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Old 02-21-2006, 08:32 PM
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Circular saw to cut frames???

I heard a friend say that he used a circular saw with a metal cutting blade to cut his frame. Any truth to this?

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Old 02-21-2006, 08:48 PM
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Sure, you can get fiber blades for both metal and masonary, kind of like a cut-off wheel for a grinder but designed for a saw. I don't know how well they would work on something like a frame.
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Old 02-21-2006, 08:59 PM
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I cut frames all the time with a air cut off tool. Its a Cambell Hausfield I got at Wall Mart for about 25 bucks. It uses abrasive wheels. It works good, its a little slow and uses a lot of wheels but it will cut frames and is easy to control etc.
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Old 02-21-2006, 09:12 PM
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Henry, He has me wondering about how well that saw would work on something like a frame seems like it would be kind of awkward but maybe it might work pretty good. I have used these things to cut rod and small angle iron but I mostly keep one around to cut hydraulic hose, works really good for that. The blades can be found at most any hardware and I think they can even be found at Wal-Mart. Might be worth a try if there is no other method handy
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Old 02-21-2006, 09:39 PM
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Circular saw to cut frames???

You can buy metal cutting blades for a circular saw that are made of the same material as the blades for a chop saw. Because they are smaller and your circular saw is probably not as powerful as a big chop saw the blades will wear quickly and the cutting will be slow but it will get the job done.
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Old 02-21-2006, 11:10 PM
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It can be done I suppose but I think accuracy would be a real problem. Also blade depth. A circular saw with a 7 1/4" blade is only going to have about 2 1/2" of cutting depth - which means you COULD make it through 2x4 rectangular tubing. But after a couple of cuts, that composite blade is going to wear down to the point it will no longer make it through both sides of the tube at once, so you'd have to replace blades quite often.

Frame building usually requires quite a few angle cuts and these would be quite difficult with a circular saw. You would have to follow a drawn line or else create some sort of guide plate to make your angles correct. Of you've ever Z'ed a frame, you know the importance of accuracy in your angles. This also becomes a real safety issue in terms of getting good welds for the structural integrity of your chassis.

A much better, and not too costly solution, is a metal chop saw. These have a 14" blade, the blade makes perfect 90 degree cuts from top to bottom, and an angle cutting guide plate is built in. My roadster frame (click my Project journal to see details) was cut almost exclusively using a chop saw.

I would not, however, recommend trying to put a metal cutting blade in a miter saw. These might LOOK like a chop saw but they are made for cutting wood. They do not stand up well to the heat, force, and vibration created when cutting metal.
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Old 02-22-2006, 10:06 AM
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I have the DeWalt 14" Metal chop saw (with the Factory Carbide Blade), and it does a great job of cutting-no burrs, no abrasive dust everywhere, no sparks. I would not use a Metal Blade in a regular chop saw-they turn too fast and don't have enough motor.

At work we have a Circular saw type Metal Cutting saw (Hitachi) with the Carbide blade on it, and it does pretty well-we have used it to shorten a couple of Freightliner Frames (which are pretty thick), and it cut right through them without burrs-the down side is cost-they are around $200-250-
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Old 02-22-2006, 12:12 PM
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Thanks for your input guys. The idea of using a tool designed to cut wood, to cut steel seemed rather strange to me. But then again, how many of us have used a claw hammer instead of a ball-peen hammer. Hey, you can teach an old dog new tricks.
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Old 02-22-2006, 02:16 PM
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Hold on a sec...

A friend of mine has a circular saw DESIGNED to cut metal. Yep. Metal. He cut 12" Channel like it was 2x12 douglas fir. i was seriously impressed. Carbide blade, motor turns slower than its wood counterpart. Cut through fast, clean, and accurate. I'm looking for one, myself!
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Old 02-22-2006, 04:20 PM
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Milwaukee makes one that uses a 8" blade. Not cheap though at around $250-300
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Old 02-22-2006, 05:30 PM
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Check this out
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...temnumber=8897
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Old 02-22-2006, 05:55 PM
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circular saw with regular wood blade turned backwards, works good on sheet steel, thinwall tubing shouldn't be too much diffrent.
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Old 02-22-2006, 08:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 35WINDOW
I have the DeWalt 14" Metal chop saw (with the Factory Carbide Blade), and it does a great job of cutting-no burrs, no abrasive dust everywhere, no sparks. I would not use a Metal Blade in a regular chop saw-they turn too fast and don't have enough motor.
is this a wet saw or dry saw?

i saw one of the hand held ones at a local airgas tent sale that cut through 1" square stock. guy said it had a 10 amp motor, but geared. it was nice and even had a metal collection chamber to collect the scrap metal. carbide blade, i think just the blade was $80 and the saw with the blade new was close to $300. super clean cuts though.. and no fiberdisc material all over hte place.
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Old 02-23-2006, 08:07 AM
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If you use a circular saw blade turned backwards, it WILL cut sheet metal or roofing "tin". But let me tell you, it makes one hell of a racket! Also be careful using carbide tipped blades -- the tips can come off.

I have a heavy duty Rockwell contractor's circular saw -- one of the most powerful you can buy. I've used it to cut sheet siding steel, about 18 gauge, with an abrasive blade. Went though it like hot butter, but the blade wore fast! Go slow and don't force it -- light pressure. Takes a bit of time, but doesn't eat the blade up so fast. A circular saw is great for straight cuts, especially if you can clamp a piece of 1x4 on the frame rail to use as a guide.
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Old 02-23-2006, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvsapp
is this a wet saw or dry saw?

i saw one of the hand held ones at a local airgas tent sale that cut through 1" square stock. guy said it had a 10 amp motor, but geared. it was nice and even had a metal collection chamber to collect the scrap metal. carbide blade, i think just the blade was $80 and the saw with the blade new was close to $300. super clean cuts though.. and no fiberdisc material all over hte place.
It is a dry saw, with a Carbide type Blade-they say you can get about 600 cuts out of it (I still haven't had to resharpen it yet)-

Here's the linkhope it works)

http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/to...?productID=159
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