Anyone use heat to thin lacquer or urethanes? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
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Old 09-24-2011, 09:57 PM
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Anyone use heat to thin lacquer or urethanes?

I've heard that heating lacquer to a high temp can help thin the material instead of using lacquer reducers. Anyone ever done this?

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Old 09-25-2011, 01:25 AM
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I use those coffee cup warmers or candle warmers to bring temps up on all materials

http://youtu.be/tisgnyHkzSk
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Old 09-25-2011, 01:35 AM
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it doeswork just use one of those electric hot plate thigns. i'd be carefull though they tend to be flammable
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Old 09-26-2011, 07:44 AM
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In line heaters have been and are used on production lines to eliminate the need for additional solvents. If you can control the heat, I would never heat them more the 120 to 140 F.
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Old 02-11-2012, 10:42 AM
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I ended up using a heat trace cable (recommended by a specialty shop that sells rigs like what I'm describing) and wrapped it in foil and in pipe insulation around my pressure pot's fluid hose.

It actually did the thinning I was after. My temps were around 140F and very steady. Worked very good to thin the material, it atomized beautifully. However I was still having to spray too much material to get it to flow out and solvent pop was the result (lots of tiny trapped air bubbles).

So back to thinning my lacquer 50/50.

The kicker for me was when the heat trace arced. Not a pleasant sound next to a pot full of lacquer and sprayed mist in the air. That's the end of heating for me (at least with my current setup). I really wouldn't have expected the specially designed heat trace cable to malfunction in use. But I guess if it can go wrong it will.
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Old 02-12-2012, 04:53 AM
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heat trace cable is intended to be used with a thermostat that shuts of at a relatively low temp. it is to stop freezing, never intended for being used as a hot pad which would have been a much more intelligent choice.
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Old 02-12-2012, 06:31 AM
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I had a can of chassis black on a paint roller. It was a little too cool to paint. I put a space heater on it for short bit to bring it up to temp.

I ran a quick errand into town and forgot about it. I got home to a black wall of paint.
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Old 02-12-2012, 04:03 PM
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Always used a Hot Plate

We always heated the old transport Enamel it went on nicer and the early enamel with hardners.good old days
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