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hotboy454 06-29-2012 10:09 AM

468bbc-solid roller
 
Hello I'm finally getting ready to assemble my big block. But i had a few solid roller questions. Im building a 468bbc using 781 heads with 2.19/1.88 valves bowl ported. Rpm air gap with 800 holley dp, 1 3/4 headers 3 in flows cam I'm using is 11-771-8 xe280r I've herd so many reviews about lifter failure in stop in go traffic. As you know this is a hot street set up.I'm running enduring-x lifters other than setting lash would the lifters fail in stop and go traffic. The description say for street use. I have all the variable to run this cam. Should I stay with it or go another route. I've herd good and bad from running solid roller on the street. I'm at 10.1 with 118cc heads just looking for a solid 500-550 HP hot street car. Thank much for all honest input.

68NovaSS 06-29-2012 12:14 PM

They are "Endurance" lifters. I have a set of the Isky RedZone solid rollers in my blower car on the street with no problems, but I do inspect them often. We have a member here who had a solid roller come apart in his 388 blower motor, needles everywhere, with major damage. So they're not a throw them in and run it piece.

Mr. P-Body 06-29-2012 12:42 PM

Any of the modern "positive oiling" lifters are fine. Comp calls theirs "Endurex". Crower "HIPPO" and Isky "E-Z-Roll" are also this type. They have an "EDM" hole drilled at the oil band, that pressurizes the needles in the wheel (except the Isky which has a bushing instead of needles).

We've used the Comps in Chevys and Pontiacs for a few years now. Zero issues, as many as 30K street miles at 500-plus HP.

Highly recommend restrictors to prevent pumping ALL the oil to the valve covers... Again, LOTS of street miles, no issues.

FWIW

Jim

hotboy454 06-29-2012 12:50 PM

468bbc-solid roller
 
I don't mind setting lash every so often. It sounds like what your saying is that it will make the most power,but its just a matter of time before it grenades in street or strip use. Before I get knee deep before I assemble this cam, do you have any cam recommendations to yield the 500-550 HP&trq. I'm looking for. I was considering lunati 60205 cam with 10.1 compression 3000 stall 3.73 gears I was told it was to big to use on the street. I'm stumphed on what to do I want to build it and be happy mind you this is my first BBC. If sbc I would know how to build that without thought.

68NovaSS 06-29-2012 12:54 PM

Here's a link to some of Isky's offering, the RedZone Max Endurance are what I'm using without any failures.

http://www.summitracing.com/search/P...d=isky+lifters"]http://www.summitracing.com/search/Part-Type/Lifters/Lifter-Style/Mechanical-roller/Make/CHEVROLET/Engine-Size/7-4L-454/?keyword=isky+lifters"]http://www.summitracing.com/search/Part-Type/Lifters/Lifter-Style/Mechanical-roller/Make/CHEVROLET/Engine-Size/7-4L-454/?keyword=isky+lifters[/URL][/URL]

hotboy454 06-29-2012 12:58 PM

468-solid roller
 
@Mr.P-body what is oil restrictors I never herd of that. And never ran a solid roller cam. Im having so much trouble before the install I can't image how I'd be during break in and infospace drive. Just to keep my state of mind I should back out if this save the solid roller for another build and just go Hyd.roller cam for simplicity. Geesh I thought build motors wad suppose to be fun. Now I created a nightmare. With the possibility of have a future garage sale.lmfao.

hotboy454 06-29-2012 01:02 PM

ARE there any alternatives or should I build what I have and just do regular adjustment ad needed. I don't mind switching came since I haven't install it yet but would like to this weekend.

Mr. P-Body 06-30-2012 10:40 AM

Restrictors are "spool valves" that screw into the rear oil galleries, slowing down the flow of oil VOLUME (not pressure) to the lifters, pushrods and rockers. This accomplishes two important functions. First, "soilds" (flat or roller) tend to be much more "free flowing" with the oil supply. Hydraulics have an internal "metering" system that "uses up" some oil volume in the normal process. By restricting the flow to the top, it prevents all the oil in the pan from being pumped into the valve covers without enough time to return to the pan under harsh conditions. Enough oil is provided to lube all the parts and cool the valve springs. The "bonus" is it "force feeds" the bottom end by diverting the unused volume to the mains, and in turn, the rods. All goodness. No "downside". Several companies offer them. Moroso is reliable.

As for periodic adjustment, if you use quality valve train parts (rockers, studs, etc.), this will be minimal. With the BBC, a stud "girdle" always helps. The splayed valves make for adventures in valve train, regardless of lifter "type". We generally use a girdle in any BBC seeing more than .650" lift and/or above 6,500 RPM.

Jim

joelster 06-30-2012 03:06 PM

I run the CROWER Maximus lifters with the HIPPO oiling. They were expensive at almost $900 but they are very beefy. I had them side by side alongside of 2 other Comp lifters and there was no comparison. Pic is below. The hardest part of street driving is idling, believe it or not. Keep the idle up comfortably high at say 1000rpm and the lifters will thank you for it.

Crower Maximus on left, Comp solid in the middle with oiling groove, Comp solid on right without oiling groove

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a76...s/P6290454.jpg

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a76...s/P6290455.jpg

Crower on the left, Comp on the right. The link bar is chinsy on the Comp lifters

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a76...s/P6300456.jpg

BigChevyFTW 06-30-2012 05:21 PM

is there a reason you went with a soild roller instead of a hyd roller for the street?

IMO the HYD is a better choice for street driving applications.
the soild rollers are more for high rpm strip use but some people run them on the street.

if you can return the soild roller and the lifters id return em and get a HYD set up just for piece of mind. but it all depends if you like wrenching every 1000 miles.

my87Z 06-30-2012 05:47 PM

I use Howards direct lube pro max lifters in mine, idles at about 1100rpm and i adjust the lash twice a year. when i do they barely need any adjustment. but they are around 650.00 too. i would't say that you need this expensive of a lifter. i would think that a set of the Howards direct lube pro lite lifters would be just fine

F-BIRD'88 07-04-2012 01:30 AM

On this cam set the valve lash cold at .012" intake and .014" ex.

You should have no problem at all making 500hp with this cool street cam.
It will probabily make more.
If you find you want more top end use the next bigger XR286R-10 11-772-8

Again set the valve lash cold at .012" in and .014" ex.

Max performance, quiet valves, minimum stress on roller lifters.
Creates correct hot and running valve lash for this cam.

The real valve lash will grow just slightly as the motor warms up to running temp.
.002" to .004".

I just did the valve lash on my friends 396 with one of these cams.
no problems after 2 years street running. and more than 1 7000+rpm blast.
valves lash were all +/- .004" after 2 years.
standard Comp cams solid roller lifters

Most people set the valve lash too loose. That is hard on the lifters.

This XR286R-10 solid roller cam runs quieter than the hyd XE cam in my small block.

F-BIRD'88 07-04-2012 01:38 AM

98% of any trouble with solid roller cams in street motors
is from trying to use a race only radical race roller cams and race only valve springs on the street and incorrect valve lash adjustment method. Do not use oil restrictors in a street motor.

Make sure the roller cam cam button to timing cover clearance is correct and the timing cover does not flex forward.

Mr. P-Body 07-05-2012 08:14 AM

The "appearance" of a lifter is meaningless. The Crower lifter is a good one. So is the Comp. The Comp is significantly lighter in weight, and the area where the weight is "removed" is not where strength is an issue. The Comp "Endurex" lifters run about $500 a set. MANY out there with more than 10K street miles and plenty of "street/strip" action.

For the "record", I don't make these recommendations based on other peoples' experiences. I base them on MY experience, WITH these engines. I have offered a valid reason for using restrictors. Simply saying "never use restrictors in a as street engine" without specifically explaining WHY makes only for more confusion. If you have reasons other than "that's the way I've always done it", please share. I'm "here to tell you", using restrictors will NOT affect longevity in a negative manner, just the opposite. If you've had oiling problems, look elsewhere.

Jim

joelster 07-05-2012 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. P-Body (Post 1571050)
The "appearance" of a lifter is meaningless. The Crower lifter is a good one. So is the Comp. The Comp is significantly lighter in weight, and the area where the weight is "removed" is not where strength is an issue. The Comp "Endurex" lifters run about $500 a set. MANY out there with more than 10K street miles and plenty of "street/strip" action.

For the "record", I don't make these recommendations based on other peoples' experiences. I base them on MY experience, WITH these engines. I have offered a valid reason for using restrictors. Simply saying "never use restrictors in a as street engine" without specifically explaining WHY makes only for more confusion. If you have reasons other than "that's the way I've always done it", please share. I'm "here to tell you", using restrictors will NOT affect longevity in a negative manner, just the opposite. If you've had oiling problems, look elsewhere.

Jim

Well I beg to differ on the appearance part being "meaningless". On MY engine with a .900" base circle cam, the body portion of the Comp lifters is so far down into the lifter bore that I was apprehensive about possibly cocking one in the lifter bore. Think of a short skirt piston with over half of it hanging down below the cylinder. I feel way more comfortable running the Crower's for my application. Maybe the Comp's wouldn't have presented a problem for me, but I wasn't willing to take that chance. I asked a few experts on yb and they recommended a taller bodied lifter. I didn't weigh them but yes, the Crowers are much heavier.


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