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Old 04-27-2006, 07:42 AM
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Buffing Advice

I currently use Hookit foam waffle pads on a DA with my fine cut compound and finish glaze. i am looking to see if there is a better way.

Should I buy a buffer and use some other different pads? I am currently wet sanding a single stage paint, but usually do BC/CC.

I have been using Mequires compound. I also have some 3M leveling compound, but I think it is a little harsh compares to the #2 Mequires. I then finish with #7 polish.

Looking for the most efficient method.

Thanks

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Old 04-27-2006, 09:14 AM
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when U say DA do you mean a G100 (porter cable) polisher ? Or a DA sander ? If U are using the G100 its not a very efficiant way to Buff as its more of a detail tool for final polishing. I use a rotory with wool pad and #85 to remove my sand marks then #83 with a foam polish pad . I will then switch to the G100 foam polish pad with #82 to remove the swirl marks and final with the *80 speed glaze. hand polish with *7 , Then I wax after the proper cure time.

Lots of usfull info http://meguiarsonline.com

Last edited by Springer; 04-27-2006 at 09:19 AM.
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Old 04-27-2006, 09:20 AM
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I have been using a DA sander with the 3M attachment to use the Hook-it pads.
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Old 04-27-2006, 09:55 AM
adtkart@aol.com
 
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In all honesty, I have never heard of someone using a DA for Buffing. My understanding is that the attachment you are using is actually for applying a Machine Glaze, not for buffing. That is the equivalent of one of those "so called buffers" you can get at Walmart, that are more in line with removing and polishing wax after it is applied.

There are many different Buffing Pads, for use with a Buffer. Some are for Cutting, and some for Polishing. The buffer will need to run about 2500 rpm in a circular motion, not orbital. Your best bet is to get one that has a control for adjusting the speed. Between the heat from the pad and the cutting action of the compound, you get rid of the sanding marks and get your smooth shine.

I am not a professional, so maybe one of them will chime in with some particulars.

Aaron
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:37 AM
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I agree with the comments about the circular buffer for initial buffing after sanding. I do not agree with the wool pad however. It is way too easy for a novice to burn a paint job with a wool pad, especially on the edges and body lines. Good foam pads, one for cutting, one for glaze, and one for polishing is all you need in addition to Mequires or 3M compounds.

The Porter Cable orbital buffer does a great job, but it takes a little longer than the traditional circular buffer. Up side is that it is near impossible to screw up a paint job with the Porter Cable buffer.

My son had his black Vette back at the body shop yesterday to do some final buffing after some repair on the drivers door. The shop is a top quality shop that is known for high dollar paint jobs on street rods and customs. I watched the guy buff the Vette and he did not use a wool pad, only foam. I asked him if they ever used wool pads, and he replied "not in this shop". FWIW

Vince
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:48 AM
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boonstein

Hey guys, I use a dewalt DW849 buffer. You can adjust it from 0-3000 rpm.
Use 3M-extra cut compound with a wool pad at 1800 rpm. Then use 3M-foam pad polishing compound with a foam pad at 1800rpm. Then I use a hand rubbing cleaner and hand polish. If you have color sanded the paint all this doesn't take as long as it sounds like it would. You will like the results.
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Old 04-27-2006, 11:10 AM
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I too was trying to buff using an orbital buffer before buying the DeWalt, the difference was amazing. I can also attest to what can happen if you get careless with a wool pad so foam is what I use now. After I bought the DeWalt a couple of months ago I was looking for advice on the best type and brand of pads and after trying several I have found the 3M "hookit" system with foam to work best for me. I am by no means an expert but with this system I got great results and had no more burned paint problems.
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:00 PM
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I only gave what I use .. Wool is still considered the best for aggresive cutting and it is not for the inexperianced. Foam will do a great job but it has less cutting power but is best for the novice also 6.5" pads work nicely for the beginner, I like them for doing around trim and on the bikes I do . I prefer a good wool pad to the foam for initial buffing after color sanding . If its just a clean up I use a foam polish pad . But then again I have been doing it this way for 30 years. But to each their own.

Also the its better to use a polish foam pad and compound if your just starting out because its far less aggressive than a cutting pad . And use different pads for each product Never use the same pad for compound and polish...

A good variable speed unit is the Hitachi SP18VA it can be had for 99 bucks at coastal tool. http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/S...2df+1146238029


I
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:18 PM
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Well, I have ordered a new buffer. The advice I got about the DA for buffing seems to not be real good. I will still try to use the Hook it foam pads to see if this goes OK. The last vehicle I did with the DA and foam pads turned out ok. I was using the DA in locked mode so it was just turning, not dual action. I am sure that the buffer will work better.

Thanks for the help.
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:27 PM
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Springer, I guess that sounded a bit like I was trying to say that foam is better than wool but that is not at all what I meant. From what I have read it would seem most of the pros do use wool and I assume they have a good reason. My point was that foam will give excellent results in the hands of someone with little experience and seems to be a bit safer but maybe it is better to learn the proper way from the start.
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:46 PM
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The foam pads do make it harder to screw up the paint, but NOT IMPOSSIBLE, atleast not for me. LOL If the pad goes dry, and gets hot, it WILL wrinkle the paint. They are easier on us novices though. Keep in mind that there are alot of different foam pads. They are not all the same, as some are for buffing and some for polishing.

Aaron
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Old 04-27-2006, 01:54 PM
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Oldred I totally agree with u a beginner should always use foam pads for all their work . And use a polish pad instead of a compound pad as they are far less aggressive and a little more foregiving .

Wool pads can and will ruin a paint job in a split second. Best way to start out buffing is to go to a body shop and get a take off hood or deck lid that was getting tossed and just practice .

rcm800 I have seen people get very good results using a DA sander . if used with the proper pads not the garbage Black and decker stuff u find at the hardware store. But u will be get faster and most likely better results with arotory buffer. But and this is a big one with a rotory it is very easy to get swirls and holograms . It just the nature of the beast . Thats why I use the G100 (porter cable) dual action buffer to do my final buff ...

This was done with the G100 final buff with *80 speed glaze on a w-9006 finish pad set on #2 speed setting about 1000rpm. I just went out and snapped these off
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Old 04-27-2006, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adtkart
The foam pads do make it harder to screw up the paint, but NOT IMPOSSIBLE, atleast not for me. LOL If the pad goes dry, and gets hot, it WILL wrinkle the paint. They are easier on us novices though. Keep in mind that there are alot of different foam pads. They are not all the same, as some are for buffing and some for polishing.

Aaron
Do u have a variable speed buffer? If so then try a slower setting
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:34 AM
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I had always used wool pads and just recently tried foam.
I got fed up with the foam pads real fast and went right back to the wool pads.

However, I do agree that using a wool pad takes a little practice because you can grab an edge and burn through the paint in an instant. Once you do get the hang of it, it's no problem at all. Just hold the buffer so the rotation direction is going away from edges.

I just did a 2k single stage job and sanded it with 1500. I buffed it using a wool pad with 3M Imperial Microfinish compound and then with a fresh wool pad with 3M Finesse-It II. I then finished it off with 3M Finishing Glaze on a D/A with a foam pad. It came out fantastic.

Last edited by roger1; 04-28-2006 at 12:49 PM.
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Old 04-28-2006, 08:07 AM
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I have an IR Air Polisher, like they used to use. Thats been working well for me. Right now I have 2 kinds of foam pads and the Menzerna 'all in one' compound called 'Intensive'. Kind of sweet, goes from 2000 grit scratches to done with just one compound. I have the swirl-mark remover stuff too, but havn't used that much...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/INGER...spagenameZWD1V
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