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Old 06-23-2008, 03:45 PM
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Advice on sealing new timing cover

Hello guys I am getting ready to put my new timing cover on my 350 chevy and I was able to get my old one off with out having to drop my oil pan any. I did loosen my first 4 bolts on each side but the pan did not move and I did not want to do any more then I already have.

Ok my dad used Black gasket silicone maker on the old cover for the front oil pan seal and did not use the thick type rubber seal. What I am thinking of doing is putting a little bead of gasket maker on the lip of my oil pan then put a thick bead on my timing cover at the bottom and when I put my cover on I have to slightly angel it then push it straight in to align it on the dowel pins.

Question is will the two beads seal up as one thick bead or not? Also I used gasket remover spray on the old silicone and got just a tid bit on the side rail pan gaskets at the corner where it starts the lip of the oil pan.

It was just on the gasket that stuck out in the front of the oil pan where it mates with the block. I have dried it up as best as I could with a shop rag should it be safe then? Please any advice on how I should use my gasket maker so it does not leak would help. I am doing all of this along with my water pump tomorrow.

Thanks guys.
Eric
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Old 06-23-2008, 05:17 PM
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Eric....if you are really, really, really good, you can do it like you state. Done it like that myself when pulling the pan is just too much hassle.
One more thing I do is snip the corners off the BACK edge of the tack welded-on metal strip that makes up the trough that holds the stock type rubber seal. You only need to snip off maybe an 1/8". It gives you a little "sneeking" room when putting it back on.

If you do it that way, just make sure you let it dry overnight so as not to get any oil on it.
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Old 06-23-2008, 05:30 PM
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Agreed it can be done, However just remember sometime the long way is the short way. I'm not trying to jinx you but evertime I try to cut a corner I end up paying for it later., Just something to ponder on.
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Old 06-23-2008, 07:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmark
Eric....if you are really, really, really good, you can do it like you state. Done it like that myself when pulling the pan is just too much hassle.
One more thing I do is snip the corners off the BACK edge of the tack welded-on metal strip that makes up the trough that holds the stock type rubber seal. You only need to snip off maybe an 1/8". It gives you a little "sneeking" room when putting it back on.

If you do it that way, just make sure you let it dry overnight so as not to get any oil on it.
Yep thats what I do.
I recamend "Right Stuff" gasket maker it is black and expensive but very worth it.
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Old 06-23-2008, 07:41 PM
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Well I don't want to damage my cover. I got a cloyes cam button cover for $110.00 dont want to chance that. I am going to just go for it and see if I can get it the first time. I am basically am going to make a thick seal on the timing cover then put a small bead on the oil pan lip then after the cover is on and I tighten it down. I am going to put a small bead around the bottom of the cover again for extra insurance. It won't look pretty but if it seals then I am happy. I cant keep my engine spotless but i don't need leaks. That is what my dad from what I can tell after he changed my cam out last summer. Thanks for the info guys I appreciate it.
Eric
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Old 06-24-2008, 07:41 AM
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just remember sometime the long way is the short way. I'm not trying to jinx you but evertime I try to cut a corner I end up paying for it later
Yea, trying to save a minute can cost you hours. Most times I think it is pure lazy, a stumbling block that prohibits proper procedure... which usually leads to other problems that end up eating more time than if just done the right and 'easy way'. What's the hurry?
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Old 06-24-2008, 08:04 AM
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Just curious... Where is it that you think all of the excess silicone is going to go???????????????? Oil pan thats where.....Then you will have a can of worms.
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Old 06-24-2008, 08:13 AM
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It can be done and it sounds like you will be careful enough to make it work. Thousands of guys do it all the time. Let us know how it works out.
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Old 06-24-2008, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stroke
Yea, trying to save a minute can cost you hours. Most times I think it is pure lazy, a stumbling block that prohibits proper procedure... which usually leads to other problems that end up eating more time than if just done the right and 'easy way'. What's the hurry?
Very true words that stands the test of time. Factory builds seem to be able to put assemblies together, from rear ends to engine blocks without all that goop. A practice I have used for 30 + years and works very well, also it sure makes the tear down easy if you have to revisit the area again...... never saw a Real race car team use that goop ............... professional car teams just to clarify, not that it might or could happen OCCASIONALLY, LIMITED but not a first choice or common practice. Good clean, accurate assembly practices will save loads of time and eliminates future failures................. for what it is worth, the advise was free, so the value is relative.
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Old 06-24-2008, 08:55 AM
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Goop

there's the right way ,the wrong way and the i'll get by for aweek way. The right way is drop oil pan use all rubber gaskets and not worry again about it, or use #2 gasket sealer by permatex and cork gaskets like old days, or do it the way that you are describing and in 3 weeks place a cookie sheet under your rod in the garage evey time you park to catch the drip it's all good it's just the right way takes maybe 20.00 dolllars more and an hour of time and you won't be burdoned again
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Old 06-24-2008, 08:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnrrodscustoms
there's the right way ,the wrong way and the i'll get by for aweek way. The right way is drop oil pan use all rubber gaskets and not worry again about it, or use #2 gasket sealer by permatex and cork gaskets like old days, or do it the way that you are describing and in 3 weeks place a cookie sheet under your rod in the garage evey time you park to catch the drip it's all good it's just the right way takes maybe 20.00 dolllars more and an hour of time and you won't be burdoned again

The "right way" is the way that gets the job done correctly. If someone can do it the way he's suggesting, there is nothing wrong with it. Mine is going on 3 years now done that way and dry as an old bone.
If the engine needs to be raised or worse yet, removed to get the pan off, why mess with it. Give it a try and most likely it will work fine.
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Old 06-24-2008, 09:39 AM
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NOOO PROBLEM here i was 18 years old once too.
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Old 06-24-2008, 10:32 AM
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Well I would try a rubber seal but i can not drop my oil pan without disturbing the side rail gaskets along with the rear. They have been glued to the oil pan rail so as to stay in place. Trying to lower the pan will only rip the gasket and taking out my enginge in an s10 is not fun. It can be done but I don't have the time to do all that or the equipment. Gasket maker has been used on all of my engine builds and I have never had any problems with them leaking up front. Just my two cents but there are different ways what works for people I guess and I respect what works for you. I wanted to use a one piece gasket but they did not have one that would work for my pan. I am going to try to see how a rubber gasket works but we will see. i will post back after its all said and done. Thanks for the comments though good or bad it all helps in making decisions in what I will do. Take care guys.
Eric
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Old 06-24-2008, 11:11 AM
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WHat I like to do if I have a timing cover that won't seal, and alot of the cheap chrome ones leak like crazy, I put a decent bead around the cover and install it will a gasket but I don't tighten the cover down until the silicone has had a chance to set up for awhile. Like 4-6hours or so, this way it is still flexible but will not squeeze out from under the cover and get into your oilpan, pickup, and pump. Then I make sure I use the least amount of torque necessary to seal it then I check them a couple of times after break in and they are good to go.

However if using quality parts like your timing cover then you shouldn't have this problem and will want to use the least amount possible.
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Old 06-24-2008, 11:21 AM
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Thousands of guys do it all the time
IMHO, those are usually the ones with the clogged pick-ups, oil galleys, thermostats etc etc etc. That's been my experience over the last 30 years.

What's wrong with pulling the engine anyway? It's your own personal vehicle and you are not being charged or charging a fee to yourself. Drop and gimme 50!
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