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Old 06-05-2008, 10:05 PM
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Beginning Welder Needs Advice

I have a brand new Lincoln Weld Pack 100HD..I attempted my first welds boxing in some leaf spring lift blocks(16 guage I believe; according to the machine it stated D-2 on the knobs). The welder welds for a half a second and then just stops. It doesnt even last long enough to tack anything. It throws a half seconds worth of spatter. Is their a reason why I can only get a half second of work out of the machine before it stops welding like a bad ground or something like that or is it just in my lack of experience and positioning of the wire to the metal? Also I read somewhere on here that the machine works better without an extension cord, any accuracy to this? After reading several posts it seems the mig conversion may help too but seemed people thought it to be more helpful with the thinner metals.?
Thanks
Jason
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Old 06-05-2008, 10:12 PM
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If it is a 110 unit.Maybe you don't have a good duty cycle.
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Old 06-06-2008, 12:33 AM
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Hi,
I dont know what you know so Ill start at the basics

. The welder welds for a half a second and then just stops. It doesnt even last long enough to tack anything.

you need to practice holding an "Arc" which means moving the rod along the job whilst moving the rod into the weld (due to the metal off the rod going into the weld, the rod gets shorter, you have to move it in to keep the arc constant ie gap constant) Also check you have a good earth from the machine to the job and that you have the correct rods for what your doing, get some GP rods from somewhere and practice on scrap.

Also I read somewhere on here that the machine works better without an extension cord, any accuracy to this?
nah, but yes a little , dont stick 50 metres of extension cable on it you do loose a lot of grunt in long runs. Could also be the duty cycle but you should be able to get at least one rod out before it stops.
Roger

Last edited by Torana68; 06-06-2008 at 03:20 AM.
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Old 06-06-2008, 01:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Torana68
Hi,
I dont know what you know so Ill start at the basics

. The welder welds for a half a second and then just stops. It doesnt even last long enough to tack anything.

you need to practice holding an "Arc" which means moving the rod along the job whilst moving the rod into the weld (due to the metal off the rod going into the weld, the rod gets shorter, you have to move it in to keep the arc constant ie gap constant) Also check you have a good earth from the machine to the job and that you have the correct rods for what your doing, get some GP rods from somewhere and practice on scrap.

Also I read somewhere on here that the machine works better without an extension cord, any accuracy to this?
nah, but yes a little , dont stick 50 metres of extension cale on it you do loose a lot of grunt in long runs. Could also be the duty cycle but you should be able to get at least one rod out before it stops.
Roger

also a part to having a good arc is good rod and a good clean surface, and good grounding of the clamp onto the workpiece. When I was learning how to weld, I had issues with sticking the rod to the metal and having to fight it off... then again we started with the 'hard to weld with it' rod (I dont remember the numbers), then to a little easier rod, and finished with easy to weld with rod that I also forgot the number code but was also called 'farmers rod'. That is easy as pie to weld with.

I learned with those dark masks, if you have a bright source of light behind you, you can make out some things (such as where the weld is supposed to be) through the mask. I've mis-placed where I start a weld a few times not being able to see a little of what I'm working on, but at least that was on practice patches of metal.
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Old 06-06-2008, 06:33 AM
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Could this be a symptom of reversed polarity at the welder? Maybe some of the more experienced welders can verify or eliminate that possibility. Or your manual should show a drawing of how the welder is supposed to be wired inside the cabinet...might want to double check it.
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Old 06-06-2008, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevelleSS_LS6
also a part to having a good arc is good rod and a good clean surface, and good grounding of the clamp onto the workpiece. When I was learning how to weld, I had issues with sticking the rod to the metal and having to fight it off... then again we started with the 'hard to weld with it' rod (I dont remember the numbers), then to a little easier rod, and finished with easy to weld with rod that I also forgot the number code but was also called 'farmers rod'. That is easy as pie to weld with.

I learned with those dark masks, if you have a bright source of light behind you, you can make out some things (such as where the weld is supposed to be) through the mask. I've mis-placed where I start a weld a few times not being able to see a little of what I'm working on, but at least that was on practice patches of metal.
Guys, the weld pak is a wire feed, no rod involved.

I would check the polarity it should be DC negative for flux core, but I doubt that is your problem since in my experience reversed polarity makes a weak arc but there is still an arc.

Can you explain a bit better what happens when it stops, does the sound of the welder change? How much far are you keeping the tip from the work (how much wire is sticking out when welding)? Is the metal clean & shiny? Is the ground clamp in a good spot? There are a number of things that could be happening, maybe with a bit more information we can figure out what is going on.

On the cord, my old lincoln 135 welded noticeably better without an extension cord. That being said, it did pretty well with a nice fat 25 foot cord. (Most of the time I did not have a choice).

Do you have any pictures of the blocks? 16 Gauge just does not sound right to me. If it is just the material you are adding that is 16 gauge, you might find it easier to start with pieces that are of similar thickness, when they are dissimilar you have to put more heat to the thicker piece than the thinner. No reason to complicate things like that when you are trying to learn how to run the machine.

Josh

Last edited by JoshF; 06-06-2008 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 06-06-2008, 09:03 AM
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First off an extension DOES make a difference, a big difference! If you must use an extension cord keep it short as possible and make sure it is a heavy gauge cord. It sounds as if you may have a faulty welder however there are a few things to check first. Make sure the lead (gun) is attached firmly at the feed rollers and that all cables are also firmly connected. Make sure the ground clamp is not only attached firmly but that it is connected to a clean surface and that the cable is connected solidly to the clamp. I have seen guys fiddling around with a bad ground when actually it turns out the the cable was not grounding to the clamp itself, happens more often than you might think. Try these checks and get back to us.
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Old 06-06-2008, 09:15 AM
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With oldred on the case here, you've got about the best there is in terms of working through this problem.

One small, and maybe silly, addition to what he said. Without trying to strike an arc, just make sure the wire is feeding smoothly through the machine and out the nozzle. I've had wire hang up or not feed because the roller was not tight enough and then act like you describe because the tip of the wire burns off and if no more is being fed, the arc immediately stops.
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Old 06-06-2008, 11:00 AM
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I was just going to advise to check the roll drive to make sure you are running the right roll for the wire as cboy beat me to it.....
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Old 06-06-2008, 11:05 AM
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We had an issue like this at work too. Try checking the screw that holds the wire roll inside the welder, ours was tight enough last night to actually bind up the spool of wire. You may have the wrong gauge wire. Is your welder gas assisted? If so, you may have flux core wire (which is thicker than the wire used when you have gas assist). Let us know what gauge wire you have in the welder, it should be labled right on the spool.

Take the nozzle assembly off the end of the gun. There should be an outer housing, and then a smaller copper nozzle. Unscrew the nozzle from the end of the cable, and then see if the cable feeds freely. If it does, but the tip moves with it, try a larger tip. One other possibility is that you have a bad roll of wire. My dad has had a "cheaper" roll of wire that was wound up in itself, and would pretty much do as it sounds like yours is doing. Hopefully some of this helps.



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Old 06-06-2008, 12:43 PM
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As the others have mentioned and I have to add a little too:

1. No extension cords unless they are short and at least 12 ga or larger.

2. Make sure you have a good clean ground and the cord is tight in the clamp, make sure your stinger lead is connected tightly into the connectors.

3. Clean the area to be welded with a wire brush, get rid to the rust and crud.

4. Make sure your welder is set up right with proper settings for voltage, wire speed, and the wire is feeding ok out of the handle.

5, Run a test weld on a good clean piece of material to verify correct operation of the welder.

Good luck with your welds.
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Old 06-06-2008, 02:28 PM
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Hi,
I have the same welder works great. I ran flux wire for years and then converted to gas. (Good move)LOL
Nut must be loose on wire spool and try D & 3 works good for me.
Extension cords will make a difference.

Good luck...Glen
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Old 06-06-2008, 04:59 PM
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Maybe your wire is bad, I got a bad roll of fluxcore once, couldnt even make a decent tack.

Sahne
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Old 06-06-2008, 07:28 PM
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An extension cord that is to small will definately hurt any high powered tool. A properly sized cord with quality connectors will have little to no impact. If it is sized correctly a 25 foot extension code will have no more impact than an extra 25 feet of run in the wall. The problems usually come in when some one uses one of those orange cords that look real heavy but are actuall only 16 or 18 gauge.
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Old 06-06-2008, 07:37 PM
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That's right. The extension cord for my 110 volt is made from 12-2 with ground and is only 15 feet long. It also helps to use it in a 20 amp rated outlet.



In a while, Chet.
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