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Old 02-17-2017, 07:33 AM
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ClutchTamer in a '69 Camaro

I'm making some changes to my '69 Camaro. I'm upgrading the transmission and clutch, along with a cam change, pistons and drive shaft. In another thread some people suggested that I might want to try the ClutchTamer with this new dual disc clutch to prevent it from breaking parts. I was wondering if anyone here had used one of these and if they had installed one in a '69 Camaro. I'm wondering how it would mount in this car and if it would fit behind the dash without modifying it. I've got a pretty nice dash and I don't want to do any more cutting on it. Below are my new McLeod RXT clutch and the dash in my car.
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Old 02-18-2017, 11:18 AM
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Obviously in-dash installs can be more aesthetically pleasing, but not everyone wants to cut up their dash. Here's an example of an early Camaro that used the universal underdash version of the ClutchTamer, quick and easy to remove when you want to return to stock...



I also have a stealth version that looks a little like a clutch switch when installed. The 3/4" dia threaded body is used to adjust the clutch's initial hit, a rotating dial on the left end adjusts the delay rate. Not as convenient to dial in, but basically hidden and no need for a pedal stop...



My car isn't a Camaro, but it's an example of an in-dash install using a bar style knob...



More than a few underdash installs have had hood release handles installed
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Old 02-18-2017, 01:00 PM
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The universal underdash version started out as kind of a gateway thing- easy to install for someone that doesn't want to commit to something permanent, but can later be converted to thru dash with a rectangular hole on dash assy's that have enough space.

An offset pedal bracket is also an option to move it farther away from your leg. The FOX Mustang specific underdash version features 2" offset from the pedal, sitting the cylinder/dash bracket alongside their hood release. The offset pedal brackets cause no problems at all, lots of quick NMRA Coyote Stock cars use them.
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Old 02-18-2017, 01:13 PM
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Does the stealth version work as well as the full size after it's dialed in?
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Old 02-18-2017, 02:56 PM
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It works very well, just generally much more difficult to access. Mounting the Stealth to control the pedal is probably easiest depending on application, but it can also be mounted for control at the clutch fork. For that you would likely have to crawl under the car to change a setting.

For something like a street/strip car that occasionally uses nitrous, easy access is really nice to have. A setting aggressive enough to hold a nitrous hit will cause a big bog when launching NA. Also if you go to no-prep races, it's nice to be able to dial things back to work with a lower rpm launch and less power.
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:34 PM
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My car is just a street car that I'm taking to the track this summer for fun. I don't want to break anything, and what you said about the clutch I'm using makes a lot of sense. I'm afraid that this clutch is going to hit too hard and break parts or cause the tires to spin. It's a 427, 4 speed, 4.11 9 inch with 31/18.5/15 Hoosier street radials.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:07 PM
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Interesting set ups
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Old 02-20-2017, 07:39 AM
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Im really digging this
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Old 02-20-2017, 07:52 AM
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I didn't see any pricing or other information on the stealth kit on the ClutchTamer web sight.
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Old 02-22-2017, 06:48 PM
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How far from the clutch pedal pivot point should the stealth tamer be mounted?

Can you give me some dimensions on the universal kit so I can see if it will fit under my dash? I'll try to see how much room I have tomorrow and then get one of these coming so I can get it mounted. Right now the engine is out and being disassembled, the transmission is on the bench and the pinion is out of the rear end. Might as well take something apart inside the car too.

I was wondering how much heat would effect the consistency of the clutch tamer. I know that normal brakes fade when they get hot, and carbon brakes get better when they are hot. I didn't know how much different the clutch would react when it's hot or cold. Have you had much experience with the clutch that I'm using?
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Old 02-22-2017, 07:49 PM
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Without trying to sound too ignorant, what exactly is the purpose of a 'clutch tamer'? Don't you want the clutch to hit hard? I understand that a hard hitting clutch makes it tough to drink your cup of Dunkachino in traffic, but your car doesn't look like a car that you're stopping for a fast food drink in. Is it a way of building some clutch slippage into your clutch operating system?

But I'll admit that I'm in for the discussion
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Old 02-22-2017, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 64nailhead View Post
Without trying to sound too ignorant, what exactly is the purpose of a 'clutch tamer'? Don't you want the clutch to hit hard? I understand that a hard hitting clutch makes it tough to drink your cup of Dunkachino in traffic, but your car doesn't look like a car that you're stopping for a fast food drink in. Is it a way of building some clutch slippage into your clutch operating system?

But I'll admit that I'm in for the discussion
It's exactly what I hi-lighted. You get a very similar effect to the McCleod Sof-Lok clutch set-up used for racing, but instead of a metallic faced disc and the adjustment being all contained in the pressure plate assemble, the ClutchTamer gets you a similar result using any clutch package you might choose to use.

A "gorilla grip" clutch may seem like the ideal, but once you get off plain street tires and onto some stickier rubber or prepped pavement the tires are no longer the fuse that prevents blowing up driveshafts, u-joints, axles, ring & pinions, wheel studs and transmission shafts and gears.

I gave up on racing 4-speeds 25 years ago....because the cost of the $1400 McCleod clutch and/or the $$$ Jericho transmission was just too much when a full tilt racing TH-400 and Race converter were only $775 at that time.
I blew up several driveshafts, one rear axle housing and a couple SS 409 Chevy application clutches back in the 1980's, thinking that a death grip clutch was the way to go.
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Old 02-22-2017, 10:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 64nailhead View Post
Without trying to sound too ignorant, what exactly is the purpose of a 'clutch tamer'? Don't you want the clutch to hit hard? I understand that a hard hitting clutch makes it tough to drink your cup of Dunkachino in traffic, but your car doesn't look like a car that you're stopping for a fast food drink in. Is it a way of building some clutch slippage into your clutch operating system?

But I'll admit that I'm in for the discussion
ClutchTamer.com This might help you understand it better. I had to read this to get the picture.
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Old 02-22-2017, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big gear head View Post
How far from the clutch pedal pivot point should the stealth tamer be mounted?

Can you give me some dimensions on the universal kit so I can see if it will fit under my dash? I'll try to see how much room I have tomorrow and then get one of these coming so I can get it mounted. Right now the engine is out and being disassembled, the transmission is on the bench and the pinion is out of the rear end. Might as well take something apart inside the car too.

I was wondering how much heat would effect the consistency of the clutch tamer. I know that normal brakes fade when they get hot, and carbon brakes get better when they are hot. I didn't know how much different the clutch would react when it's hot or cold. Have you had much experience with the clutch that I'm using?
The stealth version has 3/4" dia threaded body and 3/4" stroke. The body is 3-1/2" long, the plunger adds another 3/4". Generally around 2-1/2" to 3" from the pivot if controlling at the pedal. You can also install it to control from the bellcrank if that location would make things easier.

When you are casually driving around, the ClutchTamer doesn't really do anything that you would notice. I've used organic, ceramic, DF and sintered iron discs personally. Cold vs hot hasn't been a problem, but i usually do a quick little burnout to clean the tires that puts a little heat in the clutch.

Lots of customers making 700-1000hp using twins, RST and RXT's are a pretty common choice. Quite a few triple disc customers in the 1100-1500hp range too. I've even got a few using carbon/carbon clutches, no problem with heat there either. One carbon/carbon customer did have a problem burning up discs before the ClutchTamer install, but that was due to him attempting to manually slip with his foot. Very hard to slip consistently with your foot, and when you've got a really lightweight assy there's just no room for errors. After he installed a ClutchTamer i haven't heard of any more problems with melted parts.

As long as you stay away from the really lite clutches that were designed primarily for road racing or circle track, heat typically won't be a problem.

Grant
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 64nailhead View Post
Without trying to sound too ignorant, what exactly is the purpose of a 'clutch tamer'? Don't you want the clutch to hit hard? I understand that a hard hitting clutch makes it tough to drink your cup of Dunkachino in traffic, but your car doesn't look like a car that you're stopping for a fast food drink in. Is it a way of building some clutch slippage into your clutch operating system?

But I'll admit that I'm in for the discussion
Jim;
ignorance shouldn't be seen as a negative - WILLFUL ignorance on the other hand...

If you haven't been exposed to it; how would you know? The reality is; as a transmission guy, I want to mitigate driveline shock. This saves my bacon and allows my transmission to BEND, not BREAK. Thats one of the reasons that our 26-spline input looks like a torsion bar, and isn't 9310 steel. I WANT it to give a little, and come back.
We had a customer who was in the same boat as you; refer to my post 32 (3rd pg) in Freddie's M23W thread. He wiped out everything behind the clutch LOL. But the clutch survived.

Grant and I both see things kind of the same way....give me JUST ENOUGH clutch to get the car down the track; if I overpower it, rattle the tires hard, etc. the clutch will let go as designed and save the driveline.

Its easy to sell "low pedal effort, grabs like a beartrap, rated for 1,000hp" and it makes sense at first blush. However, a lot of drivers report that these feel 'wooden' or 'numb' under their foot. With 700hp on tap, "stuff" hits the fan so quick; its hard to react fast enough, nevermind when you're getting no feedback. And then it grabs like a beartrap.... *boom*

That turbo 327 needs a 4spd....jus' sayin
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