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-   -   cam degree (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/cam-degree-183612.html)

zoomo 08-30-2010 09:20 PM

cam degree
 
Alright so still one the same engine. 350 stock rebuilt, 60 cc double hump heads with 202 160 valves. comp cams 268 cam. Im wondering if i will need to degree the came to get my best performance in this application. And if so does anyone know exactly how much or a good way of doing it? thanks as always

DoubleVision 08-31-2010 05:02 AM

If I were doing a build for a street machine, I wouldn`t waste my time degreeing it.
If I were racing and racing only for cash, I`d degree it.

Blownchevelle68 08-31-2010 05:54 AM

I've degreed the last 2 engines I have built. All the specs have been spot on (Lunati cams) and the first time was kinda challenging, getting it right, but this last engine was easy.

I'd say it never hurts to do it. If anything, its a good learning experience.

zoomo 08-31-2010 06:34 AM

So from what im reading you basically just want the number one cylinder intake vaqlve all the way open when number one is at tdc?

Blownchevelle68 08-31-2010 06:44 AM

Your basically verifying that the cam is installed to manufactures spec and that specs are correct....Here is a good article

http://www.carcraft.com/howto/116_07...tool_list.html

techinspector1 08-31-2010 12:08 PM

Here's a pretty good tutorial from Ed Iskenderian that I refer to often...
http://www.iskycams.com/camshaft.php

engineczar 08-31-2010 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zoomo
So from what im reading you basically just want the number one cylinder intake vaqlve all the way open when number one is at tdc?

No

You have to look at the cam card that was supplied with the cam or go to the Comp website and plug in the grind number to get the correct numbers.

That cam will probably have a setup with the intake fully open at about 106 degrees ATDC.

hvy barrel 08-31-2010 07:35 PM

I have not degreed one that was dead on yet. I now degree every cam i install now.

hvy barrel 08-31-2010 07:50 PM

I have not degreed one that was dead on yet. I now degree every cam i install now.

Duntov 08-31-2010 08:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hvy barrel
I have not degreed one that was dead on yet. I now degree every cam i install now.

Me neither :mad:
http://www.iskycams.com/techtips.php

zoomo 09-01-2010 07:47 PM

So im completely confused by all this and it appears i have none of the tools required to do it. Am i really going to be causing problems by just installing it by using the marks on the timing gears?

speedfreak2 09-01-2010 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zoomo
So im completely confused by all this and it appears i have none of the tools required to do it. Am i really going to be causing problems by just installing it by using the marks on the timing gears?

The chances that you will run into a problem by not degreeing the cam are far greater today that they were maybe ten years ago, IMO. The problem that I have been running into is poor quality control on the timing gears. They can be out by +/- ten degrees - which is a problem that I had on the last engine that I built. The cam and timing chain/gears were from Comp Cams (I'm definitely not slamming Comp Cams but just pointing out that this was not a no name brand cheapo deal). Take the time to either have someone degree the cam for you or have someone help you do it but make sure it gets done. If you want I can tell you the experience that I just had and then you'd really understand but I don't want to write a book at this time.

EDIT: I don't know how to attach different threads on here but search for this thread and it will explain why you should degree in your camshaft:
"degreeing cam, worth it??"

Sorry but I need to edit again...I think this link will work for you: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/degr...th-178347.html

SSedan64 09-02-2010 08:33 AM

I haven't looked but, there're probably Vids on Youtube about degreeing Cams. That's how I learned, a buddy had a VHS tape.
Or they this >> http://www.speedwaymotors.com/DVD-Co...haft,9870.html

hvy barrel 09-02-2010 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zoomo
So im completely confused by all this and it appears i have none of the tools required to do it. Am i really going to be causing problems by just installing it by using the marks on the timing gears?

Engine building is one endeavor that will truely give you a great appreciation for the old saying "Ignorance is bliss". Many engines have been built with no thought given to degreeing a cam. The person doing this has a good chance of being completely satisfied with the outcome of their project whether they degree their cam or not.
There are so many individual parts individual parts involved in an engine assembly. All of these parts are cast or machined by so many different sources that all will be assembled into one engine. Any time a part is made there are specs with a tolerance range that they fall into. This leads to a condition called tolerance stacking. All of these tolerances can stack up or cancel each other out.
The purpose of all these engine assembly techniques, like degreeing a cam, are performed to help eliminate these tolerances & assure that all of the parts you have spent your hard earned money on are working the best they can, in your particular project.
There are some good books out there. One of the first ones I would suggest is the "The step by step guide to engine blue printing". give it a read & see if it helps with this or future engine projects.

techinspector1 09-02-2010 05:55 PM

Here's the book. You can buy it used for less than 12 bucks. I buy used books all the time. Good way to save a few sheckels.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The.../9781884089268


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