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Old 01-16-2007, 09:57 AM
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Baking paint

I read through several threads and still didn't find a definitive answer to this.

If you bake the paint at about 175 does it help with the durability of the paint, or the hardness?
Mainly I'm looking at all the small parts I'm painting, either gun or spray cans. The cure time doesn't bother me, I can paint one day to use the part another.
But, does it actually help the paint to cure it with heat?

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Old 01-16-2007, 01:40 PM
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yeah warmer will help it cure but i have never heard 175*....that doesn't mean it s wrong or anything, just never heard that before....I've heard like....let it sit in the sun...or something like that.
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Old 01-16-2007, 03:17 PM
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Baking is done more like at 140 degrees and just accelerates the curing process.

After the product is totally cured the paint is exactly the same whether baking was used or not.
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Old 01-16-2007, 03:27 PM
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Non baked 2k products are far less durable. Also when 2k paint is not baked if you have to re work any of it there is a possibility it will react & wrinkle. For this reason I bake all of my work at 60 degrees metal temp.
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Old 01-16-2007, 06:31 PM
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I would think it would depend on the paint. Some manufacturers recommend no baking, or low temps for short periods, compared to others.

Aaron
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Old 01-16-2007, 09:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve UK
Non baked 2k products are far less durable. Also when 2k paint is not baked if you have to re work any of it there is a possibility it will react & wrinkle. For this reason I bake all of my work at 60 degrees metal temp.
"non baked 2k products" are only less durable temporarily. And if you have time to wait, you can re work an area with out baking it and it will not react or wrinkle anymore than it would if it were baked. In most cases.

Lastly, please tell me that baking at "60*" is a mis-print. Maybe you are baking at 160*? If you are going as high as 160*, be aware that I've seen bug-shields loose their shape at that temp., and rubber bumpers can go hay-wire at less than that.

Baking is purely an issue of production speed!

Where's BarryK on this one?

Last edited by colormecrazy; 01-16-2007 at 10:05 PM.
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Old 01-16-2007, 09:52 PM
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As far as I know, there is no difference in durability weather it is baked or not, just how fast the cure is. Of course there are different clears that are designed for baking booths, vs regular dry. Factory uses different paint that is designed to be baked at much higher temperatures not used by refinishers (would melt all plastics and need to be able to bake at those high temps, ect) and this I believe is suppose to be more durable then whats available for us to use. If someone has proof that baking makes your typical paint available to bodyshops and hobbiests more durable, I want to see where the proof is. It does sound good though to the average consumer when a bodyshop says they bake thier finishes.
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Old 01-17-2007, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colormecrazy
"non baked 2k products" are only less durable temporarily. And if you have time to wait, you can re work an area with out baking it and it will not react or wrinkle anymore than it would if it were baked. In most cases.

Lastly, please tell me that baking at "60*" is a mis-print. Maybe you are baking at 160*? If you are going as high as 160*, be aware that I've seen bug-shields loose their shape at that temp., and rubber bumpers can go hay-wire at less than that.

Baking is purely an issue of production speed!

Where's BarryK on this one?
No, no miss print. I bake all my jobs at 60c degrees metal temp. Thats 80c air temp. The paints I use require baking for warranty etc. I could never air dry a 2k product, it does not harden the same, but thats just my opinion guys. Don't forget the weather in the UK is not that hot most of the year, thats why I had to fit a low bake oven.

The best thing, like others have said is check your product data & use the correct catalist for the temp.
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Old 01-17-2007, 01:48 AM
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Remember guys 60C is the same as 140F so we are all ttalking the same temperature. I always thought the baking just sped up the cure but once cured there was no difference between baked and unbaked. If someone has evidence otherwise I would be interested to hear it.
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Old 01-17-2007, 06:06 AM
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Automotive refinishing paints:

First of all like said you start getting around 160-165 popping, blisters and bumper problems and some Chrysler computers will fry.
Most automotive Refinishing baking is done at the 140 range and this is not baking but heating compared to powder coating and E-coating that would be in area of 400 degrees.

Long story short, baking automotive refinishing paints does nothing but accelerate the curing process.
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:48 AM
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Better baking or air dry, depend on the technical data sheet.
Here is the example:
http://pc.dupont.com/dpc/en/US/html/...366_72500S.pdf

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Old 09-03-2013, 08:54 AM
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But in the other hand for base coat:
http://pc.dupont.com/dpc/en/US/html/...romaPremBC.pdf


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Old 09-03-2013, 10:41 AM
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Barry is absolutely correct...baking does nothing but speed up cure time. Some clears, single stage and primer's, if baked require different temperatures for optimum results and you should check the Tech sheets for each individual product. PPG, when low VOC clears where first mandated required metal temperature of 160 degrees....that's metal temperature, not air temperature...this is a huge toll on the shop owner who is paying the bill at -30 degrees. Other clears (I know Barry doesn't promote his product but, I can), such as SPI's Universal Clear, when baked, should only be baked at 110-120 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes...a huge saving for any shop owner with a booth that has a bake cycle.

Bake or air dry, for automotive refinish products, after time the durability is the same.

Ray
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:16 PM
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I remember years ago we were painting an older Toyota Celica and teacher set it to bake (not sure which temp) but it got so hot that bumper started sagging lol. Owner was less than happy
At work I've used Sherwin Williams HPC15 clear coat (air bake technology) Its supposed to dry and be ready to buff in 15 minutes. It does dry real fast though. I havent tried to buff it. It's expensive as well.
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