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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 05-29-2006, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xntrik
If I understand you correctly, you feel that

"going into or against the wind has a significant effect"

but that a 40 mph tailwind at 55 mph will NOT increase the fuel mileage almost 40% compared to a no-wind condition.

OK.......
WE do not have an issue here. One of the reasons tests are conducted in the real world, is to solidify theory. One can speculate all they want but many theories do not pan out. In a class 8 over the road truck it is nearly impossible to average over 50MPH due to speed limits.....forget the log books for this discussion...

ANY deviation MAY influence MPG.

A TRAINED driver might get more MPG than an UNTRAINED driver with the same truck.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 05-30-2006, 04:09 AM
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In an Atkinson with a 435 hoss 8V92TTA, rt1215 and 3.9 sp40's I used to get 5.2 mpg (imperial) on the flat with 3 decks of shorn wethers (neutered rams) packed tight and no headwind, empty I could never get 5 mpg - wind resistance through the stock crate.
Tarp that load and build speed slowly for hills - if the law allows.
BTW, Ford Australia and the gas and fuel corp used to run inline Cummins with a coil pack and cng, I left Melbourne years ago so don't know if they still do. A friend who works on earthmovers runs his diesel hunting rig on 50/50 diesel/hydraulic oil, hard cold start and less go.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 05-30-2006, 06:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tominator
Super Singles are about 700lbs lighter than the equivalent duals. I see LOTS of trucks with them, mostly tankers and flatbeds and they are indeed rated to the same load ratings as dual wheel/tire combos. An extra 700lbs of payload will pay for them in their life easily. Tankers and flat beds benefit the most so they are switching first.

As they become more popular they get cheaper and cheaper and many truck stops have them for replacement on hand.

The two largest truck load carriers and all the LTL carriers recycle their oil and I know of no Class 8 truck motor where the manufacturer recommends burning used motor oil.

I spent quite a bit of my OOR career testing various configurations of fairings in the 'real world' on trailers and cabs and it is a well known fact that until 53MPH aerodynamics do not influence MPG in any great way, that is, measurable. Sure going into or against the wind will have a significant effect, but my statement still remains.
In B.C.,Alberta,Washington,Oregon,and Idaho,the weight allowances for super singles is so much lower than duals that you would lose money hauling with them on,not to mention the cost of the tires themselves and the fact that you must pull over and have it repaired or changed on the spot,unlike duals where you can run a flat or just pull the tire off the rim.

The new cat engines in class 8 trucks equipped with the extended oil drain interval option,utilizes a 10 gal oil resevoir,old motor oil is taken out of the crankcase at intervals determined by the computer,fresh oil is injected back into it,the old oil is injected into the fuel system and burned.
It is an approved system all accross North America.
Do a google and check it out.

H&R transport,Canadian Freightways,and many others still add their used oil to their fuel,the energy in a litre of oil is almost twice that of a litre of deisel,and at eighty cents a litre for deisel,it makes way more sense to use it as fuel than to sell it to a recycler for twenty cents a litre,you would be losing money.
And truckers hate losing money.
And when you think of it,using it as fuel is recycling it,right?

Last edited by jim..; 05-30-2006 at 06:52 AM.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 05-31-2006, 01:54 AM
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80 cents a litre? it's $1.50 here or near six bux per US gallon! Good thing my rides all run on 95 ron unleaded - $1.45 or propane at 59 cents ( 47 in Melbourne).
Work is 42km(26 miles) away so my 5l efi Holden Statesman costs me $60 a week, NO 4cyl or diesel is worth saving $20 a week.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 05-31-2006, 02:40 PM
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A definite lack of helpful suggestions so far.
Look here for some fairly interesting info in an SAE paper.
Here to read up on some stuff the Department of Energy was fooling with.
And there are these things.
These here.
And these thingies here particularly caught my eye. And they're relatively cheap too.
I know if I were running a fleet of trucks I'd be very interested in this stuff. It'd be fairly to set up different trucks with different stuff and put them to work. With a wide enough variety of otherwise identical trucks doing very similar work it'd not be too different to add up all their long term fuel expenses and determine if this or that modification saved an appreciable amount of fuel. I'd be suprised if several companies weren't already doing this.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 05-31-2006, 08:53 PM
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My current truck is a 2001 Pete with a 475 cat and 10 speed. I average about 6.5 to to 7 mpg depending on weight. The truck is set up to run 62 miles an hour at 1350 rpm. Here are some things that I think matter:

Keep the weight down. I have a sit in sleeper not a walk in condo I also run weed burner exhaust (even though I'd rather have stacks)

Keep the truck shortened up as much as possible.

Don't think that cutting the engine power back will save fuel. Every gear you loose on a grade will cost.

If the outside temperature isn't extreme, (really hot or cold,) don't idle. Besides, idling will let the cylinder walls wash down and that wears out engines.

Most of all. USE THE CRUISE CONTROL!!!!!
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 05-31-2006, 11:04 PM
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my friend's rig is a 2001 volvo with cummins n14 turbo. the rest i don't know.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2006, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsyR
A definite lack of helpful suggestions so far.

.
Tire pressure.
Proper load tarping.
Recycling oil.
Proper gearing.
Maintain steady speeds.
Lighter loads.
Proper grade fuel.
Aerodynamics.
Tire choice.
Tractor/trailer spacing.
Keeping empty miles to a minimum.
Proper maintainence.


Have you read the whole thread gyppy?
I've seen lots of good info so far.
We'll try to do better next time,we just want your approval.

Last edited by jim..; 06-01-2006 at 09:50 AM.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 06-17-2006, 11:54 PM
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Ok, I'm a retired over-the-road trucker. Drove all 48, Canada, Mexico and Alaska for 33 years. Here's the bottom line...You will NEVER get a handle on this fuel problem. Companies have spent millions trying to figure out how to get an extra MPG. There are too many variables out there to contend with. The average is between 7 and 8 MPG. Some will tell you they get 9 MPG. Sure, they get 9 MPG...Sometimes! Other times they get 6 or 7. 10 MPG with an 8000 LB load in a 53' trailer, I think you fueled and forgot to mark it. I bobtailed from California to Tx in a new Pete on I-10 and got only 9 MPG. Through the years I discovered how to increase my MPG's. 1) Stay out of the mountains, The Widow Maker, Grapevine, Cabbage, Wolf Creek Pass, and all the rest will eat up your fuel. Especially when some Goober cuts in front of you and you have to take your foot off the fuel pedal. Now you've lost your momentum, and you're dropping gears. Try to get runs below the Mason/Dixon line on flatter roads 2) Keep your speed steady. Stay on the interstate as much as possible. That little cut off through that little town may save you 15 minutes in time, but will eat up fuel as you run through the gears at every red light. 3) Buy fuel at one dealer. I prefer to buy at Petro. Flying J is over priced, and Pilot is crap. Consider that huge Mobile tank off in the distance. The top 70% goes to dealers selling Mobile fuel. The next 20% at the bottom is sold to places like Pilot at a reduced rate. (It's full of silt). The remaining 10% should never be sold, but it is, to local Mom and Pop fuel stations for next to nothing. (It's full of water and debris). 4) Weight is the key factor. The lighter the load, the higher the MPG's. That's why I dropped the box and went to a flatbed hauling oversize loads (Not Overweight). Most of my loads were always below 28,000 LBS. Occasionally, I had to take a cheap 35,000 LB load just to get out to a better paying load. 5) And finally, Quit listening to that damn dispatcher! More miles does NOT mean more money! Smart miles does. More money per mile and low overhead is how you make a profit. If you only get 6 MPG, deal with it. Work it into your budget. when you have a good profit, use it to buy a truck with better MPG's, then work within that budget. By-the-way...Chrome and lights won't help your MPG's or make you go faster.

Just for the record. I ran a 1988 long nose Peterbuilt with a 3406 Cat engine. The wheelbase was 220 inches with a 100 inch California sleeper. My average was 7.5 MPG. My average speed was 68 MPH. I don't know my top speed, I chickened out at 100.

Last edited by lakota; 06-18-2006 at 12:18 AM.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2006, 07:02 PM
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Being a driver myself...

I have some opinions on the subject as well....
I agree with the limiting your speed 100% !!!!!! I drive a Freightliner FLD120 with a Detroit 60/475 HP and a straight ten. Virtually all fleet trucks are geared to run around 60 mph at max efficiency. Drop 1-1.5 mpg if you do 75. Not worth it.

Mountains suck. 3 miles @ 6% grade with a 30,000 lb load = big fuel $$$. No exceptions. I run a drop deck moving van, and an aero-type truck, so that aero stuff is already taken care of. Running through mountains out west, I drop from 6.5-7 mpg to 4.5-5 mpg. If you are running a classic truck, and want to save fuel, you are going to be stuck going 55.

Keep up on maintence, ie tire pressure, brakes, etc. Very commonsense, but SO OFTEN neglected.

Use cruise ALOT, and progressive shift. If you don't know what this is, look it up. I have also noticed removing the governor entirely seems to give better fuel economy, assuming there is driver restraint.

Don't idle if possible. My truck has "Optimized Idle" and a cab thermostat, so it only idles the engine as necessary for climate control. At idle it uses around 1 gal/hr, but when on "OI" it only idles on average on 1/4-1/3 the time. I stay warm or cool depending on the season, and saves fuel/wear-tear as well.

It is really not hard, but I meet so many on the road who ignore this commonsense wisdom as it means nothing. Tell your compadre not to be one of them. Many companies also give fuel economy bonuses, for good reason. Practices which save fuel are often better for the truck.

Cheers,
Andy
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 06-21-2006, 07:53 AM
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interesting thread if it makes you fell better 4.5 to 5 is what I get out of my truck and in my gig that is about as good as it gets but to the guy who said were to get your fuel it for the most part doesn't matter as the only difference is in what part of the tank someone gets is determined buy who's truck shows up at the rack first
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Old 07-22-2006, 11:18 AM
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Preheat your fuel!
If you haven't already, you should rig up some type of system where you utilize some heat from the coolent to warm up the fuel before it is burned in the cylinders. This will promote finer fuel droplets, better atomization, thus better combustion.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2006, 02:43 PM
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odd I read 7 & 8 & 9 even 10mph, odd cause I own/operate a 99 international eagle pro sleeper 335hp cat single axle 10speed and pull a 48' 4 car wally mo trailer. quarterly fuel taxes show 8.8 gpm average. I'm licensed for 46,000 gross and never been over 36,000 gross I owned a 99 frightliner fld120 350hp Cummings single axle 10speed and pulled a 3/4 car take3 53' stepdeck trailer that was licensed for 46,000 also, it got on a average 7.8mph.

I've owned a couple big dogs too, a 99 Pete 379 long nose with a 550hp cat(it was Hot & turned up to the max ) 18 speed big bunk 8" dual straight stacks and all the goodies ect. twin screw pulling a 53' spread axle refer, and a 95 pete 379 long nose 450hp cat 8" dual straight stacks and all the goodies ect. (it was turned up to over 500hp ) 15 speed big bunk pulling a 53' spread axle refer. butt then I was running mid west to the west coast. average was 5.7 to 6 tops ( butt I dont really remember)

I also pulled a triple axle bull rack with the 95 pete 450hp cat (it was turned up to over 500hp ) 15 speed big bunk twin screw , a good mph was 5.5 to 5mph or so, butt then I was licensed for 94,000 and could bridge & axle 90,000 butt then I was running mid west to the west coast.

fuel was cheaper when I owned the petes

Mustangsaly
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2006, 02:56 PM
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ooh yeah with the car transport I average $1.65 a mi, but get a lot of loads at $195 to $2.50 a mi. No Bull ***** ! my wife does my dispatching



butt it's door to door, so residential in Washington DC or Detroit ect. is a ***** sometimes,





Mustangsaly
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Old 07-23-2006, 03:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakota

Just for the record. I ran a 1988 long nose Peterbuilt with a 3406 Cat engine. The wheelbase was 220 inches with a 100 inch California sleeper. My average was 7.5 MPG. My average speed was 68 MPH. I don't know my top speed, I chickened out at 100.

I run the speed limit and in my early yrs I toped one out at a buck twenty, never again !!!!!!!

[QUOTE=lakota]

By-the-way...Chrome and lights won't help your MPG's or make you go faster.

so true, but I loved em in the 1st few OTR yrs

Mustangsaly
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