Bad bondo job??? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 12:38 PM
oldguy829's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Swapping to rack and pinion steering
Last journal entry: 53 coupe
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: San Antonio Tx
Age: 71
Posts: 565
Wiki Edits: 88

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Bad bondo job???

OK. I've read many posts, I follow directions, and it still looks like s....
My bondo just won't smooth out. I end up with little valleys or humps. I sand off the humps, fill in the valleys, and end up with new humps and valleys.
I used 7 pounds of Bondo, must have 6 pounds of dust on the floor. Can anyone guess what I'm doing wrong?
Anyone make housecalls?

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 12:50 PM
jcclark's Avatar
The Penny Pincher
 

Last journal entry: Hanging Bumpers
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, Ky. U.S.A.
Age: 61
Posts: 1,880
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 4
Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
What kind of sanding block you using?
You need a long straight hard one. (sanding block that is)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 03:15 PM
roger1's Avatar
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: San Angelo,TX
Age: 59
Posts: 1,099
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 12
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldguy829
OK. I've read many posts, I follow directions, and it still looks like s....
My bondo just won't smooth out. I end up with little valleys or humps. I sand off the humps, fill in the valleys, and end up with new humps and valleys.
I used 7 pounds of Bondo, must have 6 pounds of dust on the floor. Can anyone guess what I'm doing wrong?
Anyone make housecalls?
Sand it with a hard backed board by hand like Jim says. Buy your board and the paper for it at your body shop supply store. (Pep Boy's doesn't carry the stuff you need.)
Start out with 60 grit. Fill any remaining low spots and sand with 120 on your same board. Finish off with 320 and then spray on your surfacer. Then fill any pin holes with spot putty (not the air dry junk) before your second coat of surfacer.
Sould be a fairly quick process if you doing it right.

You will want to use a long hard backed board for sanding your primer/surfacer also. I like to start out with 180 dry and finish with 400 before any follow up coats.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 03:53 PM
milo's Avatar
point on positive
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: milogarage Calif.
Age: 58
Posts: 1,677
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 3
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Have you ever seen these pictures before? ... ...
If not click this for a sec http://www.a2zautoforums.com/showthread.php?t=936
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	step1.jpg
Views:	333
Size:	64.2 KB
ID:	9543   Click image for larger version

Name:	step2.jpg
Views:	267
Size:	181.8 KB
ID:	9544   Click image for larger version

Name:	step3.jpg
Views:	229
Size:	129.8 KB
ID:	9545   Click image for larger version

Name:	step4.jpg
Views:	247
Size:	151.5 KB
ID:	9546   Click image for larger version

Name:	step5.jpg
Views:	273
Size:	176.5 KB
ID:	9547  

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 04:17 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Green Bay, WI
Age: 44
Posts: 2,073
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
what grit are you starting out with? If its a pretty large area with a bit of fill to be done, I find it easiest to get straight by starting out with 36 grit on as long of a block as possible in the area you are working, unless of course the block is a lot bigger then the area you have to do. Once its straight then worry about taking care of scratches by going over with a finer grit, or applying a skim coat of filler over the whole area and block sand that with a finer grit. Sand from one end of the filler to the other end in an x patterns if possible until it feathers out. You need to have the feel to determine what areas are high and need more blocking and what areas are low that need more bodyfiller. Applying some 3m dry guide coat or misting some rattle can black over the filler before sanding may help someone without much experience some and help identify low areas, but you still need to have a feel when its sanded the right amount and which areas to concentrate on that need more work. Get the filler sanded down to 80 or 180 grit scratch and straight before your first round of primer, Then block sand that primer with 180 grit, and if it feels good at that point, spray a few more coats of primer and sand that with the final grit recommended for the paint you are using. If not, more rounds of block sanding and priming, or even possibly finishing putty. If its still not straight, then you need to get the body filler straighter before thinking of priming.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 04:22 PM
lowROLLERchevy's Avatar
... & Insanity Ensues .....
 
Last wiki edit: The FREE T Bucket plans Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Western NY
Age: 35
Posts: 937
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldguy829
Can anyone guess what I'm doing wrong?
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldguy829
I sand off the humps, fill in the valleys, and end up with new humps and valleys
Thats your answer

anytime you add a new coat of filler in just one spot, it will become a highspot

anytime your adding filler, recoat a larger area, dont just try to fill the lows
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 05:28 PM
oldguy829's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Swapping to rack and pinion steering
Last journal entry: 53 coupe
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: San Antonio Tx
Age: 71
Posts: 565
Wiki Edits: 88

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Bad Bond

Thanks to everyone. Milo, that tutorial is excellent. I may have found a clue. 1. Waited too long to sand, so its rock hard and lots of work
2. started with 100 grit instead of 36
3 used 4 " sanding blocks instead of long blocks
4 tried to "spot" in the lows instead of covering the entire thing again

Other than that, why am I haveing trouble....LOL>
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 06:14 PM
jim..'s Avatar
That 6 Cylinder Guy
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: yes
Posts: 273
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldguy829
OK. I used 7 pounds of Bondo, must have 6 pounds of dust on the floor. Can anyone guess what I'm doing wrong?
Anyone make housecalls?
Man,I laughed so hard at that !!!!
That's exactly what I did when chopping my truck,finally gave up and took it to a body shop to have the finishing work done,since then I've bought all kinds of body work tools,sanders,feather edgers,sanding blocks of all size and shapes,but that finishing work still eludes me.
I have a greater respect for the body guys that can do suh a nice job,they make it look so easy.
I hope you figure it out,if not, let the pro's do it,otherwise you will never be happy with it.
I'm putting a new hood scoop on my truck next week,but I'm having it done by a pro,I just don't have the nack for it.

7 pounds of bondo and six pounds of dust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2006, 06:57 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Green Bay, WI
Age: 44
Posts: 2,073
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Yeah, I too like to catch the filler when it is still a little soft, makes shaping it so much easier. If you just have a few low spot in the filler, catching it while it is still soft makes things easier too, that way the filler you just put on sands easier then the already existing filler, and you don't end up cutting down as much on the filler you already had on that getting it smooth and level. There is times when I like to let my filler set up, if its too soft it can tear and not feather as nice, but initial shaping I like to do while its still soft, unless its only a small dent or something, then can let it set up and start with 80. Once all low spots are filled and it all feels straight, I often will put one thin coat over the whole thing and sand with 80 grit and then take some of the 80 grit scratches out by going over with 180. A finishing type filler works well for a thin coat over the whole thing if you don't really have any big imperfections or low spots. The finishing puttys spread smoothly and seem to sand easier. The skim coat of finishing putty I will let set up a bit.
Get enough practice working with bodyfiller or any bodywork and paint for that matter, and you pick up your own favorite tricks that work well for you, to get good results faster. I am sure a lot of people have experienced troubles and a lot of bodyfiller, sandpaper, and muscle
wasted starting out. Its kinda funny to watch someone who doesn't have any real experience working with filler in a bodyshop sometimes, but eventually get taught the tricks from others in the shop, hopefully at least. I've seen guys before work on a small dent, fill it, sand to much off, fill again, and over and over.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2006, 08:48 AM
oldguy829's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Swapping to rack and pinion steering
Last journal entry: 53 coupe
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: San Antonio Tx
Age: 71
Posts: 565
Wiki Edits: 88

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
bad bondo

It is kind of funny, as in pathetic. But I'm going to try again. Just have one concern. What I am filling is where the top was welded in, so the idea of always doing "the entire repair" is not possible. I can't mix a batch big enough to go all the way around the top in one pass.
Any tips for handling this situation?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2006, 09:29 AM
milo's Avatar
point on positive
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: milogarage Calif.
Age: 58
Posts: 1,677
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 3
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Good for ya! Now that your thinking has changed and you have a better understanding of why filler sands at different rates your in a better position to control what is going on. Maybe work it into halves or thirds etc.. Use the end of a curve or crown line...

Heres a monster of a car yet it was done in sections.

http://www.a2zautoforums.com/showthr...6&page=1&pp=10

The fillers can also be thined with the resin or "honey" and making them cure a little slower as well as handle larger areas.
Hang in there!

Last edited by milo; 01-27-2006 at 09:41 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2006, 10:35 AM
jvsapp's Avatar
just a gearhead in paradise..
 

Last journal entry: last ones for now.
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 459
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ok read through and adding my $.02.

by chance how much hardner are you using? also what is your setup time? body filler has a working time, and when you mix up larger ammounts, and use more hardner, that time decreases... from past experience, about 1" line of the hardner cream to a about a pingpong sized ball of filler works. but sometimes i use more filler. mix it up fast to make sure the color is consistend, then apply using a plastic body spatula. i normally try to lay it smooth as possible to help when having to cut it down. and i too start cutting when it is a little tacky too... i use a body file, looks like a cheese grader to sut down the ridges and thick spots. as for the spot putty filler creams, i tend to not use that. i use a high fill primer and block it out to get rid of the pin holes and small gouges/ lines.

hope this helps, JS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2006, 11:10 AM
ronnied's Avatar
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: 49 Ford
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: clear lake, texas
Posts: 14
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Get Local Help

Its truly an art to shape with fillers. I suggest trying to find a local body shop and buddy up with one of their body men(a six pack will do). When working with fillers start with the roughest file paper, 36 grit on an air file or long board file. When sanding, dont sand up and down or back and forth.. Sand at an angle, say from lower left corner to upper right and reverse this. That is like cross hatching. This is where your new buddy comes in handy as he will be happy to show you. I only finish my fillers with 80 grit and then prime with three heavy coats. I then lightly spray a coat of black spray paint over that surface and hand block starting with 80 grit. Thats called guide coating and will help you find low and high spots. One thing many beginners do is overwork the surface. If you keep hitting metal, back off and add more filler. Get a three foot steel straight edge and make sure your metal is semi straight to begin with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2006, 11:20 AM
jvsapp's Avatar
just a gearhead in paradise..
 

Last journal entry: last ones for now.
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 459
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
good point on the guide coat. same with the cross hatch sanding. i remember a hotrod body work magazine that came out a few months back. covered everything from rust repair to buffing. i was wondering though. am i the only one that has heard of the body file? does any one else use it? when the body filler is still soft, it cuts it down really fast... and it is reusable unlike 36 grit paper.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2006, 11:36 AM
jcclark's Avatar
The Penny Pincher
 

Last journal entry: Hanging Bumpers
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, Ky. U.S.A.
Age: 61
Posts: 1,880
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 4
Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
I still use a body file, but only for the first "shaping"
just to get it close to size.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Body - Exterior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need advice on a paint job tishmomo Body - Exterior 36 01-15-2008 11:19 AM
Run in Clear at a bad spot.. what to do?? Z-Money Pit Body - Exterior 6 06-21-2005 01:53 PM
My Report: ITS BAD. VERY BAD. Native Gearhead Transmission - Rearend 12 09-21-2004 10:30 AM
How long does it take thin amounts of bondo to crack? stonedchihuahua Body - Exterior 14 07-12-2003 08:02 PM
bondo removal question broncoman Body - Exterior 3 06-22-2003 01:16 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.