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Old 05-02-2008, 06:43 AM
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Thanks for the help!
Im not really concerned with looking 100% factory and I'm ok with the fact that people will be able to tell I replaced the floors.
Dont get me wrong I'm not trying to rush through this or anything I just want to have fun and be safe while doing it.

There are a lot of spots where I can leave a little overlap 1/4" or so which I think will help me getting it ligned up.
I just dont want it to rust out on me down the road, spent WAY too much time fixing rot on this car.

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Old 05-02-2008, 08:11 AM
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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
 
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This is one thing I disagree with, the 1/4" overlap. My thoughts are, why leave an overlap that is smaller than original, just for the sake of making it smaller?

If you overlap it a half inch, and make it "look" original, there are many people who wouldn't even know you patched it! If it "looks" like it came from the factory that way, I feel that is second best to butt welding and metal finishing it to look EXACTLY as it did before. Which I would do, IF it were a super valuable or special car like a big block convertible or something like that.

But if you look around that floor, look at how the panels are held in, then do your "patch" the same way, make it look OEM.

Brian
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:03 PM
F&J F&J is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
This is one thing I disagree with, the 1/4" overlap. My thoughts are, why leave an overlap that is smaller than original, just for the sake of making it smaller?

If you overlap it a half inch, and make it "look" original, there are many people who wouldn't even know you patched it! If it "looks" like it came from the factory that way, I feel that is second best to butt welding and metal finishing it to look EXACTLY as it did before. Which I would do, IF it were a super valuable or special car like a big block convertible or something like that.

But if you look around that floor, look at how the panels are held in, then do your "patch" the same way, make it look OEM.

Brian
The main reason I go with small laps: The repro pans seem to have wrong angles on the sides. As I am gradually trimming the old floor back and test fitting, it seems to fit better with less lap because the 2 different angles will lay together better for welding & positioning. 2nd reason is that when I am done welding the edge of the new pan to the old floor, that small lap is easier to dolly to a flat fit under the car. It actually lays flatter and looks better IMO. If I was using a punch tool and plug welding instead, I would do a wider lap.

Also, on a floor, we are putting a seam where GM never had one, so no sense in using a step flanger to replicate?? Besides, a step flanger does not like all those curves and angles.
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:09 PM
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One important thing in doing these pans is to accurately plot out the depths of the F&R footwells, and the height & location of the seat riser and mounting holes. It is REAL easy to get the floors way too low as you are retrimming to get a good fit to the existing remains of the floor areas.

I put numbered marks along the top of the tunnel and the 2 door sills. Then use a straight edge across each mark and measure down to important features and make a good sketch. (before removing old floors) In a perfect world, the measurements would all come out correct with the new pan, but due to the differences in stampings, a compromise is likely on some measurements.
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Old 05-04-2008, 01:47 AM
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i would agree with what many have had to say there are alot of different ways to do it depending on what you have. the way i would probly do it (depending on what the pan or panel looks like is trim it so that you have about 1/4 to 1/2 in over lap. then take your flanging tool and put a crease around the old metal witch will allow the new pan to sit down flush with the older metal and will also give you more strangth and be more rigid. grind it clean and use some weld through copper primer or whatever you like. weld it it (DO NOT WELD LONG STROKES AT A TIME) and move around the panel so that the heat is not all in one area. once thats done you can grind your welds it will look nice. prime then seam seal making sure its pushed into any voids and paint. put your foot in the gas like you stole it and dont worry about kicking the floor out.
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