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Old 01-08-2005, 07:40 AM
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79 trans am rear discs

I have a 1969 Camaro that I installed rear disc bakes from a 1979 Trans Am on. I installed them based upon an article I read from a September 1981 Hot Rod magazine. I had read the article and happened upon a rear end from a 79 TA in my local junk yard shortly after that. My problem is that I can't seem to get all of the leaks in the rear brakes stopped. I've got an adjustable proportioning valve and am using a new brake booster and master cylinder for a 79 TA. All of my rear lines from the proportioning valve back are new stainless steel from Ricks First Generation and Classic Industries. The front rear line is for a 1969 Camaro and the axle lines are for the TA. All of the leaks are at the calipers. They appear to be from where the adapter for the brake lines hook up. I've tried different rebuilt calipers from my local auto parts stores, new copper gaskets, and bleeder screws and met with some success but still have not been able to get rid of all of the leaks. Any words of wisdom form anyone who has had to deal with the rear disc brakes on a 1979 TA? I've got a lot of cash and time tied up in these brakes and would like to get them to not leak. I started this in 1981 long before conversion kits were readlily available. Life got in the way and I would hate to have to flush all my investment and get something from Stainless Steel Brakes or someone like that. Thanks for any help anyone can be.

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Old 01-08-2005, 07:47 AM
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Welcome to the board. You are new so donít know the ins and outs yet. This forum is intended for general introductions only. Tech questions posted here donít get the coverage they deserve. Repost your question in the proper forum, Suspension - Brakes - Steering in this case, and it will have a good chance of being answered.
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Old 01-08-2005, 02:40 PM
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moving to brakes forum.....
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Old 01-08-2005, 08:29 PM
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You would be suprised how much you have to torque the banjo bolts to crush the copper washers. If they arn't tight enough they will leak. Brake bleeders seal with very little pressure but those banjo bolts need a more torque then you would think. I noticed you got new copper washers. That is good because they should be replaced every time they are removed.
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Old 01-10-2005, 06:51 AM
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They do have to be pretty tight.

There are also replacement copper washers I have found to be too thin for my liking, and dont seem to seal well.

On rebuilt calipers, their procedure can sometimes affect the surface where the washer sits, and it can be rougher than it should be. It probably has raised rings which help the seal, but I have run into some where I had to wire brush them. Just do it with the plastic plug in the hole. Sometimes I have to chase the threads too, which is kind of scary to me.

On stainless lines, I have trouble getting them to seal because they are so hard. Sometimes loosen and retighten helps, but if the leaks are at the copper, that wont help

The T/A rear calipers are famous for leaking where the E-brake bolts in, even on new-rebuilds. They usually have a bit of moisture on the pad side too, under where the little center plug is on the piston, but that's "supposed" to be normal after miles of service.
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Old 01-10-2005, 07:23 AM
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I just watched a show, Trucks on tv and they addresed this. If you are using SS lines then there is a special flare needed, if you used a regular flare tool it will leak. Now I am not a brake expert and as said the info was on a tv show but I figured I would pass it on.
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Old 01-10-2005, 06:32 PM
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Old american cars used a 45deg double flare on the hard lines. If you buy a set of braided stainless flex lines made for your car most likely they will come with 45deg fittings.

If you are using "AN" fittings they are all 37deg and will need a special flare tool.

I have never been able to make a decient 45deg double flare in stainless hard line. I just use regular steel or go "all the way" and use AN stuff with the stainless.
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Old 01-20-2005, 09:58 AM
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fixed

After 4 different calipers for the left rear I think I got my problem fixed. Each of the first 3 rebuilt calipers had something wrong with them that they leaked. I haven't driven the car yet since its Winter in this part of the country but at least I haven't detected any leaks for the past 5 days which is a good thing. Thanks to everyone for all their input.
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