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Old 05-01-2009, 10:54 PM
72 grabber 51F-1 65 chevystang
 
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business idea

I have an idea for a business and wanted to know your opinion. The idea is to clean out houses, garages and remove yard debris. There is a company that does this in hoover which is the wealthy section. They use a Isuzu truck with a 8x10x5 bed. The minumun charge for coming out is $100 and a full load costs $498. I figure I can do it around here for about 1/2 there price and make money. They do not run in my area. My dad has an F-350 flatbed that I will be using. Any appliances or metal would be saved up until I got a good load and took to the scrapyard. Any furniture or clothes that I got that was decent I would have a yard sale and try and sale the stuff real cheap. What didn't sale would be donated to goodwill or hauled to the dump. I think it is a decent way to make money, just looking for opinions

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Old 05-01-2009, 11:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old fords
I have an idea for a business and wanted to know your opinion. The idea is to clean out houses, garages and remove yard debris. There is a company that does this in hoover which is the wealthy section. They use a Isuzu truck with a 8x10x5 bed. The minumun charge for coming out is $100 and a full load costs $498. I figure I can do it around here for about 1/2 there price and make money. They do not run in my area. My dad has an F-350 flatbed that I will be using. Any appliances or metal would be saved up until I got a good load and took to the scrapyard. Any furniture or clothes that I got that was decent I would have a yard sale and try and sale the stuff real cheap. What didn't sale would be donated to goodwill or hauled to the dump. I think it is a decent way to make money, just looking for opinions


Not to sound hard on you or your ideas, but two things jump right out at me.


1.Liability issues. More so from a customer's viewpoint. I'm guessing you may encounter customers who think along these lines: "How do I know you won't steal something while here? Are you casing the joint for a future theft?" To ease those kinds of thoughts in their minds, Can you be licensed and bonded to do this? Do you need to be? Insurance for a business can get spendy in a hurry too.

2. As a former lawncare side business operator (think similar small business to startup), I'll tell you this. You will run into people who expect first rate service, but will only pay nickels on the dollar for the work. And a tightening economy only makes it worse.

I'm reminded of what one customer told me point blank after doing a quick "look see" over my equipment. "How dare you show up at my property with that junk". Some people in wealthier areas seem to think everybody can wipe their own tails with $100 bills, and so believe that everyone should drive a new truck and have new equipment (you will need some equipment for that type of business too). I actually had one customer belittle my truck (Heaven forbid it wasn't driven off the lot that morning...), my mower (washed and waxed that morning but it wasn't a "good enough mower"), and myself personally (I wasn't mowing her lawn in dress slacks and loafers.... ). As is what happens anywhere else in life, you will see the best and worst in people the more you get out and meet them. And I've met a few at their worst in that situation.


In a while, Chet.
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Old 05-01-2009, 11:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schnitz
Not to sound hard on you or your ideas, but two things jump right out at me.


1.Liability issues. More so from a customer's viewpoint. I'm guessing you may encounter customers who think along these lines: "How do I know you won't steal something while here? Are you casing the joint for a future theft?" To ease those kinds of thoughts in their minds, Can you be licensed and bonded to do this? Do you need to be? Insurance for a business can get spendy in a hurry too.

2. As a former lawncare side business operator (think similar small business to startup), I'll tell you this. You will run into people who expect first rate service, but will only pay nickels on the dollar for the work. And a tightening economy only makes it worse.

I'm reminded of what one customer told me point blank after doing a quick "look see" over my equipment. "How dare you show up at my property with that junk". Some people in wealthier areas seem to think everybody can wipe their own tails with $100 bills, and so believe that everyone should drive a new truck and have new equipment (you will need some equipment for that type of business too). I actually had one customer belittle my truck (Heaven forbid it wasn't driven off the lot that morning...), my mower (washed and waxed that morning but it wasn't a "good enough mower"), and myself personally (I wasn't mowing her lawn in dress slacks and loafers.... ). As is what happens anywhere else in life, you will see the best and worst in people the more you get out and meet them. And I've met a few at their worst in that situation.


In a while, Chet.
I understand what you're saying. As far as theft I would prefer the owners to be there. I've never stole anything in my life and don't plan to.
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Old 05-02-2009, 09:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old fords
I understand what you're saying. As far as theft I would prefer the owners to be there. I've never stole anything in my life and don't plan to.

Never even stole a kiss from the cute girl down the street? Dude, you need some serious help!


Yes, I see what you are saying, but some people will still try to pass that "one item that's missing" off as being something "that cleaning guy took", no matter the level of your integrity.


In a while, Chet.
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Old 05-03-2009, 06:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schnitz
Not to sound hard on you or your ideas, but two things jump right out at me.


1.Liability issues. More so from a customer's viewpoint. I'm guessing you may encounter customers who think along these lines: "How do I know you won't steal something while here? Are you casing the joint for a future theft?" To ease those kinds of thoughts in their minds, Can you be licensed and bonded to do this? Do you need to be? Insurance for a business can get spendy in a hurry too.

2. As a former lawncare side business operator (think similar small business to startup), I'll tell you this. You will run into people who expect first rate service, but will only pay nickels on the dollar for the work. And a tightening economy only makes it worse.

I'm reminded of what one customer told me point blank after doing a quick "look see" over my equipment. "How dare you show up at my property with that junk". Some people in wealthier areas seem to think everybody can wipe their own tails with $100 bills, and so believe that everyone should drive a new truck and have new equipment (you will need some equipment for that type of business too). I actually had one customer belittle my truck (Heaven forbid it wasn't driven off the lot that morning...), my mower (washed and waxed that morning but it wasn't a "good enough mower"), and myself personally (I wasn't mowing her lawn in dress slacks and loafers.... ). As is what happens anywhere else in life, you will see the best and worst in people the more you get out and meet them. And I've met a few at their worst in that situation.


In a while, Chet.
Some have a image to uphold, you show up in a beater, the rest of neighbors may think their neighbor is strapped for cash.
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Old 05-03-2009, 07:13 AM
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Hi, interesting thread here,we run a cleaning business here in the Emerald isle and what we have found is that if you have a new truck/van then customers assume you are going to be too costly [you are doing too well] and however
fairly you price the job . these customers will want to pay you less much less. If you have an old truck/van then it may upset the customers image with their neighbours, same as mentioned in posting above .Insurance is a must have and is expensive, you will definitely break the odd item especially if you employ others or have a helpers. and ive heard stastictics that say a happy customer tells two people and an unhappy customer tells everyone who will listen!
One other item is rubbish disposal, it has become a very expensive operation and we have to satisfy a lot of EPA regulations so check out your local requirements.
I would say just do it ,you never know here it may lead to unless you try it,
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Old 05-03-2009, 04:17 PM
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ive mulled over this as well but everyone and their dog is doing this and has been increasingly so over the past few years as the world has gone to crap as it has. and also now scrap prices are crap again as well. the good time to do something like this has passed already.

mowing and yard work used to be a hot ticket but again everyones doing it and good luck scoring any properties now with all the competition now.

because everyone else is also out of work and having to resort to anything such as this.

its not good at all
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Old 05-03-2009, 05:03 PM
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OK Go to college and get a degree. Your chances of success increase dramatically with a degree. Notice, I did not say that success was guaranteed. I know that there will be 10 posts of whiners complaining about how their degree has done them no good whatsoever. (Under water basket weaving is the first to go in hard times.)

Now, assuming you are still reading, even though you have no intention of going to college, Plan B.

Just as a degree does not guarantee success, not having one does not guarantee failure. One of the largest businesses in the town I lived in before T-town started with one guy and a wheelbarrow doing just what you are thinking of doing.

How do you know you can make money and do it for 1/2? Have you figured all your costs and determined if there is a need for your services in the area you intend to work?

Call your insurance agent. Most insurance companies treat vehicle insurance differently if you are using the vehicle for business. If your agent is any good, he or she can probably point you in the right direction as to how to obtain a DBA or incorporate. And tell you the advantages and disadvantages of both.

Remember to keep a log book and save all your receipts. Not only do the expenses come out of your pocket day to day, they count against your income from the business when you file taxes.

If it were easy, everyone would be doing it. If you really want to go into business for yourself, and, after putting pencil to paper you feel you have a good chance of success, go for it. If the numbers don't add up, look for what people need that you can supply. That is the key to success, helping people get what they want and/or need.

There are a lot of people out there bad mouthing capitalism (some are on this board - we'll hear from them shortly). But capitalism can be broken down to this simple example:

You see a guy buying an apple for a dime from an apple vendor with a cart on a busy corner. What just happened? Simple. The guy selling the apple values the ten cents more than he values the apple. The guy buying the apple values the apple more than he values the ten cents. Both guys get what they want. Add free enterprise so there can be competition, which controls prices, and you have a healthy economy.

Get out there and start a business.
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Old 05-03-2009, 06:27 PM
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i dunno

go out and have a go,i have worked for myself for 18 years, asked a few guys i dealt with if they would support my new company, they all said they would, and did,all been good except for 1 hiccup.
You WILL regret it if you dont!
As for a the ute/truck, when i started out i bought a brand new 4x4 but to stop customers thinking i was doing too well, told everyone my vehicle was leased.My 2 guys i look up to the most both tell me,you have to look to be successful.That is why i always drive a late model nice vehicle.My work truck is a sept 2008 toyota hilux sr5 double cab diesel.A very nice vehicle!!
Russ
Later gator
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