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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 07-24-2003, 10:14 PM
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RAW, my uncle put up some 5-6' lights (don't know the actual, but they are LONG!) right at head level along the walls of his shop. When we put them up, I thought it was going to be blinding at night when they are on, but they are actually perfect! Just a thought when you add some more lights...

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 07-24-2003, 10:52 PM
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GT2betubbed, I have some extra light fixtures and I thought about using them as you described but thought the shadows and brightness might be a problem. I only have one wall next to the lift but I'm going to give it a try. Thx for the encouragement, r
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 07-24-2003, 11:06 PM
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No prob, I think you'll be very pleased!
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2003, 08:16 AM
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I inherited a steel 36' x 30' shed with no floor. We put in concrete with a moisture barrier underneath and ran electrical to the shop. The shop has two sliding farm doors on the wide side, it opens up at least 15' across. This does wonders for lighting, ventilation, and moving stuff in and out. Also, when you put your roof on, put some of those translucent panels in that allow light to come down. It's like cheap skylights. We're still wiring up the shop, but during the day with the big doors open and the light coming through there, it's plenty bright to see to work. When you pour your floor, a neat trick is to slope the concrete towards the doors just a little bit. This really helps stuff run out of the shed, although it does make chasing fasteners a pain.

I forgot the other neat thing. The shed has 2x6 braces running the length of it at least 7 feet up in the air. We're building shelves up that high for extra storage, then hanging lights underneath them over a workbench. Since they're that far up in the air, you can make the shelves 4 feet wide without interfering with anything, as long as you don't mind a few support legs out that far.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2003, 08:58 AM
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I have now built and USED 2 shops and continue to learn about shop buildings. The first one was designed by a "great architect" and built of stuccoed block. Looked great from the outside and I used it for 12 years. It was 30x42 w/9ft. minimum ceiling height and with a 42x17 loft. Lots of storage but the whole first floor was wide open. The floors were level (caused a BIG issue with the fire guys). The major observation was that it took a lot of walking to get anything. The solution was to have multiple copies of tools located where they were used. The other issue was that dust anywhere went everywhere.

We retired and moved. Added 2400 sq ft to the house with a 30x40 3 car garage. This is used for our regular cars.

Built a detached shop that is 64x31 with a 24x12 L, 9'4" ceilings except the lift bay and level floors. The second floor is stick built not trusses so that it is used as storage. It has a floor that is supported by wooden I beams that are engineered to support the wood shop if I need to expand. One portion of the first floor extends into the second so that there is a 14' height over the lift.
That lift is a 9000# asymmetric Rotary with the extensions so that Vans and Pickups fit with ease.

I started by making a list of the equipment desired and features that were wanted. Then used "3D Home Architect" to do the design. The exterior looks much like the house but is shorter than the house (we have the height restriction).There is an office. a 24x24 wood shop separated by a plastic strip door for dust control (i do fiberglass in that area), machining area (Bridgeport mill and a big lathe), 30x14 wash/paint room with a drain and ventilation, welding area, 16x8 storage area. All heated and air conditioned. Compressor and dust collection are not in the main building. If you are going to paint air lines need to be over head to minimize condensation with appropriate drops and drains. 200 amp power and outlets everywhere. In the high area there are HID lights the rest of the shop has overhead switched outlets that have fluorescent fixtures in them. The welders can reach the whole shop and the apron outside. All walls are insulated so that I can heat or AC only the parts that I am using. Each area has the tools that are used in that area.

I hope this helps and I will share any other info that you need. When I started this thing I couldn't find much help. I found a lot of opinions but not many who had done it. Good luck.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2003, 08:04 PM
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Damn clangkam, That sounds like a dream shop. 64x31 and 30x40......I would have to hire someone to keep the floors swept.

Chris
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 07-27-2003, 08:28 AM
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i don't know if i mentioned before but if you decide to go taller use block below to make up the difference. you can either face the block with brick to match the house or you can use the split faced block that adds architectural style to the foundation. it is cheaper to have the block layed higher when having the foundation layed than it is to stick build it using longer studs. so say that you do go 12' just bring the foundation up 4' and stick build a standard 8' garage on top of that, then all you have to do is drop your door headers down to the standard height. if you build any closets inside the garage have a block footing layed around fot it also so you have to step up into the closet. with this you can completely wet the garage floor without fear of any water laying against the walls or wicking up the sill plate. as someone else stated run more outlets than you will ever need. it only cost for just the outlet, box, and outlet cover when running more. the wire has to be run anyways so adding an outlet is minimal. start now buying up outlets, boxes, switches, light fixtures, etc. while you are not in a hurry and usually this time of year (construction time) these items are on sale and can be bought for a very reasonable price. also plan that if yo have overhead cabinets to have soffits built down to the top of the cabinets. this will eliminate 90% of where dust settles. this should be a must if you plan to paint in the same area. dust can gather on top of a cabinet really thick in one days time. especially if you are in a rural area where you have fields and dirt. wind blows it and a garage with a door open creates a vacuum. i did state before to make plans for a bathroom whether you put one in now or not but you can have the plumbing run and stubbed just in case you want to add one in the future. nothing better than having a place to use without being super greasy and having to go thru the house. momma gets to screamin and yellin...shoes off, get off the carpet, don't touch anything, yadda yadda yadda. add one cable outlet on each wall for the tv. this way you won't have to re-run a cable when you decide you don't want it there. add places foe ceiling fans to circulate the air. it helps move the heat around in the winter and they create enough of a breeze even on low in the summertime that the damn pesky mosquitoes won't be bothering you if you are out there working in the evening with the doors open. ain't nothing worse than working under the hood with about a dozen mosquitoes after your blood. i think this is a thread jon should keep in the KB or somewhere so people having different ideas or pics could help out others on down the line.

kevin
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 07-27-2003, 09:11 AM
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There are alot of great ideas here. To me the most important one is the electrical outlets. I have built 2 garages for myself. I ran outlets atleast every 4', including the ceiling, in both of them. I bought the boxes, covers, and outlets when I found them on sale. Besides the safety and power loss, I hate using extension cords. I also run 200 amp service, telephone and cable out there. Since my power is run underground, it is just as easy to run the phone and cable in the same hole. I just add one more tube in the hole.

Just my opinion.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 07-28-2003, 06:50 AM
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Thanks for keeping the good ideas coming. I'll check into the idea of raising the foundation blocks for more headroom. I'm planning to go to NSRA Louisville this week - plan to check out some lifts while there.
On my last garage/shop I used 7/16"OSB to panel the walls.. Was a pain to install, but I could drive a srcew anywhere to mount shelves, etc. And I guess it helped insulate the garage. It never got colder or hotter than the average weekly temperature. For Nashville, that means it never froze anything in the 15 years I had it, and that it would stay pretty cool most of the day in the summer.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 08-02-2003, 07:11 AM
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Lifts

You have a lot of good advice on the shop. I have a 60 x 40 and it only took 3 years for it to get too small. :^)

I can recommend Eagle lifts from personal experience. I have their SS-7000, 4 post, 7000# lift. It is not anchored to the ground, and with the optional castor kit, you can move the lift with a car on it (get a helper to help guide it). I have moved it with my '70 Chrysler 300 on the lift, I think that is about as big and heavy as most cars. They are not the cheapest company around, but they do offer free delivery. My lift is used for both storage and service.

I used a floor jack and my engine lift and assembled it by myself.


http://www.eagleequip.com/products/l...ice/ss7000.htm
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2003, 09:28 AM
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This is my first post (or reply if you prefer) to the boards.
My shop is 48' X 60' with 16' walls. All steel construction from Miracle Truss MFG out of Indianapolis, IN. They are good folks to work with, and reasonable in price.
I built 2 stalls that go to the roof, (4 cars worth), and 3 that have 9' overhead clearance (6 cars worth). The upstairs area is for parts, storage, and social immenities (the livable "doghouse" part). Don't forget to make provisions for stairs! I made the mistake of having a 4/12 roof pitch put on it, this is a waste of space, and makes heating nearly impossible, not to mention the fact that I get to shovel extra snow every winter just to get in & out. A 2/12 pitch is plenty strong with this kind of construction, and have the runoff go to the rear if you can.
I installed a cinder block walled pit vs. a lift, and didn't consider the local watertable, so, heavy rains can produce an indoor pool (OOPS!), there are watersealing paints that wiil cure this problem tho. The pit has a small storage area off to one side for storage of grease guns, drain pans, oil filters, basicly what one needs when servicing a car from below. I plumbed it for air & electricity (use explosion proof stuff there, gasoline vapors seek the lowest levels). The pit is a bit unhandy when dropping a tranny or any 'heavy' work, but it is convenient for most other 'under car' tasks.
The other guys are right, you can't have enough electricity, lights, or air lines from the compressor. I'm now in the process of adding pushbuttons to open & close the doors from in the house too. This makes it much more convenient for those nights when you go in for a break, and stay. 3 way (or 4 way) light switches are handy too. Phone & Internet hook ups are a plus for getting info & calling for parts.
My best advice: If in doubt, add more when building, it may cost you extra, but it's a b**ch to add later! Good luck!
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2004, 05:58 PM
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I'm in the process of building a 24'x 36' detached shop on my property. Actually I can't believe I'm getting one!! I've fought with the wife for years about the "smells", the clutter, & the mess in the attached garage for years. Now with a new house and property big enough to handle a detached shop ...well it'll be HEAVEN on earth for me! AND NOT WOMEN ALLOWED!!! *L* At this point I have the foundation poured & wall framing up (working on roof trusses now). I plan to have 220/50amp outlets, got it plumbed for a toilet , a sink, also a phone line, and I have a 1/2 gas line layed in. AND I'm doing this all my self! I only have 8 ft. walls though, but with the RV pad in front I can deal with anything higher out there. I got the plans and the lumber as a "pre-engineered kit" from Lumber 84 ...local lumber store. I looked on the Internet for "kit" garages and was surprise at what was available ...at a very reliable price too! I would suggest for anybody interested to look there for ideas. My "happy" story!!! ...Mark
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2006, 11:16 PM
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Last edited by 1ownerT; 12-30-2006 at 07:02 AM.
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2006, 05:47 PM
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Earl E.
I am sorda anxious for you to start your shop. I love to see where all these fellows work on these projects. I too want a shop so bad. I need one. I hope all these guys will post pics of their shops/ work areas. Along with organizing tips and little tricks to make life a little easier. I saw a shop on here a long time ago, he had a toy train set up in his, and the track was on hinges, raised up for more room, if I aint mistaken I think he was a Pontiac nut. I had a few fellows on here lead me to a few places and a few shops, but could have swore there were more on here. You got a few good tips so far, but the biggest thing I would do 1st is the codes of where you live. I am in construction and these dudes can just make it impossible to make anything go easily for you. I wish you luck on your shop. Hope you can get started on it soon. Please keep us posted.

Glxy500
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2006, 06:21 PM
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Sounds like clangkam is/used to be a machinist. Organization is a must, some good tips there.
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