Air Compressor / Dry Air - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Garage - Tools
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-15-2013, 07:48 PM
Mac88's Avatar
"Drive It Until It Breaks"
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: North Carolina
Age: 40
Posts: 168
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Air Compressor / Dry Air

I was looking through the forum and found an old post that addressed the problem I needed help with, but did'nt fully answer my question. I have a regular two car garage and not a large shop. I'm trying to figure a to get 50ft. of pipe so I can run my air through a dryer but because of the size of my garage, it's kind of difficult. I read an article where someone was saying they built a copper cooling board with 50ft of copper piping. That sounds like it would work, but my question is exactly how could this board be built without having low spots that would hold water? If anyone has pictures, it would be greatly appreciated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 06-15-2013, 09:58 PM
66GMC's Avatar
Get in, sit down, hang on
 

Last journal entry: Cab Removal
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Olds, Alberta Canada
Age: 56
Posts: 2,761
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 32
Thanked 89 Times in 84 Posts
I'm not sure if you are talking about my "cooling board" or not, but I built mine based on another member's idea here on HR.



My airline is fairly short ... just runs the length of the wall on one side of my 24' x 34' garage. The relatively dry supply line is mounted up high on the wall, and has vertical drops to the outlets. Note the union at the termination of the overhead supply line, as well as the spare lengths of copper tubing on top of my cabinets ... just in case I decide to plumb the rest of my shop some day.



These outlets are mounted on tees, with a length of tubing below them. Each one has a drain valve to remove accumulated moisture. I have been more than happy with this setup, as moisture rarely even makes it as far as the water trap.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2013, 06:44 AM
Mac88's Avatar
"Drive It Until It Breaks"
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: North Carolina
Age: 40
Posts: 168
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re

66GMC,
Thanks for the response. I believe this is what I was looking at and I think it would be the answer to my space problem. You dont have any problems with condesation collecting in the board? This looks like exactly what I need, thanks. I just did'nt want black pipe running all over the place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2013, 07:06 AM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: General Motors transmissions Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: near Yellowstone park
Posts: 4,039
Wiki Edits: 27

Thanks: 10
Thanked 208 Times in 195 Posts
propane bottle

Someone here on Hotrodders posted a desicant type dryer made from a propane bottle and filled with kitty litter. I welded up the fittings on a medium RV bottle and have the kitty litter but didn't get it finished before we came North for the summer Farm work. I have one of the clear plastic canisters to run after the bottle that changes color when it gets saturated with moinsure. Moisture in the air lines did $ 100 damage to the plasma cutter tips in 2 seconds. I have been thinking about looking at a small refrigerant dryer if I get a progect far enough along to Paint with something beside primer. When I was south a few years ago I signed up for a "Paint your car" college class but it was cancelled. Most class fees were cheaper that the overhead to heat and run your own shop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2013, 07:12 AM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: General Motors transmissions Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: near Yellowstone park
Posts: 4,039
Wiki Edits: 27

Thanks: 10
Thanked 208 Times in 195 Posts
inverted U

Air lines are recommendet to slope down hill to an end of line drain and have the take offs plumbed in an inverted U, first go up out of the main line, then down to the hose connection. I have an auto drain valve on my tank but it still doesn't get enough moisture out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2013, 08:48 AM
Mac88's Avatar
"Drive It Until It Breaks"
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: North Carolina
Age: 40
Posts: 168
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re

I'm just looking for a simple system to keep moisture from my air tools and blaster. I'm a Deputy Sheriff full time and I only work on my Mustang when I have a little free time, so I would prefer not to put alot of money in top notch, professional grade systems. I saw a refrigerated dryer at HF for $300. I may end up going that route. For the amount of work I do, I really dont need it, but I like things to work when I need them. I like the idea of the cooling board, but I think as far as cost, after buying all the materials to build it, I could probably go with the refrigerated dryer and pay about the same. Thanks for the response.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2013, 10:06 PM
66GMC's Avatar
Get in, sit down, hang on
 

Last journal entry: Cab Removal
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Olds, Alberta Canada
Age: 56
Posts: 2,761
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 32
Thanked 89 Times in 84 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac88 View Post
You dont have any problems with condesation collecting in the board?
No, I don't.

The 4 ball valves are normally closed, which forces the air up and down those 3 or 4 loops.

Moisture drops out of each of those loops due to cooling and gravity, then collects in the tube directly above each of those valves. Opening those valves one at a time blows off any accumulation, which exits through the horizontal "manifold" pipe at the bottom.

1.)I drain the compressor tank, which is where the vast majority of water collects.

2.) I blow off each of the 4 ball valves on the cooling tower. The amount of condensate diminishes (as I would expect) as I progress.

3.) I check the filter/drier, and rarely find that much if any moisture has made it that far.

4.) Before I plug in any air tool, I crack the ball valve below the outlet just to be 100% sure that I'm using dry air.

The caveat here is that this is just my home garage/workshop, and the most air-usage-intensive project to date has been a bit of sandblasting with a small hand-held spot blaster and spraying some paint with a siphon gun.

Other than that ... filling tires and using the blow-gun is about the extent of my weekly or monthly usage. That 18.5 CFM compressor is overkill, but I got it cheap!

I do plan on using it for a much bigger job, hopefully soon. The plan is to get my hands on a 20-gal pressurized sandblaster and re-blast my pickup cab. I have done this before using a nearly identical compressor. The compressor ran pretty much non-stop, but it did seem to keep up. That will be a good test, I think, of how well this "cooling tower" really works.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2013, 11:19 PM
Mac88's Avatar
"Drive It Until It Breaks"
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: North Carolina
Age: 40
Posts: 168
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
66GMC,
Thanks, I'm going to run down to run down to Lowes tomorrow and try to get the materials to build one of these. I think I'm going to try and use gator bites or some type of compression fittings. I never have alot of luck with soldering. It may cost a little more but I think it's worth it as opposed to doing all that work just to find leaks.

I'm only working in a small garage and I only do small blasting jobs too, so this will be perfect. Thanks again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 06-17-2013, 01:49 AM
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Ford axle ratio codes
Last journal entry: Rear Suspension
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Prattsville
Posts: 6,268
Wiki Edits: 31

Thanks: 2
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts
Make sure the gator bites are rated for that kind of pressure.. Gator bites are about the greatest invention ever for quick fixes to water lines, but I have never used them for air pressure
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 06-17-2013, 07:08 AM
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: 700r4 still running strong
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Lakehills Tx
Posts: 458
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 46
Thanked 32 Times in 32 Posts
I used 3/4 steel pipe that I bought at Lowes, they can cut an thread the ends for you, and have all the fittings also. My compressor is on one side of my garage door, ran the pipe up the side then over an down to the other side where the filter is.The pipe is slanted towards the compressor above the garage door so any water runs back to there. This cures any water issues but theirs going to be some water vapor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 06-17-2013, 03:12 PM
66GMC's Avatar
Get in, sit down, hang on
 

Last journal entry: Cab Removal
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Olds, Alberta Canada
Age: 56
Posts: 2,761
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 32
Thanked 89 Times in 84 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt167 View Post
Make sure the gator bites are rated for that kind of pressure.. Gator bites are about the greatest invention ever for quick fixes to water lines, but I have never used them for air pressure
Ditto!

Soldering copper pipe really isn't all that hard if you have:
1.) A good propane torch
2.) A (approx) 6" square peice of scrap tin (perhaps with some sort of insulated handle oe even vise grips) to sheild heat from the work area behind the pipe.
3.) Soldering flux paste
4.) some emery tape abrasive roll (180 - 240 grit?)
5.) Acid core solder for plumbing, NOT rosin core.

Bob Vila's instructions

In addition to his instructions:

I like do a trial fit, and use a sharpie marker to make sure the rotation is lined up properly. I also try to plan for the need to have swivel joints or unions wherever disassembly might be nessecary (i.e. ball valves, filters, hose reels etc with threaded connections) for service.

Speaking of threaded fittings ... I'm a big fan of the brass ones. Make sure that you are buying "sweat-on" fittings for copper and not PEX.

PlumbingSupply.com









I used pre-crimped truck air-brake hoses to connect the cooling tower to the compressor and the filter for both vibration and flexibility reasons. Few things are more irritating to me than vibration being passed down the entire length of my airline.

You can do it!

Here's what I used for sweat-on drain valves.

Last edited by 66GMC; 06-17-2013 at 03:27 PM. Reason: Air Drain Valve
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 06-17-2013, 05:36 PM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: General Motors transmissions Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: near Yellowstone park
Posts: 4,039
Wiki Edits: 27

Thanks: 10
Thanked 208 Times in 195 Posts
sheet rock guard

When the flame could ignite something I like to use a scrap piece of sheetrock, and a spray bottle of water, Dampen the side towards the flame.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Garage - Tools posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home A/C a-coil for a air compressor air dryer? kevs79 Garage - Tools 14 01-07-2013 12:52 PM
Hot air from air compressor intake Mach1460 Garage - Tools 9 07-09-2012 12:43 PM
Show off your homeade/ancient air compressor/air supply system! ChevelleSS_LS6 Garage - Tools 2 08-07-2005 07:39 PM
air compressor clean air intake? montea Garage - Tools 18 09-22-2004 06:53 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.