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  #481 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 06:21 AM
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Back to the actual work........John, once the current brace row is done, do you start on the front floor pan ?? Looks like it ends at that brace and the rear pan starts there ??

Looking back at the pics of your floor, I don't see a center hump panel like the pic I posted. Is there one on yours ?

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  #482 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Too Many Projects View Post
Back to the actual work........John, once the current brace row is done, do you start on the front floor pan ?? Looks like it ends at that brace and the rear pan starts there ??

Looking back at the pics of your floor, I don't see a center hump panel like the pic I posted. Is there one on yours ?
There was not. My floorboard was one piece including the center hump.

John
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  #483 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Too Many Projects View Post
My experience with the hole saw style drills is that the tips break off on hard spot welds. They work good for prepping new panels for welding but I use the solid bit style for actual weld removal. From experience, I can tell when I am close to going thru the first panel and stop. On rusty seams, you will get a slight puff of red dust when you hit the second one and can stop, leaving that panel intact for welding too. I always try to leave the material on a panel I'm not replacing but if the bit goes thru, I have a plug weld vise grips and if that won't work, I have a piece of copper and magnets to use as a backer to get a clean "spot" weld in the hole.
EXACTLY, personally, I haven't used one in 25 years. When I was doing that "Basics" and my co-worker showed me his I was thrilled to get a shot of it and it's use so I could show it in the "Basics" in case someone found it useful. The Spitznagel Spot Annihilator (yes that's what they call it!) is THE BOMB! All the components and tool you see is about $700 (it's a little cheaper now, when I bought the tool it was about $450 as I remember) and worth every dime to a pro doing collision work every day.



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As for welding a thick piece of metal to a thinner one, I use a circular motion, keeping the majority of the puddle on the heavier edge and filling the "hole" that way until I can end it in the center. I've had very good results, once I get the heat and feed set right for the situation. That is key to any welding job. Practice on scrap to get the settings that will work before "messing up" the actual part.
EXACTLY! Drilling the hole as laid out in the "tip of the day" and welding it like that produces a VERY nice weld. I should have explained it like that!

Brian
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  #484 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 08:36 AM
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I am DYING to see the floor it's self John! With the tricks you have shown us on the braces that I never would have thought of, I am DYING to see the floor!

Brian
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  #485 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 10:41 AM
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And John, sorry for the side track......back to your regularly scheduled 53 Chevy floor and braces replacement thread.

Brian
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  #486 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 07:17 PM
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And John, sorry for the side track......back to your regularly scheduled 53 Chevy floor and braces replacement thread.

Brian
My pleasure to gain some good advice

My intentions were to do some repair on the floorpan channel today but when I looked at it closely it became painfully clear that replacing both flat sections wood be easier than repairing it.

If you notice, these are not straight as they appear. They are level from the end to just inside of the body bolt and then they angle upward toward the center of the car.


You can see this puppy is pretty rough.
I made a good carboard template and transrerred it to the sheet metal. I had to notch the wider side. It was more than my shrinker jaws could do. I was able to shrink the narrow side.

Also, the bottom of the channel and body mount are level so I cut slots so I could bend the "joggle" that offsets it so they are level.



This part I was able to bend in the brakeNdmake sure it would fit the body mount.


The bends were to close to each other to make in the brake so I had to do the flanges by working it through the vice. If you take your time and do it in 6-7 passes you can really make some pretty good bends.


Here it is clamped together in the car. I am going to make the other side before I weld anything. It has occurred to me today that if I had enough pairs of vice grips I would not need to do any welding.


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  #487 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2013, 08:49 PM
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Just beautiful! Thanks John!

BB
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  #488 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 05:43 AM
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I am always intrigued by the spiderweb frame on that car. The top plate doesn't look very elegant either. Looks like when the occasional convertible came down the frame line a worker would cut out a piece from a flat sheet of steel, weld it to one side of the crossmember and beat it over to the other side to weld. Not that it needs to be elegant, but with the amount of rust present, I would use my cut off blade to sever the welds and remove it to treat the rust under it and inspect the center joints for cracks/rust. Once removed, the plate could be thoroughly cleaned in a blasting cabinet.
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  #489 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 06:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Too Many Projects View Post
I am always intrigued by the spiderweb frame on that car. The top plate doesn't look very elegant either. Looks like when the occasional convertible came down the frame line a worker would cut out a piece from a flat sheet of steel, weld it to one side of the crossmember and beat it over to the other side to weld. Not that it needs to be elegant, but with the amount of rust present, I would use my cut off blade to sever the welds and remove it to treat the rust under it and inspect the center joints for cracks/rust. Once removed, the plate could be thoroughly cleaned in a blasting cabinet.
You are correct TMP. It is an ugly set up. Once the body is solid it absolutely has to come off the frame. One thing for sure though, that has to be one stout frame.

This is a budget build but I would love to put a Heidt's front end under the car. I will have to have the frame sandblasted, etc. I have intentionally not thought a lot further than getting rid of the rust. By only thinking about the rust I do 2 things.

First, it keeps the project from becoming so big that I can't see light at the end of the tunnel.

Second, it makes the car desirable to someone else if my health should prevent me from finishing it. As it was when I brought it home, no one else would have wanted it.

When I get to the frame it also will be a project all to itself.

Thanks for the interest and feedback.

John
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  #490 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 07:07 AM
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"Stout" is right. They certainly didn't rely on the body to hold it's own shape as the convertibles evolved into.

You're sense of focus is better than mine. I would have to peel that top plate off before putting the floor pan on just out of curiousity. Maybe that's why I get "sidetracked'...

I hear ya on the frame off fo' sho'.
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  #491 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 07:09 PM
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Today I managed to make the other channel for the cross brace.



Fortunately the center hump was in fairly good condition and since I cut it out of the old brace it was small enough to go in my sand blast cabinet.



It came together nicely but if it looks to you like the RH side is further forward it is not an optical illusion. There is almost a 3/8 of an inch difference between the two sides. I am just too tired to follow up on it tonight but will have to figure it out tomorrow if I make it to the shop. Nothing is welded yet so it should be easily corrected.

John

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  #492 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 08:02 PM
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John...again, just amazed...This is a thread that everyone and anyone should read and study if they are considering building or rebuilding any part of a vehicle on there own, experienced or not. I'm sure you've mentioned what you used to do for a living in your working career but it slips my mind at the moment. I could see anything from engineer to teacher...even farmer...in Canada we have a saying, "if something is broken and you need it fixed right away, give it to a farmer...they've had to fix everything at a moments notice, other wise the crop wouldn't get off the field".

Always holds my attention John.

Ray
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  #493 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 08:12 PM
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Just fantastic John! I like your approach to biting off a little at a time until you look around and it's done! Amazing work as usual!
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  #494 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 08:14 PM
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John...again, just amazed...This is a thread that everyone and anyone should read and study if they are considering building or rebuilding any part of a vehicle on there own, experienced or not. I'm sure you've mentioned what you used to do for a living in your working career but it slips my mind at the moment. I could see anything from engineer to teacher...even farmer...in Canada we have a saying, "if something is broken and you need it fixed right away, give it to a farmer...they've had to fix everything at a moments notice, other wise the crop wouldn't get off the field".

Always holds my attention John.

Ray
Retired from Bell South in 1991 as a outside maintenance supervisor. Retired from Daimler Trucks North America (Freightliner) in 2008 as a Senior Customer Support Rep.......Jack of all trades, Master of none.
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  #495 (permalink)  
Old 09-25-2013, 08:29 PM
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Retired from Bell South in 1991 as a outside maintenance supervisor. Retired from Daimler Trucks North America (Freightliner) in 2008 as a Senior Customer Support Rep.......Jack of all trades, Master of none.
Well John, all I can say is, whoever you worked for must have been sorry to see you retire...the common sense approach in the way you are fabricating pieces for this build I'm sure would have been applied to your everyday working life. It's a rare trait and one, even though you say your a master of no trade, you have mastered.

It's a Sincere pleasure watching this vehicle come back to life.

On a side note, did you handle the Paint related warranty claims at all for Freightliner? They where fairly strong PPG user's in the 90's and early 2,000's if I'm right, they used the PPG Delfleet Polyurethane coating for their trucks.

Ray
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