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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2005, 09:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
I don't mean that a big tank is bad, at least as long as the pump and motor are up to the task. In the CFM range you are looking an 80 gal is about standard and will do nicely. What I meant was don't pass up a good CFM rating for a bigger tank and if you are choosing between two units of the same CFM then one with a 60 gal instead of 80 will take up slightly less room and be somewhat cheaper but the 80 will offer a slight advantage in power consumption and compressor life on a high output unit due to fewer start-up cycles but this is only a VERY slight advantage. Look at the CFM rating and let that be your guide since CFM is what runs your tools and if the CFM is not there then tank size will not matter anyway, rest assured that the companies you are looking at here have well engineered units that will be the right balance of HP/pump displacement/tank capacity and will serve you well just as they are and adding more tank capacity is unnecessary. The tank has no effect on the CFM rating and in fact we have one set-up for service trucks that puts out over 50 CFM@90 PSI and it only has a 20 gal tank because of space limitations. It is easy to find 80 gal units that have LESS CFM than some 60 gal models and that is my main point, I have seen people buy one with a bigger tank over a model with a smaller tank but MORE CFM thinking they were getting a bigger compressor because of the bigger tank when actually it is the other way around, it happens all to often and is a BIG mistake!

BTW that 7.5 HP Quincy is a really good outfit and unless you are going to run a big shop with multiple tools running at the same time it will not disappoint you. Take care of it and unless you just outgrow it you probably will still have it 30 years from now, those Quincys are that good!

Alright thanks oldred, I fully understand what your saying now. Just took me a while
As it looks right now I wont be getting the compressor for a bit. I don't move in till next friday, and I have TOO MANY boxes of tools etc to unpack and organize before i consider buying one. tables/benches and shelving first. Then compressor.

Thanks for the help once again, I really appreciate it.

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Old 06-19-2005, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Jared88
Where abouts are you in BC iwanttolearn?
I live around 10 hours away from you, excluding the ferry ride from vancouver to victoria. I have lots of family around that area, and I used to live in Surrey. So I know the place pretty well.
I live in a small city named Cranbrook.
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Old 09-05-2005, 11:48 AM
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Moved into the new house, and the garage is full of stuff right now so I won't have time for at least 6 months to sell my old one, and get a new one.

BUT I have 1 question,

The 25 cfm compressor I am looking at is 600 pounds. How do I get it into the enclosure from the truck? This is what stumps me, I can't figure a way out?? Forklift, but I dont know how to operate one, anything else?
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Old 09-05-2005, 01:26 PM
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i have bought my compressors from the same man for 30 years. find a compressor repair shop thats been around for a while. they can set you up for your application. one thing to remember. any compressor motor with 2 starters is bs. they take a 3 horse and make it a 6 horse. most have spl where hp rating would be. you find them in wally world and harbor freight and discount warehouses. i have a true 5 hp/80 that runs my shop. i got it in 84. had the pump redone 5 years ago while moving. my blasting comp is a 185 cfm.
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Old 09-06-2005, 03:06 PM
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Anyone have any ideas? No Rush, just curious...

The place where the enclosure is going to be will probably be dirt/weeds/grass. So that makes it also a lot harder to unload. I might beable to put it on a cart and roll it. But there is still the point of moving it off the cart into the enclosure.

Ah there are always difficulties
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Old 09-06-2005, 04:21 PM
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when i move mine i break it down. too heavy with pump/motor/tank. just the 5 hp motor is a handfull.
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Old 09-06-2005, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iwanttolearn
Correct me if I am wrong, but in order to get a air compressor with 23+ CFM, It will come with a large tank (ex: 80 gallons) Unless I build my own from scratch, which will probably cost more.

Thanks.
I have a 15 year old Emglo, it puts out 22cfm at 125psi
and has a 30 gallon tank. It also has 4 cylinders, and an
industrial strenght 5hp motor. It sits quietly under my work
bench, I built a cabinet around it, cut a couple of vents into
the wall for cooling, and piped in the intake air from a
modified over the road truck air filter in the eaves.
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Old 09-06-2005, 08:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shine
when i move mine i break it down. too heavy with pump/motor/tank. just the 5 hp motor is a handfull.
how easy are they to take apart though? I guess thats an option. But with 600+ pounds, you can only break it down so far. How much would a 80 gal tank weigh?
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Old 09-06-2005, 09:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iwanttolearn
how easy are they to take apart though? I guess thats an option. But with 600+ pounds, you can only break it down so far. How much would a 80 gal tank weigh?
All ways remember a Engine hoist can be used for more things than an engine. Like moving a compressor or I have used mine to move a player piano. Just a thought from someone who has to use his because he can't find someone when he needs help.
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Old 09-20-2005, 07:05 PM
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hot or cold air

These guys are all correct the tank size is just a reserve unit until your compressor catches up. Key word catches up.
Somewhere on each tool there is a cfm rateing find your highest rated tool and go a little over that and you should be safe.
Go to a body shop and find out what they are useing.
Running air from outside is just a matter of a pipe and a few fittings.
Don't dwell as you are the answeres are right in fron of you.
There are plenty of compressors for sale used, its not a bad way to go.
don't blow your mind
LOU
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Old 09-23-2005, 12:03 AM
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How many people are you going to employ in your home shop? Most hand tools are rated at 5 - 10 cfm at the most. You would have to run 3 or 4 of them at one time, constantly, to even start to work that big of compressor. A bench blaster may use slightly more air, but still not enough to even come close to work the compressors you are researching. As for compressors, from your list, I would go with the Quincy. I have seen a couple old Quincys that have been running strong for years.

As for cfm vs tank? I wonder if cfm is based solely on the pump, or if it is a combination of pump and tank? I would say that the best buy would be largest cfm to smallest tank size, because running time would be minimal. How many cfms can travel through a 3/8" line? Or 1/2" line? and at what psi?

As for me, personally, I bought a high output system early on, and it worked well. The problem was that I was moving frequently, and nowhere had the 220v hookups. Plus, even though the system was ready for some hard work, I wasn't. I sold all my big power stuff for a simple 120v roll around 30 gallon tank that puts out about 7 cfm. Besides a large sandblaster, this little thing does everything that I want. You have not listed this brand, but it is a "Speedaire" brand, and they have been in a couple of shops that I have worked in, and they last just as good as Quincy or Ingersoll Rand.

Good Luck,
Scott
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Old 09-23-2005, 06:10 AM
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they are simple to break down. 4 bolts hold the motor. 4 bolts and 1 air line on the pump. the 80 tank will take a couple of people to move by hand although i have used 8 ft 2x4's and walked mine into position. you only buy once. buy quality. i prefer buying from a service shop. a rebuild will last just as long as new. most times they will deliver and help set it. good luck.
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Old 09-23-2005, 09:05 AM
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Pimpin, No offense intended but I have to disagree with your assessment of tool air consumption. Tools such as a DA sander, grinder, cut off tool and even a small blast cabinet use a lot more CFM than that. A lot of DA sanders need about 15 or more CFM to run for any length of time and most cut off tools need even more while grinders can be air hogs too and then there is HVLP paint guns at around 14 CFM, it goes on and on. Also a true CFM rating IS based on the pump and it is a big mistake, although a commonly made one, to expect a big tank to make up for insufficient pump CFM. Recently some manufacturers are resorting to using a term called "tank assisted CFM" which may be what you are referring to but this is nothing more than a sales trick designed to create ridiculously inflated CFM numbers in order to make someone think the compressor is capable of more than it really is and is just plain nonsense. "Tank assisted CFM", "peak HP" and "maximum developed HP" are all terms meant to mislead and confuse and I would strongly recommend avoiding ANY compressor using this nonsense because if they are this dishonest then what are you getting for your money? Not all of them do this and there are some really good companies out there, THEY are the ones to buy from, not the crooked manufacturers.
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Old 10-05-2005, 09:41 AM
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compressor choice

I bought a new compressor in Jan this year and I am very pleased. I use it for air tools, sand blasting, paint, same stuff you want to do. I too live in Canada (Ontario) and I bought an 60 gallon vertical tank model with a five hp motor (220V). It flows 18.5 cfm at 125 psi. It is a Max Air available at TSC stores for about $1000. Canadian made, it will more than satisfy the needs of almost any shop. I shopped around a fair amount and found this the best value for the money anywhere. Extra tanks are not required when you have a high cfm rate. Not sure if there are TSC stores out west. Good luck with your choice.
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Old 10-05-2005, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pimpin72
How many people are you going to employ in your home shop? Most hand tools are rated at 5 - 10 cfm at the most. You would have to run 3 or 4 of them at one time, constantly, to even start to work that big of compressor. A bench blaster may use slightly more air, but still not enough to even come close to work the compressors you are researching. As for compressors, from your list, I would go with the Quincy. I have seen a couple old Quincys that have been running strong for years.

As for cfm vs tank? I wonder if cfm is based solely on the pump, or if it is a combination of pump and tank? I would say that the best buy would be largest cfm to smallest tank size, because running time would be minimal. How many cfms can travel through a 3/8" line? Or 1/2" line? and at what psi?

As for me, personally, I bought a high output system early on, and it worked well. The problem was that I was moving frequently, and nowhere had the 220v hookups. Plus, even though the system was ready for some hard work, I wasn't. I sold all my big power stuff for a simple 120v roll around 30 gallon tank that puts out about 7 cfm. Besides a large sandblaster, this little thing does everything that I want. You have not listed this brand, but it is a "Speedaire" brand, and they have been in a couple of shops that I have worked in, and they last just as good as Quincy or Ingersoll Rand.

Good Luck,
Scott
On cheapo garbage compressors, there is a tank assisted CFM rating, which is how much the tank can flow basicly, making it a garbage number. A good compressor will have a SCFM rating which is how much volume the pump itself flows.


as for compressor options, what about getting a 4 or v6 motor and putting check valves in the spark plug holes, and run them to a manifold, then get a motor powerful enough to crank it over, using the crank pully.
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