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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 07-18-2003, 02:07 AM
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I built a temporary garage off the side of the house using the driveway slab as my floor. I have space to walk around my car and 5 extra feet on the side for storage/working. There are no shingles on the nearly flat, one sided roof and no wall along the house, just a 2x4 brace. I installed a row of flourescent lights along the house. The people door consists of a 2x8' sheet between 24" center framing and the car door swings sideways on two hinges and is 8' wide by 6' high. The garage dimentions are 14'x20'x(8'8"-9'1"). I have a 2' overhang on the 20' wall and left the spaces between the roof and wall open for ventilation/light. Total cost was $572 canadian. Took me 2 days to put 'er up. Doing a high quality complete frame off restore of my '69 Camaro. BEAT THAT!

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 07-18-2003, 10:34 PM
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Lots of good info here. I would also suggest going with a 12 Ft side wall. I am not sure what type of construction you are concidering, but I would suggest steel. It is cheaper, and goes up much quicker. Also with steel you can go with a 1 pitch roof and keep the overall hieght about the same as your house.

I built mine 30x40x12. I used steel construction and alumnafoil insulation. Very easy to put up and has a R19 insulation factor. I have two projects, lots of junk, an room for my extended cab driver. It is tight, but the room is good. I still wish I had 10 more feet on the length. You cant have too much room.

Chris
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Old 07-18-2003, 11:43 PM
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Building your own garage - here are a few tips from someone who has done it

I designed and built my own garage several years ago. I agree with the other posts. One of the best things I did was to get some stakes and string and mock up the garage in the back yard with that. Drive your car in there and visualize where your workbench, doors, etc will be. I built mine 24 feet wide which is just right for the car and work bench considerations. Another thing I did was putting an electrical outlet every 4 feet about 6 feet high from the floor. When you fill you garage with junk, you can still get to your outlets. Another time saver was to put the work bench the entire length of the garage so you can lay your tools and parts down while you are working on the motor. Directly above the workbench, I have a string of individual trays to put the nuts, bolts, etc in all layed out where you can see them without opening and closing drawers on those bolt organizer boxes. Saves a lot of time. Also put up pegboard right behind the workbench, and hang your most often used tools up there. Big time saver. Another thing is security. In our area theaves would target a detatched garage. They would break in late at night, you would never hear them, and they would make off with all your tools. Plan on putting in some type of security system before you move your valuables in. When you have your concrete pored, use the fibered concrete in conjunction with the wire re-enforcement to keep the cracking down to a minimum. If the building code will not let you build the 12 foot high ceiling, consider digging a pit deep enough to stand up in and work on the car.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 07-19-2003, 01:57 PM
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Remember, no matter how big the garage, sooner or later it will be too full of stuff to park a car in. Therefore bigger is better, & too big will someday be just right. In a similar vein, there is no such thing as too much electric service. Also, be sure they put plastic under the slab so moisture won't invade all your nice non-rusty stuff.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 07-20-2003, 10:49 AM
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Thanks for the reminder on the construction poly under the concrete. Did that on the last one - never had a problem with damp floor or bare metal rusting. Had the site cleared this week - Had 5 huge (30 year old) pine trees cut, stumps ground, and removed. I've gotten in contact with 3 potential contractors to build the garage, at least to rough in and bricked to match the house. If codes will approve, its starting to look like we'll go with 28 x 50, with 12' walls.
I live on a 1 acre residential lot in Nashville, Tn. Pole barns, steel buildings, etc. are not allowed. Kinda miss living in the country, were I could have built more for less, had room for more project cars, etc. But family and job come first.
In my last garage, I used a 4 x 8 piece of t-slotted paneling called slatwall instead of pegboard. It is great for hanging tools, storage baskets, shelves, etc. It is the material you see used in a lot of retail displays. I'm looking for a CHEAP source for this. Would be great to find it cheap enough to use it more. Lowes and Home Depot can sell it, but they're pretty expensive.
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Old 07-21-2003, 09:02 AM
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Earl E..... Keep us posted with pics. Everyone is always looking for new ideas for a new garage or looking for ideas for an existing garage. One thing I would do if I were you and I've done it on my last two garages is build at least a 6' overhang on the front. Not only will you be able to keep your garage door open when it is raining it also gives you about 7' extra feet of dry space if you are doing something where you can't pull the vehicle all the way in. On mine it give me enough space to pull under when the weather is cold to keep the frost off of the windshield. You can't go wrong with an overhang. Get those pics posted. One other thing also...Do not put 2 single garage doors in. I put the standard 9' wide doors in and barely can get my car trailer in. 3" on each side clearance and a dually truck comes awful close to not fitting.

Kevin
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 07-21-2003, 03:53 PM
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I'll give the overhang some thought. I think it would be a good idea - if I can make it work with my space limitations on the lot.
I guess I could post a pic or two as it goes. I'll have to get my tech savvy son to show me how!
I'm planning on 4 - 10' wide doors, 8 foot high. That's a foot larger all around than standard. I'll have 2 bays to park in and stay clean, with a wall separating the workshop area of the garage. With 12' ceilings, I could park 4 (on two lifts), if I ever wanted to( and could afford it), and still have half the garage for the workshop.
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Old 07-21-2003, 06:31 PM
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Here's mine (built for the largest RV, which I don't own, but for resale).
Plenty of 110v outlets, flouresent lights, 220v outlets, phone, water, stereo, refrigerator, storage in attic and in loft above bathroom. This time I got stairs to the loft area so no more falling off ladders.
In the winter there is a commercial size furnace and in the summer, they ceiling fan and turbine fan move the air out the two bay doors. Build yourself a large workbench with low hung lighting over that.
The lift is what I consider a mandatory tool in any shop, especially if you have old tired knees. Mine is the SUPERIOR 7000# four post, but in hindsight I wish I had chosen a two post lift again for the versatility of a two post over the more convenient four post. The compressor is next in my priorities of importance...well, right behind the bathroom.
http://myweb.cableone.net/rottie3054/
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 07-21-2003, 08:14 PM
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Nice! The pictures help a lot. 5-7 ain't bad either. 5-5 post is on my build list. My 82 year old neighbor has a 37,000 mile 2 door post he plans to leave to family - I'm trying to get adopted. Can you be adopted over 50?
How deep is your RV bay?
Why would you prefer a 2 post lift? I can see where it would have somewhat better access to the mechanicals, but the drive-on ease of a 4 post seem appealing.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 07-22-2003, 07:42 AM
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You can download a demo version of 3D Floorplan,3D Home architect, or Punch Software. I have used all three and they are not hard to learn. I like Punch the best. These programs are great for visualization. If at all possible, you might want to consider building the garage seperate from the house. This will alow more freedom in your roof height and will also allow you to deal with less strict building codes. I have worked as a contractor for many years and in my experience, the building codes and permits are alot less strict than the ones for attached buildings. My number one thing with garages is depth. I like to have plenty of working space in the front and rear of the car when it is all the way in the garage with the doors shut.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 07-22-2003, 10:47 AM
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My RV side of the shop is approx. 46 feet deep x 22 feet wide. I preferred to have a deeper car bay than wider car bay so an RV would fit (for resale value). The walls are approx. 15 feet in height. The single car bay side is 26 feet deep x 20 feet wide with 10 foot walls. We placed the slab 1 foot below the top of the poured stem wall for additional height. The roof is peaked pretty steep for additional ceiling height. That gave me plenty of room in the loft storage area above the bathroom.
I prefer the two post lift for versatility mainly. You can remove tires/wheels for service w/o using a jack bridge as on my four post. There is more access to the undercarriage. You can leave the car on the two post lift to take weight off the suspension for extended periods of storage. A two post lift is generally capable of more weight than a four post. You can place longer vehicles on the two post lift than on a four post. The only real advantage to the four post in my opinion is the convenience of driving on to it and lifting the car w/o having to get down on the knees to adjust the arms.
I would strongly suggest that if a lift is in your future, start gathering brochures from companies now and study the vast differances in them. For very little additional money, a commercial grade lift is a better deal over a "hobby lift" if you plan to use it extensively (and you will). Your friends will also want to use it. Make sure that the company uses structural steel and has had their lifts tested by the independent testing facility (usually located in KS). My previous two post FORWARD MANUFACTURING lift was 9,000#. but it was a commercial grade lift and tested to twice that amount of weight. Most lifts only require 4" of aged concrete, but if you go to a commercial grade lift, use no less than 6-8" of steel reinforced concrete beneath the footprints of each vertical column. The vertical columns on my two post each weighed over 1,000# and I chose to have it delivered and installed by a distributor for just $300.00!
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2003, 03:47 PM
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Mr. Model,
If a metal building fits into your plans I highly recommend steelbuilding.com steelbuilding.com I just finished putting up a 40 x 50 this past week. The quality and factory support was pretty good. Only 1 piece of the frame was misfabricated and the fix was very easy. They also provided extra wall sheets, roof sheets, etc, in case you screw one up while cutting.
Think about it.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2003, 05:11 PM
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I envy you for having the opportunity to build a shop to your needs. I would encourage you to consider your lift needs first and then determine the height of your ceiling. I have a 10' 6" high ceiling and have a Stinger lift that I am extremely happy with. I can park my corvette on it and put it in the top lift position and still have 5" to spare. But that is a Corvette and not a tall S.U.V. or a truck or a street rod. If I put my '31 5 window on it I can only go half way up. That means using a creeper stool or hunching over, OUCH! You might check with a lift company and find out the height of the rails at the top position and then measure your tallest vehicle and let that determine your ceiling height. Better that then building a cut out later or crunching the ceiling with your vehicle. Good luck! Also don't skimp on the lift. A few hundred more initially will pay benefits later. My Stinger is SUPER!
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2003, 08:42 PM
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A few years back I moved to a new location and was forced to leave my 30x40 w/10'walls metal shop. I moved to a neighborhood where I did not have the room to put this size shop again. I built a wood shop, 24x30 w/8' walls. I hope to someday install another 20' on the end making it a 24x50. This time, the newly added walls will be 10' at least. I have a 2 post lift in my shop and am able to use it because of the cathedral trusses I used when I built it. I have an "I beam" running the 30' length of my building, so I had to order the symmetrical two post lift. I use this lift, which lifts the bottom of the frame to a 6' height, for my '40 Buick coupe, '01 300M Chrysler, and my 92 Silverado. It is a 9000lb lift and I ordered it off the 'net at Lifts.com for $2100 delivered to my door. I have no problems working with my vehicles in my shop, and have lifted several other vehicles. I had a bit of trouble with a '48 Chevy Suburban, it couldn't be lifted to the max because the back of the cab would have hit my ceiling. But anything other than a minivan or something with a long cab like that will work OK. I would prefer an extra two feet in height or be able to turn my lift the long way in the shop,(cant because of door location)either one of these suggestions would solve my height problem. I tend to agree with most everyone else, build as big as you can afford and have enough room for. There are several metal "kits" on the market if you have inclination to do it yourself. That's what I did the first time. It's not all that hard to do, just like an Erector Set and requires very few specialty tools. No cutting, no welding, all bolted and screwed together. Two guys can do it without too much trouble, especially if you have a tractor to help do a little lifting with. Hope this helps some, PACO
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 07-24-2003, 09:59 PM
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Lots of good information above. I built a 2000sq. ft with one side for a motorhome. Sold the motorhome and that is where the four poster lives today. You want enough head room for a lift.

My garage is 45'x'45. On the back wall I put a single car garage door. This provides a drive thru if needed. It provides excellent ventilation on hot days. Also, for ease of foot movement around the property it is nice.

Next, put in lots of electrical. The good news is I did. The bad news is while the outlets are about 3' above the ground, they have a tendency to be covered by a workbench, shelves, etc. I would raise to 4' or at least above bench level.

Lighting!!!! Because 1/2 of my garage has a 20'+ ceiling my lighting is poor at night. I've been considering those lights they use at Home depot and Costco.

While I live in some what rural area, I did need to get a variance when we built the house for the garage.

Space is good. More space is gooder. Good luck, r

Last edited by RAW; 07-24-2003 at 10:08 PM.
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