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-   -   6 to 12 volt (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/6-12-volt-41684.html)

jeff51ford 06-16-2004 12:09 PM

6 to 12 volt
 
I have converted my 51 ford to using a 12 volt battery and alternator.
However, I need to know if I still use the voltage regulator?
Or do I run the source wires to the solenoid?
thanks!
Jeff

Quote:

Originally posted by jeff51ford
I have converted my 51 ford to using a 12 volt battery and alternator.
However, I need to know if I still use the voltage regulator?
Or do I run the source wires to the solenoid?
thanks!
Jeff

1 More thing, do I run the positive(source) wires from the solenoid/ignition side to the lights directly and mastre cylinder?
Thanks for the help.

willys36@aol.com 06-16-2004 12:10 PM

You MUST run a voltage regulator. If you used the typical GM alternator with the internal regulator, you won't need an external one. If you used a Chrysler or Ford that require an external regulator, then use one.

bullheimer 07-01-2004 12:39 PM

a 12v regulator at that. all your bulbs have to be 12V too and everything else. you could run it to those things. what is on the master cylinder? the brake light sw? are you changing the fuse panel i hope?

docvette 07-01-2004 05:50 PM

12 to 6 or vise versa..
 
[color=lightblue]Doc here::pimp:

If your not using one of those big Ceramic Dropping Resistors, (which I don't recommend for a hassle free system) You will need to change The Regulator (because the coils are 6 volt) if you don't have an Alternator with internal regulator. Is this an engine upgrade? (6 to V8)

As Bullheimer said, You will also need to change every light bulb in the system, from running lights to dash lights.

If your Starter is 6 volts, you need to upgrade that and the solenoid.

If your Windshield wipers are NOT vacuum, you need to change those.

The stock radio (If its still there), will need replacement .. PS don't throw it away either, those are now worth bucks if in good shape!

The Heater motor, If so equipped will need replacement.

Turnsignal Flashers (if so equipped) will need upgrades.

The Horn and Horn relay will need upgrade too.

You might Just Consider the replacement of (if you have it) The old Cotton insulated Wire too this stuff breaks down and shorts out. Most Assuredly, Replace the Battery Cables to handle the new higher current.

I assume you mean The Key when talking about the "Master Cylinder"?

Doc
:pimp:
[/color]

pzatchok 07-01-2004 10:51 PM

Use an inline resistor for the heater fan motor. The same for any origional dash guages. Check to see if the fuel guage can take 12 volts, if not use the same inline resistor.
Change the bulbs to 12 volt.
The 6v starter should work fine on 12v. No loss if it takes a few hundred starts to burn out. We use 6v ford starters on 12v all the time. Just don't run them real long. If it burns you should have a rewinder close by. Normally cheaper than off the shelf for hard to find parts.
Its a common thing to have a second battery in a car just for starting it. If thats what your worried about. Normally you can get quite a few starts out of one before you notice any change. Then just put the old charger on it over night and your good to go. Starts 12v but runs 6v

docvette 07-03-2004 05:08 PM

Motors Ect...
 
[color=lightblue]Doc here:pimp:

While DC motors Can and will run at 110% of overload... a lot of stuff they work with / from won't. IE , the Solenoid will not last that very long, or The speed control For the Heater Fan will not run properly. Besides, after the cost of 2 rebuilds on a Starter, you could have put a 12 volt in there anyway.

The Gauges can be replaced with a Nice Set of SW's at 12 volts pretty much easily done.

Using resistors at various parts of the harness is Convenient, but can become a nemesis when it becomes time to troubleshoot or replace parts... was that 6 volts or 12 volts...?? And resistance Causes heat, and heat Causes breakdowns over time.

It's much better to convert everything over at one time and enjoy years of trouble free service than to repair it a piece at a time constantly.

Doc
:pimp:
[/color]

rwruther 07-09-2004 02:29 PM

Here's what I did, and so far it's working fine. I have 12 volt battery which I let power the six volt starter on my 39 Pontiac. I have a 12 volt automotive regulator on the firewall and that's connected to my 12 volt generator, (not alternator). I have the stock gages. Now I figure an amp is an amp, so I hooked my amp gauge in series with my fuse block which supplies all 12 volt stuff. I come out of that to an "In-line Voltage Reducer"! This is a slick thing!

Unlike a big power resistor that drops volts and make heat, which you don't use for anything, this solid state thingie gobbles (almost) NO power at all! Cool a?!

I hooked what ever I wanted to run on six volts to the output of this In-line Voltage Reducer! The thing is usually used for, (and I quote), "incandescent lights, LED lighting, and heating elements". Other interesting data: 7 to 17 volts input, zero to 91 percent of input voltage output, 11 amps current output, no output voltage drift, 5 oz weight, power dissipation 0.038 watts... THATS LOW!

It cost me $53 including shipping. (From Backwoods bla bla bla see below)

What's it called and where do I buy mine?

"In-line Voltage Reducer" Made by "Zane" (DC Power Systems since 1990), 510 Fruitvale Ct#B, Grand Junction, Coloraedo 81504, 970-523-5170, FAX:same number

And you might find a dealer here:
"Backwoods Solar Electric Systems Co., 1395 Rolling Thunder Ridge, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864, 208 263-4290, FAX 208-265-4788

Sure hope this helps, I had a heck of a time digging it out of my files!

R

willys36@aol.com 07-09-2004 03:44 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by rwruther
Here's what I did, and so far it's working fine. I have 12 volt battery which I let power the six volt starter on my 39 Pontiac. I have a 12 volt automotive regulator on the firewall and that's connected to my 12 volt generator, (not alternator). I have the stock gages. Now I figure an amp is an amp, so I hooked my amp gauge in series with my fuse block which supplies all 12 volt stuff. I come out of that to an "In-line Voltage Reducer"! This is a slick thing!

Unlike a big power resistor that drops volts and make heat, which you don't use for anything, this solid state thingie gobbles (almost) NO power at all! Cool a?!

I hooked what ever I wanted to run on six volts to the output of this In-line Voltage Reducer! The thing is usually used for, (and I quote), "incandescent lights, LED lighting, and heating elements". Other interesting data: 7 to 17 volts input, zero to 91 percent of input voltage output, 11 amps current output, no output voltage drift, 5 oz weight, power dissipation 0.038 watts... THATS LOW!

It cost me $53 including shipping. (From Backwoods bla bla bla see below)

What's it called and where do I buy mine?

"In-line Voltage Reducer" Made by "Zane" (DC Power Systems since 1990), 510 Fruitvale Ct#B, Grand Junction, Coloraedo 81504, 970-523-5170, FAX:same number

And you might find a dealer here:
"Backwoods Solar Electric Systems Co., 1395 Rolling Thunder Ridge, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864, 208 263-4290, FAX 208-265-4788

Sure hope this helps, I had a heck of a time digging it out of my files!

R

Can do the same thing with a zener diode from Radio Shack for less than $1!http://www.click-smilies.de/sammlung...smiley-035.gif

jaj

39chevy 07-09-2004 07:33 PM

You can also buy a voltage drop reducer from the Filling Station which saves you a bit of money, good luck

28AV8 07-13-2004 10:14 AM

I'm currently updating a 1940 Ford to 12 volt, negative ground.
At this point power hasn't been turned on yet. But one thing no one has mentioned are the books available. I got one from Speedway that has helped. Two points: there is a problem with wiring in an alternator. Depending on how it's done, once you start the engine, it may not shut off with the key. You need either a diode, a relay, or a newer style of ignition switch.
Second point, with an alternator and a wide belt pulley on an older application, I needed a longer than stock fan belt. I learned it is a 'B' or 'BX' series v-belt. Stock is a B51, I used a BX53 (2 inches longer) could have used BX52.

willys36@aol.com 07-13-2004 10:26 AM

Books? We don't need no stinking books!http://forum.e46fanatics.com/images/smilies/slap.gif


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