make the 327 anymore
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Old 09-21-2011, 11:15 AM
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Some 327 and 350`s shared the same casting numbers. So there are other ways you can tell. One way is by the suffix code stamped on the block`s deck on the passengers side front of the block.
It will look like this example:
V1122GHF
Another way is to check the cranks casting numbers.
Since small block parts interchange the year doesn`t make any difference since they are all identical externally.
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Old 09-21-2011, 11:15 AM
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Ok give me the numbers or look at front and back. At the back of the crank they are different of a 350 and 327
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Old 09-21-2011, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleVision
Some 327 and 350`s shared the same casting numbers. So there are other ways you can tell. One way is by the suffix code stamped on the block`s deck on the passengers side front of the block.
It will look like this example:
V1122GHF
Another way is to check the cranks casting numbers.
Since small block parts interchange the year doesn`t make any difference since they are all identical externally.
He is right but, I have found out with the year and casting, you can be pretty sure of what you got.
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Old 09-21-2011, 12:07 PM
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DoubleVision is right.

Date codes and casting numbers identify the block when cast.
Both 327 and 350 ci engines built from same casting with overlapping years.
In later years there were other displacement engines built from same castings (ie 305, 307 and 350).

Suffix codes are stamped on the deck when the engine is prepped and assembled.
Note that the numbers preceding the suffix code are the serial number for the car (part of the VIN) and are a good indicator of an original engine in a car when these numbers match.

CAUTION: There are documented cases where these stamped codes are reproduced.
That is why provenance (documentation) is needed to verify a numbers matching car.

There are books available to assist in identification of an engine.

I have books that cover from 1965 through 1975. I have other books but the information is not as detailed.

If you can give me the date, casting, and stamped codes I can give you a pretty good idea of the engine displacement, HP rating, transmission, and application (which car).
However, my book does not identify most truck engines (limited info) or replacement engines (both factory and aftermarket).

If you are looking for a way to identify a 327 or 350 at a swap meet or through CL, you will need to become familiar with the different casting numbers used.

The importance of knowing this depends on your purpose.
If you seek a 'correct' engine for restoration, then you are looking for a specific casting number, date code, and perhaps a specific suffix stamping as well.
If you are just looking to build either a 350 or a 327 it really doesn't matter, both blocks will have the standard 4.000" bore, the differance is the crankshaft stroke (3.25" for 327, 3.48" for 350).

For a builder there are more important things to check.
1) Look for '010' cast in the block, this indicates high nickle content in the iron block, considered to be stronger with higher nickle content.
2) 4 bolt mains, preferred for high rpm/horsepower engines (some prefer 2 bolt mains - strong enough with less parasitic losses for more horsepower).
3) Forged crankshaft are much stronger than nodular iron (id these by the broader parting line from the casting).

Hope this helps - btw, I'm not that smart, all of this stuff is available in books about SBC engines.
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Old 09-21-2011, 02:12 PM
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I've never heard the parasitic loss comment related to four bolt mains. Could you help me to understand where these loses originate? I think about all you said was spot on, but as I say, I've never heard the parasitic loss comment before. Always looking to gain knowledge.
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Old 09-21-2011, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatM
I've never heard the parasitic loss comment related to four bolt mains. Could you help me to understand where these loses originate? I think about all you said was spot on, but as I say, I've never heard the parasitic loss comment before. Always looking to gain knowledge.

the parasitic loss comment is total BS.
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Old 09-21-2011, 02:40 PM
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Well, AP72, I've gotta say that you're a lot less delicate than I am. However, I am open to new ideas, and sometimes they come from places where they are not expected. So, perhaps someone can help us to understand. ;-)

Pat
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Old 09-21-2011, 07:00 PM
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PatM...I'm with you on the comment....but I see no reason why, given the same bearing material, same bearing surface area a 4-bolt main would cause more parasitic loss than a 2-bolt main. Even though the 4-bolt main has a clamping force of 75 lbs. ft. on the inner bolts and 65 on the outers compared to the 65 lbs. ft. on a 2-bolt block, the bearing clearance would remain the same....hence no parasitic loss......I reckon.
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Old 09-21-2011, 07:29 PM
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327Nut, I think you're right on. The bolts are simply hi-tension springs that keep the cap from moving. That's why they have the high preload. But the bores are cut WITH the preload already clamping down. Hence, the main bores should be identical either way. Perhaps the wider caps are thought to provide more shear area where lubricant is cought between the cap and the crank throw?

Somehow, I doubt that'd be measureable.
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Old 09-21-2011, 08:24 PM
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So like DV said- total BS! Call it what it is for crying out loud. Coating BS in sugar doesn't change the smell.

There are differences in the casting shapes of the front of the blocks between SJ 327 and 283 blocks. But to be able to tell a 327 or 302 from a 350 can't be done by external inspection- you need to measure the stroke or run the crank numbers to know the stroke, the other info will only tell you the nominal bore diameter.

I said it can't be done. This is incorrect, in that there are differences in the crank flanges between the different strokes. At least some of them. If you happen to know the exact shape of the crank flanges, you may be able to tell one from the other.
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Old 09-22-2011, 01:41 AM
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The only thing that smells is your comment, nobody sugar coated anything and you need to get your facts straight. DV had nothing but good info for the OP, it was ap72 that made the total BS comment....."for crying out loud".
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 327NUT
The only thing that smells is your comment, nobody sugar coated anything and you need to get your facts straight. DV had nothing but good info for the OP, it was ap72 that made the total BS comment....."for crying out loud".
My apologies to DV- ap72 for the win. BS IS BS, friend- call it what it is for crying out loud. And PC can bite me, along w/anyone who sugar coats BS.
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