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-   -   ClearCoat question (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/clearcoat-question-221289.html)

Jimbo17 07-04-2012 06:20 AM

ClearCoat question
 
About four years ago I had my van painted.

It is a base coat clear coat and the problem is on the roof area only the clear coat is lifting.

The base coat looks fine. Can I sand all the clear coat off and prep the roof again and shot it or is this asking for trouble?

I used a Matrix paint at the time not sure if this matters or not.

If I was going to sand just the roof area should I use a 320 or something like a 400 to prep it?

Thanks for your help. Jimbo

swvalcon 07-04-2012 07:07 AM

You will have to sand the roof down with 320 then recoat with a coat of color then reclear. you can't just reclear what you have.

deadbodyman 07-04-2012 07:35 AM

Just being curious but what kind of clear did you use and how many coats?

mitmaks 07-04-2012 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swvalcon (Post 1570768)
You will have to sand the roof down with 320 then recoat with a coat of color then reclear. you can't just reclear what you have.

Whoa, hold on there. 320 is way too coarse, unless you're going to do some priming/bodywork. I'd wetsand with 600 and shoot 1-2 coats of color and re-clear.
p.s. Might have to seal it to prevent lifting and have better base coat adhesion.

swvalcon 07-04-2012 02:13 PM

The only time I sand with 600 or finer is if all i'm doing is blending a panel and reclearing. Other wise I always go 320-400 if its going to get 2-3 coats of color and 2-3 coats of clear. If done this way you shouldn't see any sand marks. Thats why so many guys jobs end up peeling their afaird to rough up the old paint a little.

mitmaks 07-04-2012 02:18 PM

You might get away with 320 under solid colors but for metallic I wouldn't use anything coarser than 600.
As far as paint job delaminating-some people wait too long before topcoating/clearing.

TucsonJay 07-04-2012 04:05 PM

I use 360 under any base coats. for clear coats I use 600 minimum. I would rather "ere on the side of caution", and always have good adhesion, so I always use a little rougher grit than the industry favors.

Something is working, since I haven't had paint peel on a job in a few decades. :-)

mitmaks 07-04-2012 04:37 PM

I've seen too many "dealer lot" paint jobs with sandscratches in them. A coat of epoxy as a sealer is better than 320 grit sandscratches showing up imo

Jimbo17 07-04-2012 05:47 PM

Sanding
 
One thing to remember is this is the roof area of a van that I am doing so maybe sanding with 320 and then I want to prime it and use a sealer before spraying a few coats of base and then the clear.

Should I use a 320 and wet sand the whole area or can I use 320 on a DA?

Is there such a thing as a primer/sealer or are they two separate steps?

Thanks Jimbo

swvalcon 07-04-2012 06:24 PM

I would use 400 on a da. 320 dry or 400wet. Then use a 2-k sealer or a coat of epoxy. Then put down a good coat of base giving each coat time to set up between coats. There nothing worse than rushing your base coats.I always give mine at least a half hour to 45 min. I'am a restoration shop so I dont have a high paid ex detail guy wineing about how much time I take. I wait 2-4hrs and put on the clear giving it about a hour between coats.

deadbodyman 07-05-2012 05:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitmaks (Post 1570867)
You might get away with 320 under solid colors but for metallic I wouldn't use anything coarser than 600.
As far as paint job delaminating-some people wait too long before topcoating/clearing.

I do it every day...320 DA ,2-3 coats of base then clear..I've never seen anybody sand a car with 600 .....even If I'm blending I'll 320 da where the color is then 600 DA the blend area and the rest of the panel....I never use a sealer just a few coats of base on the primer spots before I start painting....Thats what I've used for my production work for the past 20 yrs..If your getting scratches showing through with 320 DA your not getting enough paint on, 2-3 coats of any base is plenty ...
Now,hand sanding and wet sanding is different. When wet or dry sanding the coarsest you can use would be 400 before you can paint....The only time I use any kind of sealer is when I'm doing a complete paint job thats been completely primed and blocked(by hand) and then its an epoxy primer reduced to a paints viscosity..

tech69 07-06-2012 09:50 AM

I wouldn't do a 320 on a light silver but I haven't seen any issues from using a 320 and I know quite a few guys who use it. The only time where I saw procedural issues in regards was a guy who used 220 on his primer then sealed it with a 2k mixed a tad thick. Soon as the sun hit it the thing shrunk and revealed huge scratches. It was a silver car. In our shop in the body area we block with 320 dry then it goes to the paint area and the painter uses a scuff pad with a piece of 600 da paper on top and goes over it real quickly but not guide coated or anything. Just kind of buffers out our scratches a bit. I think if there was a problem with 320 scratches it would have some to do with the color and/or sealer pinching up as it cures.

swvalcon 07-06-2012 10:47 AM

I've seen sand swelling on 320 if you load up your base coats giving the solvets time to bite into the primer. Just give your base time to completely flash off between coats and you wont have any issues. I've even used 220 on a soild single stage used car job and been ok.

mitmaks 07-06-2012 10:49 AM

Like usual, you ask 10 painters how they paint and you'll get 10 different results. It's really up to the painter to decide what he prefers. It mostly comes from experience, none of us became great painters overnight. We all learned from our successes and mistakes.

cyclopsblown34 07-06-2012 12:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitmaks (Post 1571360)
Like usual, you ask 10 painters how they paint and you'll get 10 different results. It's really up to the painter to decide what he prefers. It mostly comes from experience, none of us became great painters overnight. We all learned from our successes and mistakes.

Speak for yourself...I'm still a rank amateur. I learned the other day from my friend who messed up the hood for my son's truck that you can spray activator directly on sun dried non activated clear and it'll work perfect, I also found out you sand previous clear to 1000 grit and reclear. Needless to say, I'll let him do airbrush work(he's an awesome artist) with materials I mix up and I'll spray the clear.


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