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Old 02-26-2012, 06:21 AM
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Best way to touchup just a tiny rust spot?

I've considered just sanding the rust gone and touching it up like you would a rock chip on a hood. I've also considered roughing up a larger area than the chip (pea sized chip that has rusted), epoxy primering a small area inside the roughed up (320) area, then base coating a little past the primer to fade the new/old paint color then clearing almost to the edge of the roughed up area. Then wet sanding and buffing.

Are there other options? Are my ideas there not a good way to tackle the problem?

I've been painting and sanding (electric guitar finisher and builder) for a while now but am a rookie on auto body, so pardon my ignorance on that!
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Old 02-26-2012, 07:44 AM
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Your second method sounds like the best way to go. That's a significant "chip".

Are you certain that the rust is not coming though from the inside of the fender? My S10 hood had a similar size rust spot on the outside. When I pulled the insulation from underneath the hood, I found a rust spot about two inches in diameter opposite the small spot on the outside.
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Old 02-26-2012, 08:11 AM
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To make it look right you should clear coat the complete panel. You can blend the paint if you want.
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Old 02-26-2012, 08:31 AM
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Spot paint and clearing the whole panel is the ONLY way I would even think of this repair. Any less and it will fail, most likely you wouldn't even be able to make it look nice at all. The edge of the clear blend will likely show even if you were a pro and knew your stuff.

Masking off the whole panel is just as much work as trying to buff out a blend without cutting too much and ruining it. Masking off the whole panel is BY FAR easier than doing the spot job twice or three times trying to get it right.

This includes going up and over the doors on the roof rail. In my world the roof mouldings would be removed, the quarter window removed, the tail light and the quarter moulding at the "dog leg" (right by the rear door) would be removed. That rear bumper MAY stay, it looks like there is a pretty good gap but it too would probably be removed. That is the best way to do it.

But properly masking the window and roof mouldings, could be done. But clearing the whole roof rail is the only way to go unless you are real well versed in blending. Honestly, masking and prepping the whole thing is WAY easier than you think, it's just a little more time. Once painted and cleared you peel the paper off and WHAM, you are done. When you do a blend, you are still working, you are trying to save that blend if you don't buff it out just right, you can see it, it's a nice car, do it right.

Brian

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Old 02-26-2012, 12:50 PM
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Sounds like everyone would do more or less the same thing. Thanks guys.
One problem and sounds like a single right solution.

If this were lacquer I'm guessing this could just just be burned into the old finish? Too bad things change!
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Old 02-26-2012, 01:34 PM
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If I were going to do anything but completely clearing that panel I would simply clean out the rust brush some epoxy in there and brush paint over it and leave it at that.

Brian
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Old 02-27-2012, 09:38 AM
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This what I have done..and I am not saying it's the right way but it worked for me. I cut a hole in a piece of cardboard, the same size as the paint chip I lightly feathered with some sandpaper, about 1/2 in diameter, sprayed it with a spray can. White is the color of my truck, you have to know where the repair is to see it. Don't try to do this with one coat, I did 3 light blasts. Let it set for a few weeks, a light buffing and some wax. Obviously this won't work for a lot of colors and metallics, but it looks better than a chip.
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Old 02-27-2012, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dinger
This what I have done..and I am not saying it's the right way but it worked for me. I cut a hole in a piece of cardboard, the same size as the paint chip I lightly feathered with some sandpaper, about 1/2 in diameter, sprayed it with a spray can. White is the color of my truck, you have to know where the repair is to see it. Don't try to do this with one coat, I did 3 light blasts. Let it set for a few weeks, a light buffing and some wax. Obviously this won't work for a lot of colors and metallics, but it looks better than a chip.
That makes sense, I assume you didn't primer or epoxy it before the color no clear after color?

Obviously the proper way and the way that no one would ever know would be what is described by others. But as you said, probably possible to make it to where you'd have to know to look for it.
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Old 03-01-2012, 11:08 AM
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I just used rattle can, I had some white Krylon enamel, it worked well. Been about 6 months, still holding up great.
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Old 03-01-2012, 11:46 AM
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Well Repair done. I did a combination of things that were given as suggestions here.

Here's what I did:
-Sanded the rust gone (taped off around the spot so I wouldn't scratch the surrounding paint with 220). Then I removed the tape and feathered it to 320.
-Bondo-ed the small indentation (looked like a .177 pellet hit the car)
-Small block level sanded most of the Bondo gone except in the pellet sized dent
-Mixed white pigment in epoxy and brushed on one coat, then anther a couple hours later
-Sanded it level with the block(taped around the spot to not sand through the surrounding paint) then removed the masking and feathered the area and made sure it was scuffed
-Sprayed White Lacquer (nitrocellulose) to bend in the touchup
-Sprayed just a coat of clear nitrocellulose to cover.
-I should add I wiped with Naptha after every sanding step and before any coating (epoxy or other) was added

I didn't do the panel as I would have if I wanted it perfect. End result? Not perfect, close enough though and definitely not bad. I'm probably going to brush over it with 2000 grit and a light buffing to blend the sheen. If you look at it in the right light angle you can see the clear lacquer. Probably shouldn't have cleared it but I figured it'd give me a little 2000 grit smoothing and buffing leeway.

It was good enough that my wife had to ask where the spot was.

My color mix was a little off. I shot pure white for the first light coat or two. After looking at it added a hint of black and some oxide yellow to off white it a touch, I wish I would have done that from the start. But it's good enough for now. Maybe the sun and dirt will do the off whiting for me over time... probably too optimistic. If it turns out that it looks bad later I can always remove it with solvent. But I think it'll hold up ok. We'll see. It's thin enough that it shouldn't cold crack even though it's lacquer.

Thankfully white hides a lot since the reflection of the gloss isn't like it'd be with black. I'm not sure this repair would have worked on a black car, probably not and if I were paying someone to do body work I wouldn't have payed much for a guy to do a quick fix like this. It only took about 1 hour total. I'm sure the proper repair would hold up better long term. This isn't going to be bullet proof like redoing the panel would be, but this definitely looks better than the rust!
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:59 AM
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I have done chip repair with an air brush with good results. I simply cleaned the area to bare metal with a pic, primer with self etch, and spot in the chip with an air brush. I just build the chip in stages until it is level or just above. Wet sand and buff and it is almost invisible. This works very well with solid colors. Metallics obviously will not blend as well.
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Old 03-03-2012, 02:24 PM
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I've gotta say I cannot see any evidence of the repair, but pictures tend to hide a lot as well.
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Old 03-06-2012, 05:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
Spot paint and clearing the whole panel is the ONLY way I would even think of this repair. Any less and it will fail, most likely you wouldn't even be able to make it look nice at all. The edge of the clear blend will likely show even if you were a pro and knew your stuff.

Masking off the whole panel is just as much work as trying to buff out a blend without cutting too much and ruining it. Masking off the whole panel is BY FAR easier than doing the spot job twice or three times trying to get it right.

This includes going up and over the doors on the roof rail. In my world the roof mouldings would be removed, the quarter window removed, the tail light and the quarter moulding at the "dog leg" (right by the rear door) would be removed. That rear bumper MAY stay, it looks like there is a pretty good gap but it too would probably be removed. That is the best way to do it.

But properly masking the window and roof mouldings, could be done. But clearing the whole roof rail is the only way to go unless you are real well versed in blending. Honestly, masking and prepping the whole thing is WAY easier than you think, it's just a little more time. Once painted and cleared you peel the paper off and WHAM, you are done. When you do a blend, you are still working, you are trying to save that blend if you don't buff it out just right, you can see it, it's a nice car, do it right.

Brian

haha now list off the flat rate shop way...
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizer
I've gotta say I cannot see any evidence of the repair, but pictures tend to hide a lot as well.
ha ha, I'd like to be able to say I couldn't see any evidence either but you can at the right angle. When I sprayed it, it was super bright out and it was almost impossible to see unless you were just right. When it's cloudy or less bright it shows up more. Also the frost hits it different. I'm guessing because old vs new paint and a different material (lacquer). I'm going to try hitting it with fine wet dry and buffing to see if I can't blend it.
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