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Old 05-22-2007, 01:55 PM
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Bench Bleeding?

I've read a few post stating that you should bench bleed the MC before you install it in the car. I don't have access to a vice to put the MC in, so I want to put it in the car, and bleed it using the pedal before I install the lines to the MC. I can't see what the difference would be. Can anyone give me some insight into this. Thanks.

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Old 05-22-2007, 08:03 PM
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i used to, and sometimes still do, do it that way.

when you are finished bleeding. rince the whole area with water. to wash away the fluid that will eat your paint.
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Old 05-22-2007, 09:40 PM
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bench bleeding really just means bleeding the master clyinder. You don't HAVE to do it on a bench
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Old 05-22-2007, 10:49 PM
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I bought a few sizes of brake line and cut them then bent them about 270 degrees. I thread them into the outlets with the other end submerged in the reservoir and push the pedal as much as i want.

Then I pull the bleed loops out and quickly install the service lines. That way if any air bubbles in, its right near the lines where it needs to be bled anyway.

but you're right... bench bleeding is just a term. It just refers to bleeding it first, but it doesn't matter if you do it in a vice with a screwdriver or with the pushrod in the car.
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Old 05-23-2007, 09:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curtis73
I bought a few sizes of brake line and cut them then bent them about 270 degrees. I thread them into the outlets with the other end submerged in the reservoir and push the pedal as much as i want.
I've done it this way, too. It works well. I've also skipped bench bleeding altogether to keep from dumping brake fluid on my nicely painted chassis. It just takes longer to bleed the entire system, but it's not a big deal if your body is off the chassis.

Chris
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Old 05-23-2007, 01:55 PM
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On the level

It is important to have the master cylinder level when bleeding it. That may
be partly why the vendors recommend bench bleeding. On 99% of cars the
master cylinder does sit level. On a few it does not.

Dave
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Old 05-23-2007, 06:37 PM
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I've been known to put a big screwdriver in the rear hole of the MC, put the handle against my breastbone, then pull the MC toward me to bleed it.
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Old 05-23-2007, 08:32 PM
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Some Master cylinders have plastic hoses with fittings to match the outlets of the cylinder to do exactly what Curtis suggested.

The general idea behind bench bleeding the mc is to not introduce air to a system where you just swapped mastercylinders. Quite often when swapping cylinders it isn't necessary to bleed the entire system.
With a compete new system it isn't such a big deal as you have to get the air out of the whole system anyhow. You just have to pump longer to get the job done.
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Old 05-23-2007, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HUH?
It is important to have the master cylinder level when bleeding it. That may
be partly why the vendors recommend bench bleeding. On 99% of cars the
master cylinder does sit level. On a few it does not.

Dave
Photo album with pics of current 55 Chevy rebuild
Ummmm...how about jacking up the rear of the car?
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Old 05-24-2007, 12:12 AM
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I've bled brakes for 45 years Professionally and on my personal cars and never heard that the master cylinder needed to be level except that it might help keep the fluid from spilling out the top. When you put pressure on the piston against the fluid inside it doesn't care if if it is level or not.

The reason for "bench" bleeding or bleeding the master cylinder with the brake lines disconnected is to keep from introducing air into the brake lines from an empty master cylinder.
This saves the mechanic the time of getting that air out of the system. You may get a bit of air in the system this way but it can easily and quickly be bled out.

The guys who caution against getting brake fluid on painted surfaces are correct. It will eat paint and eat it quickly if not washed off.
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Old 05-31-2007, 12:55 PM
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I agree with the bench bleeding and possible bench bleeding in the car. Just bleed the mc first on a new system. Some of the more complex mc with built in prop. valves etc it is easy to get air trapped in it that simply won't come out any other way. Level is relative...if it looks ok it probably is ok for this.

From the mech's viewpoint it's a lot easier to install a pre bled mc and not have to bleed the system and possibly bust off a bleeder screw. Time is $$$
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