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-   -   47 Ford 1T Delivery Van Chassis (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/47-ford-1t-delivery-van-chassis-238193.html)

Plain Ed 08-30-2013 05:48 PM

47 Ford 1T Delivery Van Chassis
 
It seems like the consensus is to use the original chassis although I plan to redo it with the same dimensions using rectangular tubing. I plan to use a mustang II front end and a four link (maybe ridetek) rear. This seems doable. I am fair at welding but have a friend that is a pro and he will do the final welding.

One question is how to you determine final ride height?

I had planned to put in a new Ecoboost 6 but looking at a 50 coupe build it seems like a little more technical than I can do and so I am leaning towards a 302. It will be all Ford.

Thanks for any advice.

timothale 08-31-2013 08:06 AM

welder series
 
Welder Series makes Weld it your self hot rod parts including Mustang II front end kits. Their catalog has about 10 pages of the M II front end info, and they have a lot of Utube info.

Old Doug 09-01-2013 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plain Ed (Post 1726297)
It seems like the consensus is to use the original chassis although I plan to redo it with the same dimensions using rectangular tubing. I plan to use a mustang II front end and a four link (maybe ridetek) rear. This seems doable. I am fair at welding but have a friend that is a pro and he will do the final welding.

Thanks for any advice.

What do you mean are you building a new frame? How much weight can a pinto front end handle just wondered ? I know alot of people use them but they were made to handle the weight of a small car with a small engine.

Plain Ed 09-02-2013 07:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old Doug (Post 1729761)
What do you mean are you building a new frame? How much weight can a pinto front end handle just wondered ? I know alot of people use them but they were made to handle the weight of a small car with a small engine.

Thanks, Doug.

The MII front ends seem to hold up. The other option I saw was a 70-ish F-150 twin I-beam. Still considering that option. I plan on building the frame from rectangular tubing. I will do the cutting and tacking and I have a friend that is a pro that will do the final welds.

Plain Ed 04-24-2014 07:44 PM

47 Ford Ride Height
 
Do you have the stock ride height for a 47 Ford 1T Delivery Van.

Regarding MII, check out FatMan Fabrications. They seem to have the best stuff and are very knowledgeable.

I plan on building my own chassis from 2x6x3/8 and 2x4x3/8 tubing. Rails are cheap. The front and rear suspension parts are the pricey items.

I have kind of settle in on 255/55R17 rear tires and 215/60R17 Fronts.

PlainEd

ericnova72 04-24-2014 09:54 PM

3/8" wall tubing is way thicker than you need, twice+ thicker, it will weigh a TON, a Battleship. Using the tall 2" x 4" and 2"x 6" tubing a 3/16" wall is plenty, and 1/8" is used a lot.

Drag race chassis builders use just .083" wall 2 x 3" tube, although the roll bar cage does a lot of the work there too

techinspector1 04-24-2014 10:06 PM

2" x 3" x 10 gauge
2" x 4" x 10 gauge
2" x 6" x 10 gauge
Any of these will be stiff as a minister's third member.

timothale 04-24-2014 10:13 PM

welder series info
 
Welder series in Canada sells weld it your self hot rod parts including Mustang II suspensions. I have one of their old catalogs and it has lots of good info on setting up your chassis and suspensions.It might still be on their web site.

http://www.welderseries.com/instruct...s/WS14340N.pdf
https://www.welderseries.com/blog/mu...ication-chart/

ericnova72 04-24-2014 10:14 PM

Just adding to Richard's post ^^^^

For the guys not familiar with it, 10 gauge is .134" thick.

techinspector1 04-24-2014 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plain Ed (Post 1726297)
One question is how to you determine final ride height?

I see you've asked this question twice now, so it must be on the fore of your mind. The answer is that you position the body and frame, with wooden blocks, where you want them to be when the car is finished, then you build the front and rear suspension into the car. You don't insert the springs in the suspension until you're done with the suspension and ready to put the car on the ground. The easy part is getting the right spring rate. Just talk to these guys when you're ready for springs.....
http://www.eatondetroitspring.com/

Try to begin with a flat and level floor. My garage floor looked pretty flat until I began to assemble a wooden deck to build my roadster on. I found out that the floor was 1 3/4" lower at the front of the garage than it was at the rear of the garage.

S10xGN 04-25-2014 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by techinspector1 (Post 2296146)
...Try to begin with a flat and level floor. My garage floor looked pretty flat until I began to assemble a wooden deck to build my roadster on. I found out that the floor was 1 3/4" lower at the front of the garage than it was at the rear of the garage.

My garage floor almost got me too. I ended up making adjustable jackstand adapters from industrial scaffold legs, the ones with the "tee" bar handles and Acme threads. About $100 for four from Northern and they're 2 feet long so they can be cut to whatever length works for you. With four of these and a laser level you can get pretty close...

Russ


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