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Old 06-21-2004, 03:38 PM
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Compression fittings on brake lines

The line that goes to the rear drum brakes on my t-bird has rusted out in on spot, so I'm going to patch in a new section. How dangerous is it to use compression fittings? I've heard its dangerous, but then again my brother's car is using them with no problems. I've never used a flaring tool before, but I do have experience with compression fittings.

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Old 06-21-2004, 04:11 PM
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Absolutely deadly. Don't even think of it. In fact, don't even think of patching a rusted brake line, replace the whole thing. Get a good double flaring tool and learn how to properly use it before attacking your car or take it to a pro. Your life depends on it.
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Old 06-21-2004, 06:00 PM
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Originally posted by willys36@aol.com
Absolutely deadly.
Amen to that!

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Old 06-21-2004, 06:14 PM
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You can get pre-flared brake lines, if you are leary of flaring your own.

Like Willys says, don't use the compression fittings.
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Old 06-21-2004, 06:39 PM
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DITTO..... Willys36.
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Old 06-23-2004, 01:18 AM
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ditto! one way ticket to deadville!(for you, or someone else!) also illegal, DOT see's that it's your ****! keep golfin' on the green side, replace the line!

sorry about the censor - my bad!
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Old 06-23-2004, 05:54 AM
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Compression fittings are a real nono in most states for brake lines. I have seen on drag and raod race cars the use of Swagelok or Hoke stainless fittings. These are really not compression fittings in the sense of the word like copper or brass plumbing fittings. The Swagelok and Hoke fittings are good to 10,000psi, far above any pressure the brake system generates.

Vince
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Old 06-23-2004, 12:54 PM
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Ditto on the replacement of the line. Compression fittings are only good for small water lines around the house, or for connecting mechanical gauges on your car.

Buy the pre-flared tubing at NAPA, and put a new piece in there. They sell it in various lengths up to 40". If you need a longer piece just join them together with brass inverted flare female connectors. You always need a double flared piece of steel tubing for brake lines, and the ones from NAPA are that way. If you buy un-flared tubing or cut a piece, you will need a double flare tubing kit to flare your own.

Good luck

Chev283
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Old 06-23-2004, 01:13 PM
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I would never attempt a repair on a brake line that had rusted through, you just don't know how pervasive the rust is, however, just on the question of using "compression fittings", I purchased a coupla Weatherhead "Ermeto" carbon steel "sleeve" fittings for my project at a brake supply store in Sacramento. I used part# 7305X3. I assume there are no legal or safety issues. You can check them out at...

http://hydraulics.eaton.com/products...o_Fittings.pdf
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Old 06-24-2004, 10:55 PM
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Well I ended up running lines with double flares, it wasn't too hard.
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Old 06-25-2004, 06:22 AM
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Good choice and good job getting it done. You won't regret it. Pretty cheap too without getting into that aircraft or A-N fitting stuff.

You might want to take a glance at the other brake lines on the car to make sure they aren't rusted also. Dot3 fluid (the regular brake fluid) retains moisture over time and could rust the lines from the inside-out. In addition if you're in a climate where they salt the roads, they will rust from the
outside-in also.

I switched over from Dot 3 fluid to Dot 5 fluid (the silicone stuff that costs $22/qt) on my street rod when I built the brake syystem from scratch. No problems and no rust since I first built the car in 1975. This is expensive to do since you have to flush the master and wheel cylinders and possibly replace them if the seals are bad. Not necessary on your ride.

Enjoy your ride.
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Old 09-25-2011, 02:53 PM
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compression fittings

If compression fittings are so deadly and illegal why does NAPA sell them? Wouldn't they be in quite a legal quagmire?
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Old 09-25-2011, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outerrealm
If compression fittings are so deadly and illegal why does NAPA sell them? Wouldn't they be in quite a legal quagmire?
That is an excellent question. They are not intended for high pressure applications and are sold for lower pressure applications.
That being said, a lot of people use them and I have not seen one fail in my 40 years of working on cars. I have seen a lot of poorly done flares leak after a short time. here in New England we see a lot of rotted lines, especially on GM products. If they would just use stainless at the factories it would be a non issue.
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Old 09-25-2011, 03:50 PM
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When NAPA or another auto parts store sell you a fitting, they don't know what your use is going to be. You can purchase the exact same fitting in Home Depot or Lowe's and again, they have no idea where it's being used. Will they work - sure. Are they safe - maybe. But - that brake system might have as high as 1000 or more psig during an emergency stop. Do you want to rely on, probably, a compromised braking system?

These old threads just keep reappearing

Dave W
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Old 09-25-2011, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irelands child
When NAPA or another auto parts store sell you a fitting, they don't know what your use is going to be. You can purchase the exact same fitting in Home Depot or Lowe's and again, they have no idea where it's being used. Will they work - sure. Are they safe - maybe. But - that brake system might have as high as 1000 or more psig during an emergency stop. Do you want to rely on, probably, a compromised braking system?

These old threads just keep reappearing

Dave W
Because the same issues keep coming up.

The biggest problem with using compression fittings on a brake system (other than the fact they're dangerous) is insurance. If an accident occurs and your insurance company finds out compression fittings were used on the brake system you'll be SOL. Won't even matter if the brakes were the cause of the accident or not.

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