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Old 04-07-2014, 01:49 AM
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advice on TIG tungsten and rod size

I'm trying to read up on this and figure out what to order. I think it sounds like I need a 1/16" tungsten and er70s6 rod, but I'm not sure how thick. I will be welding sheet metal primarily.

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Old 04-07-2014, 06:41 AM
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Tungsten, cups, collets and gas lenses are relatively cheap. Get a set so you can use 1/16" and 3/32" tungstens. ER70s2 rod is cheap too. Get a pound of each. I am always swapping out Tungsten sizes, it all depends what I am working on.
T.J.
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Old 04-07-2014, 08:33 AM
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welding info

The miller Tig book is usually for sale for under $ 20 in the store or down load here for free
http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf

Another good resource is from Jody Collier. former welding instructor. a free 10 min video each week, and he has done an evaluation of everlast equipment
http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/...ss-welder.html
Welding Tips and Tricks - TIG, MIG, Stick and a pantload of other info
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:02 AM
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anyone help with what size rod to use for sheet metal?
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
anyone help with what size rod to use for sheet metal?
Have you ever TIged before. Have you watched Jody's vids. I would say start with 1/16" but your fit up needs to be damn near perfect. Not like MIG where you can have larger gaps.
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:43 AM
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lay wire

I still prefer oxy acety for thin work. , but I am almost as old as Bill Hines who still stays with oxy acety , and I am not as steady as I was over 50 years ago. touch the tungsten in the puddle or touch the rod to the tungsten and I have to stop and regrind. The lay wire technique is to lay a larger size wire over the joint, tack the ends and melt it in to make the bead, and make sure you get penetration, a good bead. and I can guide the tig torch with both hands. you don't get the stack of dimes look but to me a good smooth bead is ok.
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Old 04-07-2014, 10:47 AM
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I still prefer oxy acety for thin work. , but I am almost as old as Bill Hines who still stays with oxy acety , and I am not as steady as I was over 50 years ago. touch the tungsten in the puddle or touch the rod to the tungsten and I have to stop and regrind. The lay wire technique is to lay a larger size wire over the joint, tack the ends and melt it in to make the bead, and make sure you get penetration, a good bead. and I can guide the tig torch with both hands. you don't get the stack of dimes look but to me a good smooth bead is ok.
u want a good way to practice tig welding , get a clean piece of paper , a very sharp pencil , and 2 washers , one 1/8th thick and one 1/16th thick
u put the paper so down so its longer left to right and put the washer at one one , then u put the pencil in it and move the pencil in circles inside the washer while slowly moving it across the paper.
every pencil mark on the paper is a trip u would have made to the grinder to grind the tungsten clean

start with the thicker washer , until u can get it down really well then move to the thinner washer


i used this trick when i first started welding years ago and it does help

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Old 04-07-2014, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by TJSBBC View Post
Have you ever TIged before. Have you watched Jody's vids. I would say start with 1/16" but your fit up needs to be damn near perfect. Not like MIG where you can have larger gaps.
no, haven't tig welded before but that's why I want to get something cheap for now. Maybe I'll with a bigger tungsten in case there's little gaps here and there? I have a lot to learn.
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Old 04-08-2014, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
no, haven't tig welded before but that's why I want to get something cheap for now. Maybe I'll with a bigger tungsten in case there's little gaps here and there? I have a lot to learn.
Larger diameter tungstens are typically for higher amperage contingent upon the torch rating you are using. Many have posted some good advice here such as downloading the Miller TIG handbook and watching Jody's videos. The handbook will answer a lot of your questions regarding filler rod size and tungsten size as there are many charts and tables in it.The rule of thumb is 1 amp per thou of material thickness up to a certain point. I would not even think about welding sheet metal until you can run the puddle around without filler on some thicker 1/4" or 3/8" steel plate. These test plates (coupons) need to be sanded clean of mill scale/rust/etc. so it is shiny even before thinking of striking an arc. Practice practice practice is all I can say. I have been tigging for over 10 years and I still call it practice. I always am trying to improve everytime I flip my helmet down.

Also as I stated before, cheaping out on a TIG machine(Chi-com) have made beginners more frustrated because of the machine iteself and hinder learning.
If you want to learn more also join weldingweb dot com.
T.J.
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Old 04-09-2014, 12:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TJSBBC View Post
Larger diameter tungstens are typically for higher amperage contingent upon the torch rating you are using. Many have posted some good advice here such as downloading the Miller TIG handbook and watching Jody's videos. The handbook will answer a lot of your questions regarding filler rod size and tungsten size as there are many charts and tables in it.The rule of thumb is 1 amp per thou of material thickness up to a certain point. I would not even think about welding sheet metal until you can run the puddle around without filler on some thicker 1/4" or 3/8" steel plate. These test plates (coupons) need to be sanded clean of mill scale/rust/etc. so it is shiny even before thinking of striking an arc. Practice practice practice is all I can say. I have been tigging for over 10 years and I still call it practice. I always am trying to improve everytime I flip my helmet down.

Also as I stated before, cheaping out on a TIG machine(Chi-com) have made beginners more frustrated because of the machine iteself and hinder learning.
If you want to learn more also join weldingweb dot com.
T.J.
ok, I'll start reading that miller handbook tonight, thanks. Btw, lots of reviews on that Canadian Everlast welder and it fares well against smaller Miller Machines that cost 10x more. I'm really tempted.
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:18 AM
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JC classes

A lot of the California junior colleges offer night welding classes, I took one a few years ago, the cost was only $ 50 and I used more than that amount of argon, rod and electricity. They had us start with Oxy acety welding. It's more forgiving, learn rod and torch control.
Jody collier from welding tips and tricks sells a "tig Finger" a finger protector heat shield that is very useful for welding at higher settings. Tig gloves are thinner for better rod control but don't offer as much heat protection.
http://www.weldmongerstore.com/tig-finger/

Last edited by timothale; 04-09-2014 at 08:24 AM.
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Old 04-09-2014, 10:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
ok, I'll start reading that miller handbook tonight, thanks. Btw, lots of reviews on that Canadian Everlast welder and it fares well against smaller Miller Machines that cost 10x more. I'm really tempted.
Don’t believe the marketing materials you read from these companies. No such thing as a Chi-com machine made in Canada, all these machines come into port on a barge to California. You still will get the same crap customer service once (and it will) it dies on you. Even some of the “USA” made machines has overseas parts in them, however when something goes wrong with a USA machine you can get customer service to help you in parts assistance and some documentation as well.
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Old 04-09-2014, 10:15 AM
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what about Eastwood? I hear they are Tung Yang as well but I also hear their customer service is good? Just trying to save some money here. I'm not a tig welder by profession.
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Old 04-10-2014, 08:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timothale View Post
The miller Tig book is usually for sale for under $ 20 in the store or down load here for free
http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf

Another good resource is from Jody Collier. former welding instructor. a free 10 min video each week, and he has done an evaluation of everlast equipment
MultiProcess Welder
Welding Tips and Tricks - TIG, MIG, Stick and a pantload of other info
that miller handbook is great, thanks for that. I think I got it narrowed down to The Eastwood Tig 200 DC or maybe the AC/DC 200, which is a lot more. It's the 3 year warranty.
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Old 04-10-2014, 08:22 PM
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Looks like I'm settled on The TIG 200 DC. Although it doesn't weld aluminum it's ok. I've had my mig welder for many years and haven't welded anything aluminum or needed to. It sucks to not have aluminum welding capabilities but I'm not a welder, don't get paid to fabricate, and am not gonna buy aluminum to fabricate with. It's a no brainer to pay less for what I need as opposed to what I might need. This welder is $500 and the AC/DC is $869. With a 3 year warranty I think I'm making a good decision. I'll make a thread of my experiences with the welder and maybe it can help another clueless guy out there.

Anyhow, today on lunch I caught myself doing the motions of tig welding with my fingers and thought, "I need to get this." I've got great coordination and the willingness to learn so I'm off on my journey.
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