Breakin Down a Tire - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Garage - Tools
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 06:39 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southeast Missouri
Posts: 121
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Breakin Down a Tire

anyone know of any tools or somethin similar to break down a tire? we blew a tire the other day on the 35 horse Massey we got and we ended up takin the wheel and tire to town to get it broke down. thanks

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 06:48 PM
Henry Highrise's Avatar
Lost in the 60's
 
Last wiki edit: Removing stuck fasteners Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Dixieland
Age: 69
Posts: 15,189
Wiki Edits: 4

Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
You can get a bead breaker from Harbor Freight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 07:01 PM
31 five window
 

Last journal entry: Master cylinder
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: louisiana
Age: 57
Posts: 1,577
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Put a 2X6 like a ramp and drive a heavy vehicle up until the bead breaks loose. You may have to do it in several places if tire is stuck or rusted to rim.Go to NAPA and buy 2 tire irons to peel it off after breaking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 07:07 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southeast Missouri
Posts: 121
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well we drove a vehicle onto the tire but it wasn't a very heavy one....1991 Toyota Pickup 4 banger 5 speed with big Timberline L/T's on it....we rotated the tire a few times and tried to use a tire iron on it but it just wouldn't break down
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 07:07 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Abbotsford, B.C, Canada
Age: 50
Posts: 180
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
re:breakin down a tire

Hi did you get the enjoyment of moving it around with the calcuim in it? DIGGING END OF PICK AXE, swing away! TROY
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 07:10 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southeast Missouri
Posts: 121
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
haha idk about all that...that wheel is pretty damn rusty...we're gonna have to do some patch up work around the valve stem cause it rusted through if that tells ya anything.....prolly the stock wheel from 1954 lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 07:17 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Abbotsford, B.C, Canada
Age: 50
Posts: 180
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re: Breakin Down Atire

Hi ya l thought you would like that, l've been there,thank god for having more than l front end loader, its to bad you lost the caluim($) and them rims are hard to get anymore, so ya weldings the best answer, but ya l have broke down the bead with a pick axe, put l'm not 20 anymore so l pay! TROY
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 08:11 PM
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Calculating tire size
Last journal entry: Changes...
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Montreal
Age: 29
Posts: 532
Wiki Edits: 2

Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
you could but the tire under a truck and then put a jack between the tire and the truck frame.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2008, 08:35 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: white house tn.
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
sweat

There is a tool called a bead hammer,it's a sledge on one side and a large smooth slightly curved chisel head on the other.I have had good luck breaking down old rusty truck and tractor beads with mine.You have to be pretty accurate with your swings because your objective is to hit exactly between the rim and the bead.The problem is if you miss ya got another spot in your rim to repair.should you go this way the best way is to start real easy until you get your accuracy down then give it h***.Just keep rotating and hitting it will eventually break the bead,or your enthusiasm.The pick axe is a little to light for truck or tractor old stuff.Plus you would have to grind the edge down to avoid some real damage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2008, 02:31 PM
Member
 

Last journal entry: frame build
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: sioux falls, sd
Age: 68
Posts: 601
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
With a tire hammer and some dish soap, you can breakdown just about any tire you can lay flat. Somtimes it is better to use a small sledge to drive the beadbreaker in cause if you slip and hit the rim instead of the tire, it probably going to give your shin a raspberry you won;t forget for a long time.. tip side to side a couple times to work the soap down and work your way around. Seldom have to go over half way around before it gives.Or maybe just take it to a tire shop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2008, 09:01 PM
grouch's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: How to document your project
Last journal entry: 1949 Olds -- Rotisserie, pt. 9
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: KY
Posts: 1,143
Wiki Edits: 2

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by troy norrad
Hi ya l thought you would like that, l've been there,thank god for having more than l front end loader, its to bad you lost the caluim($) and them rims are hard to get anymore, so ya weldings the best answer, but ya l have broke down the bead with a pick axe, put l'm not 20 anymore so l pay! TROY
Oh, those rims are not too hard to get.

Got a mason's chisel or some splitting wedges or the end of a leaf spring? Drive 'em in until they just 'clink' solid against the wheel, move over about 6 inches and do it again. Repeat all the way around the bead. Won't look like you're accomplishing a thing until you get all the way around. Mix brake fluid and water and pour that in the little gap you just started. Continue around the rim, angling downward as much as the gap allows. By the end of the 2nd trip around the rim, you should see quite a bit of gap. Keep going and it will break down.

Builds character.

Used to change truck tires and tractor tires as a part-time job after school, too many decades ago. We had what amounted to long slide hammers with dull chisel points for breaking those beads down -- heavy pipe with a solid rod through it. Not certain they're still made today, but you could make one with a 4 ft length of 2" pipe, an axle and a 3" mason's chisel.

[Edited to add:]
Found one!
Ken-tool 35926 Heavy Duty Impact Bead Breaker

Looks like it has been improved slightly:
Quote:
The 35926 has exclusive spring action design to reduce user fatigue associated with slide hammer kickback. 5" in length, 80" extended. Weight: 23 lbs.
Didn't have springs or that comfy-looking handle when I had to use similar things. I was swindled!

Last edited by grouch; 03-10-2008 at 09:20 PM. Reason: found tool
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2008, 09:22 AM
schnitz's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Building a new shop
Last journal entry: Christmas 2008 came early!!!
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, in a house...
Age: 40
Posts: 1,163
Wiki Edits: 54

Thanks: 8
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Back when I was under 10 years old, my dad had a rear tire go flat on his 706 IH. He used a chain, a hy-lift jack and a ton o' cursing to break the bead. Just don't ask him about the starting fluid and a match to re-seat it....



In a while, Chet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2008, 08:40 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: minnesota
Posts: 176
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you have a tire rusted to the rim use heat. Heat the rim around the bead area with a torch. Stop heating when the tire starts to smoke.Follow up with one of the above methods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2008, 09:12 PM
schnitz's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Building a new shop
Last journal entry: Christmas 2008 came early!!!
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, in a house...
Age: 40
Posts: 1,163
Wiki Edits: 54

Thanks: 8
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougMN
If you have a tire rusted to the rim use heat. Heat the rim around the bead area with a torch. Stop heating when the tire starts to smoke.Follow up with one of the above methods.

I'm not going to completely back that one up. I used to routinely see area farmers use starting fluid as a "boost"to get farm wagon/ tractor tires to seat on the bead. I'm not sure I'd want to test the big bang theory....


In a while, Chet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 03-28-2008, 05:45 PM
leldai73's Avatar
Its just metal,you're the boss
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: pennsylvania
Age: 26
Posts: 265
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
for tractor, skidder and truck tires we use a tire hammer and a few tires irons, one custom made unit thats 5 feet long...whats a tire hammer you ask? well, here ya go

to re-seat the bead we use a tool called a cheetah . its like a really short air cannon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Garage - Tools posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Canadian Tire wrecks engine 4 Jaw Chuck Hotrodders' Lounge 31 12-09-2010 10:39 PM
I Think Someone Doesn't Like Me. (3rd tire problem) Ghetto Jet Hotrodders' Lounge 12 05-22-2009 05:15 AM
Not a hot rod tire question but it could be old-bill-t Suspension - Brakes - Steering 13 03-04-2008 09:29 PM
A Tire Happenings Synopsis hobbytires General Rodding Tech 21 12-03-2007 05:18 PM
How to determine effective tire diameter sabino56 Transmission - Rearend 19 10-27-2006 09:19 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.