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  #466 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 12:20 PM
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I'm amazed

I just found your thread browsing for ideas on my own project, a 50 chevy pickup. It was like reading a great book, once i started i just couldn't stop.
I've learned more following you and the other posters in a couple of hours than I could ever imagine! This is my first project, and i'm starting on body work, using patch panels to repair cab corners and lower cowl sections. You talked about plug welding some of your pieces, could you elaborate?
Thanks for the very well done lessons!

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  #467 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbeins View Post
I just found your thread browsing for ideas on my own project, a 50 chevy pickup. It was like reading a great book, once i started i just couldn't stop.
I've learned more following you and the other posters in a couple of hours than I could ever imagine! This is my first project, and i'm starting on body work, using patch panels to repair cab corners and lower cowl sections. You talked about plug welding some of your pieces, could you elaborate?
Thanks for the very well done lessons!
Glad to bbeins. If you look at post 123 of this thread you will see where I drilled holes in the top piece to be welded. When it is welded to the bottom piece you weld through the holes to the bottom piece filling the hole. When you are done you have a weld that is pretty well hidden or looks very much like a factory spot weld.

John
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  #468 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 01:18 PM
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John, if you don't mind here is a little "Tip of the day" (we use to post these regularly five years ago) where I explain (no photos back then for me) a tip on plug welding that has worked wonders for me.

Tip of the day number ?

Brian
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  #469 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
John, if you don't mind here is a little "Tip of the day" (we use to post these regularly five years ago) where I explain (no photos back then for me) a tip on plug welding that has worked wonders for me.

Tip of the day number ?

Brian
Excellent advise. I read it several times to make sure I followed your system. I will have plenty of opportunities to put that to use.

I did finish the next row of mounts. I have yet to trim the ends and still have to repair the cross brace but the challenging part is done. At this point the part I hate is grinding the welds.

I did put on the roll of EZ Grind wire and used it for these last 2 mounts (except for the part I gas welded). It probably does grind a little easier but I am not sure it warrents the extra money. Also it burns through a little easier and I found myself lowering the temp a little. I don't hate it but don't think it is greater than sliced bread either.

I appriciate the advice and see from the number of thanks under your post there were many others who did also. Thanks again.

John







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  #470 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 07:18 PM
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Barb must have seen that dirt smudge on the table cloth too and told you to get your dirty parts over to the sink...

Good eval on the wire. I won't buy any. I had a roll of .023 wire that I bought several years ago that was supposed to be great for auto restoration and will weld thru rust and paint. It too burned thru easily and would arc back into the tip quite often. When it did that it would wind itself around the feed spool... This happened REPEATEDLY until I took it out and tossed it. I went back to .030 and had less problems with arc back. I later realized the ground clamp was junk right from Miller and changed it to a better one. That helped the burn back into the tip on start a lot, but the wire fed slowly after that and I eventually had to replace the entire hose and end because the wire had melted thru the liner when the ground wasn't good. Cost me $150 to replace it due to a cheap clamp from Miller. I wasn't happy and almost sold it to buy a Lincoln.
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  #471 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 07:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Too Many Projects View Post
Barb must have seen that dirt smudge on the table cloth too and told you to get your dirty parts over to the sink...

Good eval on the wire. I won't buy any. I had a roll of .023 wire that I bought several years ago that was supposed to be great for auto restoration and will weld thru rust and paint. It too burned thru easily and would arc back into the tip quite often. When it did that it would wind itself around the feed spool... This happened REPEATEDLY until I took it out and tossed it. I went back to .030 and had less problems with arc back. I later realized the ground clamp was junk right from Miller and changed it to a better one. That helped the burn back into the tip on start a lot, but the wire fed slowly after that and I eventually had to replace the entire hose and end because the wire had melted thru the liner when the ground wasn't good. Cost me $150 to replace it due to a cheap clamp from Miller. I wasn't happy and almost sold it to buy a Lincoln.
The biggest aggravation with a deal like that is the time it takes to figure out what it takes to correct the problem. Not that the wasted money is not important too.

John
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  #472 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 07:47 PM
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Reinforcement tab a geat idea.looks as good as any factory part and will work as good or better these will be exact fit,
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  #473 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 07:49 PM
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Welding galvanized

[quote=1971BB427;1704004]
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadbodyman View Post
No concerns about galvanize poisoning with the spray on stuff when welding?
I just came across this rebuild, sir you are a master .
I sort of skipped through, but will read every word tonight.
There's trick for welding galv. I learned as an apprentice.
Got sick one time welding galv. sleeves to galv. decking.
Told my journeyman the next morning, they sent out and got a quart of 1/2 & 1/2. I sipped on it regularly all day long, for the next two days while welding, and didn't fell ill again.
It's a stop gap measure to a short term problem.
Today I welded a couple pieces of galv. pipe, for an engine stand, as soon as I tasted the metallic in my mouth,I headed for the milk jug.
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  #474 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 07:53 PM
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[quote=tapkoote;1783922]
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1971BB427 View Post
I just came across this rebuild, sir you are a master .
I sort of skipped through, but will read every word tonight.
There's trick for welding galv. I learned as an apprentice.
Got sick one time welding galv. sleeves to galv. decking.
Told my journeyman the next morning, they sent out and got a quart of 1/2 & 1/2. I sipped on it regularly all day long, for the next two days while welding, and didn't fell ill again.
It's a stop gap measure to a short term problem.
Today I welded a couple pieces of galv. pipe, for an engine stand, as soon as I tasted the metallic in my mouth,I headed for the milk jug.
I have heard of that before. Interesting to here it works. I know I am going to do my darndest to not need it though.

Thanks for the kind words.

John
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  #475 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 08:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John long View Post
Excellent advise. I read it several times to make sure I followed your system. I will have plenty of opportunities to put that to use.

I did finish the next row of mounts. I have yet to trim the ends and still have to repair the cross brace but the challenging part is done. At this point the part I hate is grinding the welds.

I did put on the roll of EZ Grind wire and used it for these last 2 mounts (except for the part I gas welded). It probably does grind a little easier but I am not sure it warrents the extra money. Also it burns through a little easier and I found myself lowering the temp a little. I don't hate it but don't think it is greater than sliced bread either.

I appriciate the advice and see from the number of thanks under your post there were many others who did also. Thanks again.

John
Those braces look so damn good!

Yeah without photos it's kinda hard. Basically for those who can't figure out what the heck I was saying. Preparing for a plug weld would look exactly the same as removing a spot weld.

Using a drill like one of these.



You drill a hole in the top panel just like this.



Or this



Of course this only works when the metal below is thicker, like welding the floor to a crossmember under the body or that sort of thing.

Here is the "Basics of Basics" of spot weld removal where I got those photos. "Basics of Basics" Spot welds, removing welded on panels.

Brian
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  #476 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 09:27 PM
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Also Brian, I have found that other types of spot weld drill bits will work. Since there is no weld in a panel you are preparing, the spot weld drill acts like a hole saw. When it goes through the top panel it removes the plug. Of course it will not remove any of the lower panel as the drill you pictured would. But for preparing a new panel that may be fine.

John
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  #477 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 09:52 PM
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Yep I have photos of them in the "Basics" too.





The problem with that of course would be you would need to still clean up that metal to weld to. But if you were welding to thin metal this would most certainly be a way to go. The difference is if you have it clamped down tight and drill a hole like this the back side of the upper piece remains smooth at the edge of the hole and you don't need to grind it flat. Be it with this "hole saw" style or the other bits I showed. But of course the best part is it prepares the lower metal to weld to with the other bits. When that lower metal is thicker the first bits I showed cuts down into that lower metal providing a perfect welding condition.

Brian
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  #478 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
Yep I have photos of them in the "Basics" too.





The problem with that of course would be you would need to still clean up that metal to weld to. But if you were welding to thin metal this would most certainly be a way to go. The difference is if you have it clamped down tight and drill a hole like this the back side of the upper piece remains smooth at the edge of the hole and you don't need to grind it flat. Be it with this "hole saw" style or the other bits I showed. But of course the best part is it prepares the lower metal to weld to with the other bits. When that lower metal is thicker the first bits I showed cuts down into that lower metal providing a perfect welding condition.

Brian
Good point. I did not think about your type bit would also remove the paint in the lower piece. My bit would only remove a ring so you would indeed have to prepair the lower piece of metal...... Looks like I need to order a new spot weld bit.

Being able to paint the piece instead of using weldable primer will more than pay for the bit.

John
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  #479 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2013, 10:27 PM
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The ones in photo #2 are priceless in my opinion, yes they are about $25-35 each but they are priceless. The one on the left on this older, thicker metal would barely put a mark with that pilot tip. Those photos #12 and #13 remember are 22 gauge late model Honda or something, in 18 or 16 gauge it simply leaves you perfect conditions for a weld, shiny new metal, thinned a little, it is soooo nice. You can lay plug welds flat as can be.

Brian
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  #480 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 06:14 AM
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My experience with the hole saw style drills is that the tips break off on hard spot welds. They work good for prepping new panels for welding but I use the solid bit style for actual weld removal. From experience, I can tell when I am close to going thru the first panel and stop. On rusty seams, you will get a slight puff of red dust when you hit the second one and can stop, leaving that panel intact for welding too. I always try to leave the material on a panel I'm not replacing but if the bit goes thru, I have a plug weld vise grips and if that won't work, I have a piece of copper and magnets to use as a backer to get a clean "spot" weld in the hole.

As for welding a thick piece of metal to a thinner one, I use a circular motion, keeping the majority of the puddle on the heavier edge and filling the "hole" that way until I can end it in the center. I've had very good results, once I get the heat and feed set right for the situation. That is key to any welding job. Practice on scrap to get the settings that will work before "messing up" the actual part.
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