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Old 10-04-2006, 08:20 PM
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Bondo Swelling?

Recently I removed my door handles by welding a patch on the inside of the door. After finishing it off and letting it sit about a month I water sanded and buffed. Every time it gets hot, the area where the patch is shows up. When it cools it goes away. Anyone ever see this before?

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Old 10-04-2006, 09:15 PM
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Did you weld the patch completely or just tack it in several places? The ghost you are seeing is from expansion and contraction. Always weld the seams up solid and butt weld whenever possible.
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Old 10-05-2006, 06:24 AM
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Bondo Swelling

I welded the patch about 80%. What do I have to do to repair it?
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Old 10-05-2006, 07:01 AM
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Remove the filler, weld the patch complete, grind your welds down and make sure the steel is completely clean, apply two coats of epoxy primer and allow to cure overnight, blend in the area with Everglass followed by regular bodyfiller, prime, sand, and paint. Coat the backside with epoxy followed by seamsealer around the seam followed by a wax based rust preventative coating. Or for a better quality approach remove the patch, fab a new piece and butt weld it in flush, metalfinishing it to the best of your ability. Body solder could also be used to blend in the repair area after the seam is welded solid.

The reason the seam is showing is from expansion and contraction of the two pieces of metal-they actually will move some unless it is welded solid, the movement over time will seperate the filler bond at the seamed area, and the open void between the two pieces will draw and hold moisture into your filler from the backside of the panel. If you apply filler over a seam the seam needs to be welded complete.
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Old 10-05-2006, 03:11 PM
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You know, I found something years ago about this subject that may be of interest to you. I found that if you welded something, ground the weld and then applied filler the filler would "swell" right over that weld. I found that the weld being thicker metal would retain the heat from welding it, and grinding it more than the surrounding area.

I started letting the weld cool a long time before applying filler and never saw it again.

Brian
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Old 10-05-2006, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baddbob
Remove the filler, weld the patch complete, grind your welds down and make sure the steel is completely clean, apply two coats of epoxy primer and allow to cure overnight, blend in the area with Everglass followed by regular bodyfiller, prime, sand, and paint.


Bad Bob has this one by the horns. But, I wanted to add that the epoxy should be sanded with 80 grit before Everglase is applied. Everglase needs a mechanical tooth (scratches) to hold on to. And I would reapply one good coat of epoxy to seal off the metal exposed during body work before I primed it.

Good Luck!
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Old 10-05-2006, 05:00 PM
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I see no reason to need to sand the epoxy to apply Everglass. My understanding is that it will adhere by the same means as the regular filler does to epoxy, since it has polyester resins in it too.

Aaron
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Old 10-05-2006, 05:39 PM
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Yep, its a polyester product just like regular bodyfiller, but has glass strands as a filler material. I don't see why it should really be any different then plastic filler, but It wouldn't hurt to sand the epoxy for piece of mind. I normally will scuff my epoxy when applying filler or if not repriming within a few hours, but thats just me. I can't bring myself not to sand, you know bodywork isn't suppose to be too easy.
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Old 10-05-2006, 06:00 PM
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Thanks for the support Kenseth. Sorry guys, maybe I'm old fashion, but, I don't put any kind of filler on anything without sanding it first. I think filler mil thickness is a bit excessive for a "chemical" adhesion. Some scratches to hold on to can't hurt. Specially, when we are dealing with stretching and swelling.
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Old 10-05-2006, 06:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colormecrazy
Thanks for the support Kenseth. Sorry guys, maybe I'm old fashion, but, I don't put any kind of filler on anything without sanding it first. I think filler mil thickness is a bit excessive for a "chemical" adhesion. Some scratches to hold on to can't hurt. Specially, when we are dealing with stretching and swelling.
================================
Thats ok, stick around and we will teach you the right way!
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Old 10-05-2006, 06:55 PM
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The only thing that I know about being "old fashioned" is from the times I started doing body work, in high school, about the time you guys were born, we used to work the metal where we didn't have to put all of that filler in it. Body fillers were never applied over any paint. Metal was ground rough, and usually had holes drilled in it for the filler that was added to bite into. Since then, I have tried to keep up with the technology and the advantages that have come up. Now, with the use of Epoxy primers, if done within the window, filler can be applied over it, and sanding is not necessary. Since this is a chemical bond, it should be stronger than the slight mechanical bond that you would get from sanding. If it isn't necessary to sand before the next step, it saves me work.

Aaron
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Old 10-05-2006, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK
================================
Thats ok, stick around and we will teach you the right way!

You must be a sales rep!!!!

And I doubt you have it in you to show me much!!

Specially about the "right way". You don't know me from Adam! If you did you certainly would not have said that!!!

Stick to pushing your SPI!
Don't screw with me about proper methods!
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Old 10-05-2006, 07:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colormecrazy
You must be a sales rep!!!!

And I doubt you have it in you to show me much!!

Specially about the "right way". You don't know me from Adam! If you did you certainly would not have said that!!!

Stick to pushing your SPI!
Don't screw with me about proper methods!
=============================================
Oh my!

Last edited by BarryK; 10-05-2006 at 07:26 PM.
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Old 10-05-2006, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colormecrazy
You must be a sales rep!!!!

And I doubt you have it in you to show me much!!

Specially about the "right way". You don't know me from Adam! If you did you certainly would not have said that!!!

Stick to pushing your SPI!
Don't screw with me about proper methods!
You obviously have alot to learn, besides the proper way to do body work.
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Old 10-05-2006, 07:32 PM
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Please do correct! If I'm wrong!

Otherwise, stick to knowing your product. I'll stick to knowing what works in the real world. My advise here is based on many years of production work. You may have heard of Caliber Collision of Colleyville. I painted about 7 cars a day there for many years. Now, I,ve reserved to doing restoration with my knowledge. I've made many mistakes, and learned from them. Application is the best teacher.

Come by and see me at Mohr Restoration in North Richland Hills, if your around. I'll show you what I'm capable of and we'll discuss my confidence then.

Thanks, by the way. It's nice to let a little steam sometimes.
Best Wishes!
No hard feelings here. Shop life is no place to leave your feelers hanging out!
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