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Old 06-05-2005, 07:51 PM
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Air compressor-opinions on CFM/brand

Alright...main purpose of compressor would be to power sanders, impact, grinder, paint gun, primer gun, sand blasting, plasma cutting, everything I can possibly use it for in reason.

Searched and a lot of people said bigger the better. The next size I see is 120 gallon, and those are all horizontal. Which take up way too much room. 220V wiring is what I need for a good compressor. Didn't get much when I searched. A lot of people asked about 60gallons and smaller.

I am looking for a stationary, vertical, 80 gallon+ air compressor to go into my new shop. Although the 80+ gallon tank will take up alot of room, it will be worth it. The shop is 20x20' by the way...I don't really want to, and I don';t know if I could. But worst case scenario I will build a shed for it outside. Although I don't know how I could get the air into my shop. I also might consider adding a second air tank. Above the compressor on a metal shelf. Probably aim for as many gallons I can fit above, without taking up too much room. The more reserve air I have, the less the compressor works. Although the compressor will work a lot whenever both go empty.
I had an earlier post that asked about my compressor which is actually 35 gallons, and a lousy 5.7 CFM maximum. This is IR by the way...So I will probably sell it before I buy the bigger one.
I have my eyes on Eaton, Champion, and Quincy. From what I have heard, those are the best quality ones. I have read here, and on other forums that Quincy is very good, and Eaton is along the same high quality line. haven't heard much about Champion, besides TPTools website. They seem to like them though!!

These are the compressors I am thinking of choosing from:
http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=23879
http://www.tptools.com/product.asp?b...9VWV1LJ7A32DK7
http://www.eatoncompressor.com/page/page/504747.htm
http://www.tptools.com/product.asp?b...9VWV1LJ7A32DK7
http://www.tptools.com/product.asp?b...9VWV1LJ7A32DK7

Although I don't know if those are the cheapest prices, I didn't look for prices yet, just size, etc. I read a lot here you can never have too big of a compressor. This size is around where I want.

Any experience, opinions, or suggestions? I won't be getting one for a while...maybe not till next summer.But I am planning out the layout for the shop. It's tight as it is, so I need to be really organized!
I want HIGH CFM because of the sandblaster, paint guns, and sanders.
I don't know which one yet, any suggestions? Shipping will be expensive, I am in BC Canada. But it will be worth it in my opinion.

So yes, comments, suggestions are all welcome. Anything I should know?
Thanks.

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Last edited by Iwanttolearn; 06-10-2005 at 07:53 PM.
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Old 06-05-2005, 10:34 PM
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I would suggest you do a search on compressors, this has been discussed in depth almost to the point of overdoing it. There is no such thing as an 80 gal or 120 gal or any GALLON compressor, a big tank WILL NOT help in the least in keeping up with your tools. Look at the CFM rating as that is what counts and although a lot of people simply won't believe it a big tank does not make a big compressor. It sounds as if you are about to spend a lot of money so I would suggest you educate yourself on compressed air before you do and spend wisely. Remember a good compressor will be a balanced set-up of HP to compressor displacement to storage tank size. Bigger is not always better and you are putting far to much emphasis on tank size and almost overlooking what really matters.
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Old 06-06-2005, 08:23 PM
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A point to remember on compressors. The only thing that counts is CFM, CFM, CFM. High Output screw and vane compressors don't have storage tanks at all or small ones to even out the pluse in piston compressors. I know these are beyond shop comps, but the point is buy a compressor that will produce more air than you use under all conditions for a satisfactory air system.
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Old 06-06-2005, 09:04 PM
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Iwanttolearn:

You better pay attention to these guys. Go read Fat_46's "YAFCQ - yet another freaking compressor question" in the Garage forum. I found out after I had poured too much money in parts of an oversized system to be able to back out. Now I'm going to have about $1400 -$1500 in a system when I could have had plenty for my needs at half that. You appear to be heading in the other direction: buying an undersized compressor with an oversized tank. Get the facts BEFORE you get on the wrong track.
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Old 06-10-2005, 07:40 PM
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Why am I buying an undersized compressor? If you looked at all the links they put out on average around 22 CFM. THAT is why I was considering them. Not because of the tank size.

I will search for that thread in the garage in a second.
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Old 06-10-2005, 07:51 PM
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Read that thread. From what I got out of it, I have to look at the amps?
The 4 compressors I posted have a range of 31-35 amps. And all of them are 2 stage.
Whats so wrong with the compressors I posted? Is it just because of the tank size?
And how am I overlooking what matters? All of them have high CFM ratings, they are 2 stage, and they use a lot of amps.
What am I missing guys?

(Note: sorry if I sound mad, I am just confused with everyones answers)
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Old 06-10-2005, 08:45 PM
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What matters is CFM at a particular PSI. The tank size is not that big a deal. Yes it is desirable to have a decent tank size, but that means nothing if your compressor can't maintain a decent CFM at a given PSI.

Vince
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Old 06-10-2005, 09:45 PM
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In your original thread you talked about tank size, tank size and tank size and a lot about gallons also and little else. You said the next size you were looking at was 120 GAL as if that meant a big compressor. You said you were lacking in room but you were going to sacrifice some of it to make room for the big tank and even add a second tank if you could find room. You also said you were aiming for the most gallons you could get. Why? That is why I said you were almost overlooking what really matters. A 60 gallon vertical tank is just fine for a small shop and is all you need and would not take up as much room as a big 120 horizontal unit and the second tank is unnecessary. The compressors you mention are good sized units and will provide enough air for most shops regardless of which tank you get. You said that although the 80 gal tank will take up a lot of room it will be worth it, but will it? The only difference you will see between a 60 gal and an 80 gal is that the compressor will not cycle on and off as often but it will run longer when it it does kick on but it will not make the compressor deliver more air. When using a high volume tool like a DA sander these cycle time differences can usually be measured in seconds and it would be a mistake to sacrifice needed room for an over-sized tank thinking it will increase compressor performance when it will not. Clearly you were looking at the tank as the most important factor when in reality it is the least important part of the system and in fact the compressor would deliver the same amount of air with a 40 gal tank as it would with a 120 gal. A tank that small would cause other problems and I am only using that to make the point that going to the extreme either way is not good.
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Old 06-11-2005, 12:35 AM
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oldred, you proved me to be stupid.
Anywhere I can read so I know what I am looking for? Thanks
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Old 06-11-2005, 08:41 AM
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[QUOTE=Iwanttolearn]Why am I buying an undersized compressor? QUOTE]
Go back and reread my 1st post. The only thing that counts is the output of the compressor. Determine how much air you are going to use and buy a compressor that will produce more.
A 60 gal tank is all you need for a reserve if the compressor is sized right.
A 7" air sander will require 11-12 cfm
22cfm will run a bead blaster or a very small sand blaster satisfactorily with occasional rests to let the compressor cool.
My 105 cfm Jeager just bearly keeps up with my 90lb pressurized sandblaster
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Old 06-11-2005, 09:39 AM
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You are in no way, shape or form stupid and I did not mean to make it sound like that is what I meant and in fact normally I would have been skeptical about a 16 year old building a shop and buying a big compressor but I have no doubt that you are going to do just that and I find that to be very impressive. I started out very young also and I have spent my entire working life as a welding shop operator serving the mining and logging industry since the early 70's and part of my business has been installing air compressors and building air systems for service trucks, mining machinery and shops. This thing about tank size is the most mis-understood thing about compressors and why would'nt it be? Just about every ad you see for a new compressor lists tank size and HP numbers as the most important features for a companies unit because these outfits know that "BIG" sells. Big HP numbers make a compressor seem powerful because people can relate to horsepower and they can see a big tank that LOOKS powerful but CFM numbers are something most people just don't think much about, when all else is said and done most of the cheap units that LOOK and SOUND big will barely make enough air to blow your hat off much less run big air tools. Now after having said all that, the compressors you are looking at are all good choices and should serve your needs. The Eaton is a really good outfit but my all time favorite is Quincy as these things seem to be nearly indestructible. A co-worker of mine has an old gas Quincy that has worn out two engines and a tank over the last thirty years but that pump is still going strong!

Quincy
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Old 06-12-2005, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
You are in no way, shape or form stupid and I did not mean to make it sound like that is what I meant and in fact normally I would have been skeptical about a 16 year old building a shop and buying a big compressor but I have no doubt that you are going to do just that and I find that to be very impressive. I started out very young also and I have spent my entire working life as a welding shop operator serving the mining and logging industry since the early 70's and part of my business has been installing air compressors and building air systems for service trucks, mining machinery and shops. This thing about tank size is the most mis-understood thing about compressors and why would'nt it be? Just about every ad you see for a new compressor lists tank size and HP numbers as the most important features for a companies unit because these outfits know that "BIG" sells. Big HP numbers make a compressor seem powerful because people can relate to horsepower and they can see a big tank that LOOKS powerful but CFM numbers are something most people just don't think much about, when all else is said and done most of the cheap units that LOOK and SOUND big will barely make enough air to blow your hat off much less run big air tools. Now after having said all that, the compressors you are looking at are all good choices and should serve your needs. The Eaton is a really good outfit but my all time favorite is Quincy as these things seem to be nearly indestructible. A co-worker of mine has an old gas Quincy that has worn out two engines and a tank over the last thirty years but that pump is still going strong!

Quincy
Sorry, I didn't mean to say that I thought you thought I was stupid (make sense?) I just figured my post was stupid, personally.

I have been helping my dad work on trucks and cars for as long as I remeber. And since he past away over a year ago now, I have to step up and make big decisions on my own. Luckily there are places like this to assist me, and point me away from bad, and guide me to good.

The only thing I don't understand is the bigger the tank, the larger the CFM rating is.
For example, to get 25 CFM, I would have to look at a bigger tank too, (looking at www.tptools.com website)
Here is the 25 CFM one, the largest:
http://www.tptools.com/product.asp?b...9VWV1LJ7A32DK7

Verses this one with 17 CFM and a smaller tank:
http://www.tptools.com/product.asp?b...9VWV1LJ7A32DK7

Correct me if I am wrong, but in order to get a air compressor with 23+ CFM, It will come with a large tank (ex: 80 gallons) Unless I build my own from scratch, which will probably cost more.

And one of the uses for the compressor, like I mentioned (I think) is to use a sandblaster. I will build my own bench one for small parts. But I also will have some sort of pressurized pot sandblaster. So I need the CFM to be high.

Thanks.
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Old 06-12-2005, 07:53 PM
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I don't mean that a big tank is bad, at least as long as the pump and motor are up to the task. In the CFM range you are looking an 80 gal is about standard and will do nicely. What I meant was don't pass up a good CFM rating for a bigger tank and if you are choosing between two units of the same CFM then one with a 60 gal instead of 80 will take up slightly less room and be somewhat cheaper but the 80 will offer a slight advantage in power consumption and compressor life on a high output unit due to fewer start-up cycles but this is only a VERY slight advantage. Look at the CFM rating and let that be your guide since CFM is what runs your tools and if the CFM is not there then tank size will not matter anyway, rest assured that the companies you are looking at here have well engineered units that will be the right balance of HP/pump displacement/tank capacity and will serve you well just as they are and adding more tank capacity is unnecessary. The tank has no effect on the CFM rating and in fact we have one set-up for service trucks that puts out over 50 CFM@90 PSI and it only has a 20 gal tank because of space limitations. It is easy to find 80 gal units that have LESS CFM than some 60 gal models and that is my main point, I have seen people buy one with a bigger tank over a model with a smaller tank but MORE CFM thinking they were getting a bigger compressor because of the bigger tank when actually it is the other way around, it happens all to often and is a BIG mistake!

BTW that 7.5 HP Quincy is a really good outfit and unless you are going to run a big shop with multiple tools running at the same time it will not disappoint you. Take care of it and unless you just outgrow it you probably will still have it 30 years from now, those Quincys are that good!
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Old 06-12-2005, 08:50 PM
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Where abouts are you in BC iwanttolearn?
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Old 06-13-2005, 03:14 PM
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got my eaton 5 hp 80 gallon hort. compressor about 1 month ago ,i have cut,sanded,impacted and sandblasted everyting i could get my hands on and have not wanted for air one time. best compressor i have ever used . best price i could find in this area. i am only 25 miles the factory so i saved on shipping ,but also got to meet matt the owner and he is second to none in the customer service department
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