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Old 06-09-2010, 12:39 PM
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88 camry

so money is tight and my truck recently met a 3 point buck on the highway and is sitting in the junkyard. since im still in school and dont have the cash to go buy a new car mom has decided to give me her 1988 camry. this car was parked 3 years ago and never moved. i know for a fact it needs a new battery and a complete tune up but would i be safe with just flushing everything, trans, oil, radiator, brakes, new plugs, and such or is thing going to need parts? it ran just fine when parked.

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Old 06-09-2010, 06:56 PM
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Change motor oil, renew battery. Start it and drive it. See how it does. Rodents and moisture can do alot to a car if its been sitting for a while. Make sure all the fluids are full and then change them out as $$$ permits. Four wheels beats two heals
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Old 06-09-2010, 07:44 PM
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I defiantly would not do a transmission flush. I have heard too many stories about the transmission going within 100 miles after being flushed.
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Old 06-09-2010, 09:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdog7373
I defiantly would not do a transmission flush. I have heard too many stories about the transmission going within 100 miles after being flushed.

Been doing complete transmission fluid exchanges and services for 25 years on a daily basis. And still have never been blamed for a trans failure after changing the fluid(big knock on wood!). But, I also don't service a trans that has problems I just can't grab a hold of the "new fluid killed the trans" concept. Especially, when the people that blame or are fixing the so called new fluid failures, don't give any actual theory or even a hypothesis of why this or that failed. Its just, "the trans died". Good explanation...

Myself, I will service or fluid exchange any trans that meets my criteria of a maintenance service, and not a crisis service...

But thats a debate that will go on till the sun burns out... Like crank thrust failure from a torque converter
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Old 06-10-2010, 08:55 AM
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I was told that when you flush the trans, you take the oil that is already lubricating the gears off the gears and the new oil doesn't take its place well, or something like that, idk. It just seems safer to just change the fluid instead of flushing it.
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Old 06-10-2010, 07:43 PM
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Hi
Now, when I say flush, I mean "fluid exchange". A flush is what "goofy lube" sells. They don't drop the pan and change the filter and it cannot be back-flushed either. So, they don't even know what condition the trans is in. They don't qualify the fluid exchange with a question-air, road test or pan inspection either. So many people go in expecting and flush or service will repair a transmission thats "acting strange". Let me tell you, it don't fix a failing trans, if it indeed is failing. Anyways, the trans drops dead a little later and goofy lube takes the hit. To me, either because they didn't qualify the fluid exchange or a tech botched the job. But to me, just exchanging the fluid has no merit for failure. Maybe it did 50-60 years ago, when varnish was a problem, but not with the modern fluids.

A pro will verify no customer complaints with the trans, road test the vehicle, then drop the pan, inspect it for strange things, change the filter, install pan, then unhook the cooler and run new fluid though trans till it pushes the old fluid out the torque converter and cooler. Not using any additives or chemicals. You get about 90% new fluid exchanged give or take. Peace
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Old 06-11-2010, 07:24 AM
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30 years in the trenches:

A trans "flush" will not remove dirt or debris as if the filter is doing its job, the filter will still remain plugged after the fact and you'll never know without dropping the pan.

While a pan drop and filter swap won't change all the fluid, it DOES change enough of it to replace the wear protectors and additives provided the trans isn't cooked between fluid changes.

I've yet to see ONE SINGLE case of manufacture suggesting a "trans flush". This was an Iffy Lube type scam created as a marketing plot.

When is a "flush" required? How about after a trans takes on water from a flood or leaking radiator. Did you drive it? Whoops... It's too late. (Even if not driven, it's too late... water/coolant dissolves the glue holding the clutches together) How about after overheating it? Whoops, if it's going to die, flushing it or not won't change that. There is ONE time a flush is required: When you have money to waste and don't really care about your car.

You'll see nearly every transmission specialty shop out there doing brakes and such now. Are they starving because flushes make the trans live longer? Nope. They're starving because transmissions are built better. Service it as needed and it'll live its expected life. Hope that clears the air a bit.

The only downside here is the car is an 88. Not a lot of life expected from it so be happy with what it offers and expect some quirks. And thank your mom.
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Old 06-11-2010, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KMatch

You'll see nearly every transmission specialty shop out there doing brakes and such now. Are they starving because flushes make the trans live longer? Nope. They're starving because transmissions are built better. Service it as needed and it'll live its expected life. Hope that clears the air a bit.
Don't forget, the big box stores, Jasper, Certified and OEMs supplying transmissions to the parts hangers Thats changed the industry too, IMO.
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Old 06-11-2010, 02:56 PM
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im not expecting this thing to last me 10 years just need a drivable car to from school 9 miles away. so change the oil and such and call it a day??? if so thats pretty cheap. its had a non op so im lookin at about 300 or so to get this thing on the road. thanks much gentlemen.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:32 PM
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I'd be real leery of the tires. If they've been sitting still with weight on them for 3 years, they could be flat-spotted. You might not notice it if it's not real bad, but they can still be weakened enough to throw the tread off after you drive on them some.
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Old 06-21-2010, 10:33 AM
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Its been sitting awhile so the brakes may be rusted tight, it would be a good idea to at least pull the wheels and make sure they are free...flush and bleed the brake fluid since it absorbs water from the atmostphere. Gasoline in the tank will be varnish...drain it. Coolant and oil is likely fine but check them carefully for water contamination, an oil change for the motor is a good idea...I would leave the trans oil unless there is a problem.

Before you start cranking it over with the new battery it would be a good idea to squirt some storage spray into the cylinders after pulling the plugs just so it doesn't start up dry. Make sure no rodents have taken up home in the air box, bees and other insects like those small openings to build a nest in so be careful under the hood...I've more than once been surprised by a fully operational wasp/hornets nest when I popped an air filter box cover and had to high tail it to safety.

Make sure the parking brake is functional since they like to freeze up after sitting for awhile, make sure it works properly before setting out and using it...more than once had to unfreeze a set in some parking lot somewhere. Once you get some good fuel in her a full can of Seafoam in the first few tanks can help degum the injectors once its running, don't expect full performance until its run awhile and had a few tanks go through her.

Tires are likely shot unless they were stored inside somewhere, sidewall cracks means you need to replace ASAP but even if they aren't cracked they will hard as a rock from ozone damage depending on how long it was stored. The good news is I have had really good luck with Japanese cars being stored and they start right up and other than a bit of brake corrosion usually are good to go. Usually more brake/parking brake issues with domestics.

Might be a good idea to make sure the chassis hasn't rotted to powder, the unibody cars have a tendency to turn to dust if they were stored in a field where wet grass grew around them, poke around with a pick to make sure its safe to drive. Checking all the battery connections for corrosion goes without saying, make sure you don't have rotten ground straps or motor to chassis straps...nothing worse than getting it running and have it die on you somewhere because the ground is bad and just needs a wire brushing to make good contact.

Good luck.
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