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Old 05-28-2011, 06:14 PM
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50 merc toe-in info needed??

Do you know what the toe-in on a kustom chevy powered merc might be?Its running coker radials. If you can help i have 3/16" toe-in and need more i believe.Iwas informed in should be more than stock bias belt tires, but really am not sure , Any help genuinely appreciated bob s

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Old 05-28-2011, 06:54 PM
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Old 05-28-2011, 07:09 PM
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What suspension do you have under the front? That will be the determining factor on alignment specs. I have heard of playing with specs based upon Bias vice Radial tires, but never from some one I considered a very experienced and knowledgeable front end guy.

Trees
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Old 05-29-2011, 06:51 AM
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Trees i have spoken to many people over the years and never got the same answer twice on most of the cars i built. My mercury is a stock front kingpin.And lowered spindles, problem is many shops won't do these anymore. I have been told by a guy in ca .........i live in michigan.7/16"Then just of course i got another . reply to help . This one is nearby. my house. he meentioned adding more toe-so i self taught in most things, decided to go to 5/8-to-3/4" toe-in. i haven't done it yet.But as was told adjust......... to just below squealing tires during driving. this sounds a bit far out to me. thanks for your reply trees bob s
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Old 05-29-2011, 07:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsa_bob
just below squealing tires during driving. this sounds a bit far out to me. thanks for your reply trees bob s
What a load of crap, you do not want the tires to scuff down the road you just want the car to run straight with minimal resistance/drag to go fast....



Adjustments
When solid axle suspensions were the norm under production cars, they usually had a certain amount of positive camber. As examples, early Fords called for 1/4 to 1 degree, Chevys 1/2 to 1 1/2 degrees, and Mopars 1/4 to 3/4 degree. And while those figures are still valid, most contemporary radial tires generate the most cornering force with a trace of negative camber, around a 1/2-degree. So how much camber should your street have? Most aftermarket axles will use factory specs, and that works fine. But the truth is the axle will decide camber, and you won't be able to do much about it at home other than check it.

Changing camber of a solid axle requires bending, a task that is still done regularly on trucks and can be done to a stock or dropped OEM axle. However, with aftermarket axles, the smart thing is to check with the manufacturer for their recommendation if camber is outside of specs.

Depending on the design, independent suspensions systems may have positive or negative camber when the car is static. Early Mustang II frontends ('71-'73) used 1/2-degree negative, while the later ('74-'78) used 1/4-degree; that's an acceptable range for most street rods, too. If you're using a custom IFS, consult the manufacturer for alignment specifications, but in any case, keep in mind that as the suspension compresses and rebounds, camber of an IFS changes. Most contemporary independent suspension systems are designed to gain negative camber on the outside wheel and positive camber on the inside as the car leans in a corner, so it is critical that the car be at ride height when any adjustments are made. Adjustments are usually made to street rod-style frontends by moving the upper control arms in or out.

Although most early cars with straight axles used positive caster, the amount varied. Ford specified 4 1/2 to 9 degrees, Chevy called for 2 1/2 to 3 1/2, and Mopars used 1 to 3 degrees. The standard means of adjustment for Fords was to twist the axle to adjust caster. Cars with parallel leaf springs up front (then and now) can use tapered shims between the main leaf and axle. With most Ford-based street rod applications, adjusting the caster is done with the radius rods.

By comparison to an early Ford solid axle, most street rod independent suspensions use less caster--Mustang frontends typically require 2 to 3 degrees. Again, check with the manufacturer for custom frontends, and adjustments are usually made with the upper control arm.

The last thing to be adjusted on any frontend is toe-in. Both independent and solid axle frontends will usually be set with 1/32 to an 1/8 inch of toe-in (early Fords were set at 1/16 to 3/32 inch, Mustang IIs call for an 1/8 inch). Toe adjustments are made with the tie-rod ends for both solid axles and independents, but before any changes are made, make sure the wheel bearings are properly adjusted and the steering gear is centered in its travel.



Read more: http://www.streetrodderweb.com/tech/...#ixzz1Nk3nCrC3
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Old 05-29-2011, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepi
What a load of crap, you do not want the tires to scuff down the road you just want the car to run straight with minimal resistance/drag to go fast....



Adjustments
When solid axle suspensions were the norm under production cars, they usually had a certain amount of positive camber. As examples, early Fords called for 1/4 to 1 degree, Chevys 1/2 to 1 1/2 degrees, and Mopars 1/4 to 3/4 degree. And while those figures are still valid, most contemporary radial tires generate the most cornering force with a trace of negative camber, around a 1/2-degree. So how much camber should your street have? Most aftermarket axles will use factory specs, and that works fine. But the truth is the axle will decide camber, and you won't be able to do much about it at home other than check it.

Changing camber of a solid axle requires bending, a task that is still done regularly on trucks and can be done to a stock or dropped OEM axle. However, with aftermarket axles, the smart thing is to check with the manufacturer for their recommendation if camber is outside of specs.

Depending on the design, independent suspensions systems may have positive or negative camber when the car is static. Early Mustang II frontends ('71-'73) used 1/2-degree negative, while the later ('74-'78) used 1/4-degree; that's an acceptable range for most street rods, too. If you're using a custom IFS, consult the manufacturer for alignment specifications, but in any case, keep in mind that as the suspension compresses and rebounds, camber of an IFS changes. Most contemporary independent suspension systems are designed to gain negative camber on the outside wheel and positive camber on the inside as the car leans in a corner, so it is critical that the car be at ride height when any adjustments are made. Adjustments are usually made to street rod-style frontends by moving the upper control arms in or out.

Although most early cars with straight axles used positive caster, the amount varied. Ford specified 4 1/2 to 9 degrees, Chevy called for 2 1/2 to 3 1/2, and Mopars used 1 to 3 degrees. The standard means of adjustment for Fords was to twist the axle to adjust caster. Cars with parallel leaf springs up front (then and now) can use tapered shims between the main leaf and axle. With most Ford-based street rod applications, adjusting the caster is done with the radius rods.

By comparison to an early Ford solid axle, most street rod independent suspensions use less caster--Mustang frontends typically require 2 to 3 degrees. Again, check with the manufacturer for custom frontends, and adjustments are usually made with the upper control arm.

The last thing to be adjusted on any frontend is toe-in. Both independent and solid axle frontends will usually be set with 1/32 to an 1/8 inch of toe-in (early Fords were set at 1/16 to 3/32 inch, Mustang IIs call for an 1/8 inch). Toe adjustments are made with the tie-rod ends for both solid axles and independents, but before any changes are made, make sure the wheel bearings are properly adjusted and the steering gear is centered in its travel.



Read more: http://www.streetrodderweb.com/tech/...#ixzz1Nk3nCrC3


I figured that this load of crap!!! was just that "Crap"!! so ididn't let that sink in to my thoughts. thanks i'll read what you sent .see how it sounds and thanks.
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