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Old 08-21-2013, 11:23 PM
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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
 
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"Bodywork Restoration Tutorial" DVD Review

A co-worker loaned me this DVD today and I came home watched every minute of it and I must recommend it to all who want to learn how to fabricate sheetmetal or even for the fabricator to learn a new trick or two. It's located at.... Home - Our Online Shop



It covers just about all aspects of making sheetmetal panels and structures using simple hand tools and home made tools. This was one of the things that impressed me the most. While many of the videos I have seen are basically showing you how to use a tool they sell, often an expensive tool. This video shows some very creative ways to make parts using scrapes of metal, and home made tools and hammers. Very, very interesting indeed.

It covers all aspects from cutting to flanging, to welding (this is what really grabbed me) and metal finishing.

It really shows some great stuff very similar to what John is showing in his thread on rust repair on his Chevy. Creating complex parts from nothing using simple tools. Also one of the things that grabbed me is an Aston Martin door skin he installs. What is cool is just looking at the inner shell of this door that was made by Aston Martin, it is extremely simple! And could be made by any of us in our garages. It really demystifies sheetmetal fabrication, very well done indeed!

Brian

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Old 08-22-2013, 09:43 PM
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I went to the site with the intentions to order but a 38 converts to about $60. Just bought new TV and stand so I guess that is on hold for now

John
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:54 PM
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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
 
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You know about 80% of the tricks I would say, maybe 90%. You know how those types of lessons are, I was slapping my forehead over and over with simple tips that just go missed if not for something like that video.

Brian
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
You know about 80% of the tricks I would say, maybe 90%. You know how those types of lessons are, I was slapping my forehead over and over with simple tips that just go missed if not for something like that video.

Brian
Absolutely! I have never watched one of these "tin benders" type videos that I didn't pick up some neat tips. None of us ever knows it all.

John
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Old 08-22-2013, 10:04 PM
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Here is a picture of one of the repairs they say they make on the video. I would have really enjoyed seeing how they did the detail on it.

John

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Old 08-22-2013, 10:45 PM
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looks like a bead roller. Try you tube.

funny cause Martin mentions using bare essential tools in that video but the guy with the most videos on you tube is named Lazze and on one of his videos he caught himself and stopped himself from saying you need 2 $3000 lazze bead rollers so you don't have to go changing those pesky dies. Apart from that, his videos are pretty cool. Tipping dies are pretty awesome.
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Old 08-22-2013, 11:09 PM
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He didn't use a bead roller on that floor, we are talking basic tools. He used flat metal stock that guy could buy at the local hardware store for two dollars and hammer formed those pieces.

Brian
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Old 08-22-2013, 11:31 PM
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that's cool. I don't have the time in the world to do all that hammering. I'd rather do that on a bead roller but nonetheless it's a great skill to have.
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Old 08-23-2013, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
He didn't use a bead roller on that floor, we are talking basic tools. He used flat metal stock that guy could buy at the local hardware store for two dollars and hammer formed those pieces.

Brian
I have his videos, he is just amazing and I'm surprised that he doesn't have arms like popeye.

They say that metal forming machines just make the work faster and you could do it all with hand tools, but David is the only one that I have seen prove it.
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Old 08-23-2013, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Chevymon View Post
I have his videos, he is just amazing and I'm surprised that he doesn't have arms like popeye.

They say that metal forming machines just make the work faster and you could do it all with hand tools, but David is the only one that I have seen prove it.
I was thinking the same thing as I watched the video. I kept thinking how I am not sure if I could do that, if my arm would fall off or something. That was one reason I moved into the office at work, door skins would KILL me. I just figured it was time for me to drift away from that. Now I find myself doing it at home and I am hanging in there pretty good. But watching that video I thought to myself, "Can I still be doing this?" But of course it doesn't have to be done like he does, but damn it is fascinating what the guy can do with a hammer.

Brian
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Old 08-23-2013, 08:04 AM
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Here is a picture of one of the repairs they say they make on the video. I would have really enjoyed seeing how they did the detail on it.

John

He uses flat stock clamped to a table and a chisel like tool to hit with a hammer along the edge. It's pretty wild how he smoothes it all out with a million and a half hammer blows. He beats the hell out of something then planishes it back to smooth.

Brian
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Old 08-23-2013, 08:05 AM
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it's one of those things where you'd get a whole lot more respect but at the same time I'd be finding easier ways to get the same results. I once saw a video of a guy making a quarter panel by hand and it was the most impressive thing I've ever seen to this day.
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Old 08-23-2013, 03:22 PM
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I have been eyeballing that video for sometime.

If i ever win the lottery I would love to take a class in old fashioned metal working.

There is a guy who posts on a number of forums including the Garage Journal who is a master metal worker and gives classes. He goes by MP&C? He posts lots of good stuff and answers questions and gives guidance freely. There is also a guy in the Pacific Northwest who actually provides lodging as part of a vacation metal working experience. I thing he specializes in VW's and Porches'

Someday...
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Old 08-23-2013, 03:44 PM
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DAVID GARDINER, uk

David is on a lot of the metal shaping forums, does fantastic work out of a very small shop. He has posted a lot of good info. I took a week end course from Ron Covelle a few years ago and I expected to see a big shop with every tool you could imagine, Not so. I think he got a power hammer - pullmax type machine from some company that wanted their machines in use in classes and video's. just recently. I"ve never seen a pullmax in any of lazze's Utubes. I frequent the metal forming sites, Down at the winter home-shop I am about half way converting an old atlas Potatoe box staple machine into a dedicated thumb nail shrinker and an old saw filing machine from a steel mill into a Pullmax type machine, just smaller. And I have stuff from the junk farm machinery pile to build a louver press and 3 roll powered slip roller. It just takes more time than I have.
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:19 PM
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Ron Covell /Professor Hammer.....Now theres a guy I'd love to meet,Can you imagine living next door to a guy like that...he'd hate me I'd always be running over and hanging out with him every time he opened his garage door....
I've been in the body and paint biz all my life and still these guys make me feel like a newb.
if you think making body panels is fasinating you should see someone make a suit of armor and theres tons of other stuff unrelated to cars you can keep yourself busy doing with metal shaping....
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