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Old 06-25-2007, 01:03 PM
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aluminum fuel line

I was wondering if you have to double flare aluminum fuel line? I am going to make a carb inlet for my Mighty Demon and want to use hardline like in the new Hot Rod magazine article, but make it out of aluminum instead of stainless. Would aluminum work or should I use stainless? Thanks.

Don

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Old 06-25-2007, 01:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schatzy
I was wondering if you have to double flare aluminum fuel line? I am going to make a carb inlet for my Mighty Demon and want to use hardline like in the new Hot Rod magazine article, but make it out of aluminum instead of stainless. Would aluminum work or should I use stainless? Thanks.

Don
Use a steel line on the engine, stainless or not. Aluminum, like copper is sensitive to work hardening which leads to brittle fractures which leads to gasoline, under pressure, being sprayed all over the hot engine. Rubber has the same danger of rupture under pressure, putting a spray of fuel over the engine.

Bogie
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Old 06-25-2007, 01:34 PM
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Agreed! Aluminum also does not stand up well to constant vibration, unless fastened down very well. Polished steel or stainless would look nice and by much safer.
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Old 06-25-2007, 03:40 PM
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I hate to threadjack here, but I have a aluminum line running from my frame mounted fuel filter to a 6" long piece of hose which attaches to the fuel regulator next to the carb.

Is this also a bad idea? The line doens't seem stressed at all, but???
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Old 06-25-2007, 04:04 PM
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It's vibration that gets it as much as anything. All metals react to vibration in a process called "work hardening". We non-metallurgists call this crystallizing when we see the eventual break of the material.

Steels are more resistant to vibration induced work hardening but certainly aren't immune. Copper and its alloys and soft aluminum are given to work hardening, especially copper and its relatives. Aluminum usually takes longer than copper to get to the fracture point, but it will. The solution would be to make the fuel line from a T0 temper alloy and then heat treat it, yeah like how many of us even know to do that let alone know who to call to have it done. So steel tube is just a simpler and safer solution.

That being said, I'm somewhat less concerned where aluminum is used off the engine, away from exhaust and under suction rather than pressure as the possibility of failure is reduced and so are the consequences of a failure under those conditions. However, like wire and cable, the stuff is soft and subject to abrasion as well so mounting it away from contact with hard parts is important.

Lastly is inspection, inspection, inspection; if you use this stuff, then keep and eye on it.

Bogie
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Old 06-25-2007, 04:05 PM
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You need the rubber line from your tank line to the pump for vibration. Never use rubber on the pressure side of the pump, it is an invitation to disaster IMO. Ford cars in the seventies and eighties had a fire reputation because of the 3" piece of rubber hose on the pressure side of the pump.

Vince
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Old 06-25-2007, 05:11 PM
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I think it would be okay to use alluminum for the carb inlet. I did that with my dual quad set up years ago and had no problems. I only did a single flare on them though because that was the only tool I had at the time.
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:47 PM
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If I remember correctly, double flare is for brake lines, single for steel fuel and P/S lines.
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Old 06-25-2007, 07:08 PM
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Double flare for hard metal lines, a single is ok for soft such as aluminum or copper.
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Old 06-25-2007, 07:20 PM
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Ahhhh!!! ok, guess I need more Ginko Beloba in my diet.
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