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Old 12-17-2011, 06:58 PM
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Compressor/Cooling Rack Question

Today I took two 6' sections of 1" copper pipe (radiant heat) fin tube connected them together w/fittings, mounted vertically on the wall with a drop drain leg.
I am going to attach my compressor to this, it is for cooling the air during extended run times. My idea is to remove the copper tube that connects from the outlet of the pump to the storage tank and run a line from the pump outlet to the cooling rack then from the cooling rack, reconnect to the storage tank.
Alternative is to connect the rack to the outlet of the compressor storage tank. In my mind cooling the air before it goes into the tank would be preferred to cooling after it leaves the tank.

Does this sound like the way to go?

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Old 12-18-2011, 08:01 AM
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it would be better between the compressor and the tank
that way you will get less moisture in the tank I would think
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Old 12-18-2011, 09:13 AM
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Interesting idea, it should greatly reduce the water collected inside the tank. I have a set-up similar to that on my compressor but then mine was done because my tank is located quite a distance from the pump and just uses straight Copper pipe with two drop legs and a couple of lengths of hydraulic hose to connect it all together.
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Old 12-19-2011, 07:41 AM
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I'm not sure of the reasoning of what your doing, but the amount of water collected would still correlate with outside air humidity, tank pressure and volume . Pre- dry the intake air and you'll collect less water in the tank. What kind of temps are you seeing in your discharge air? Or maybe I'm full of poo.
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Old 12-19-2011, 04:42 PM
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I am cooling the air after it is compressed to reduce the amount of moisture that makes its way past my filter/separator and into the line. I am not sure how well it will work, after 1 cycle of filling the tank, there is little water in my trap.
I know it would be better to dry the air before it is compressed but that is a costly set up.
I got everything put together and connected to the compressor yesterday, the tank was empty, started it and filled the tank. By time the tank was full the fitting temp where the line connected to my rack was 128*, the temp at the outlet fitting was 75*
I picked up a blast cabinet this past week and I know my compressor will be getting a work out when the cabinet is in use.
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Old 12-19-2011, 06:28 PM
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looks good to me, every little bits gotta help
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Old 12-20-2011, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
after 1 cycle of filling the tank, there is little water in my trap.


Personally I think it's going to help a lot, if you collected any water at all after only one cycle then you have your collection points positioned properly. The most efficient dryer possible would collect only a very small amount in that short run period even with fairly high humidity so I think you are going to find that your efforts are going to be well worth the time and money spent.
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Old 12-20-2011, 08:04 AM
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now, you need a pull cord type drain so you can drain it quickly and easily, whenever you walk by
because if you are going to be running that compressor a lot in the future, its going to pulling out a ton of water
i use them on the bottom of my compressor tank and the systems drain legs that i cant get to easily
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
looks good to me, every little bits gotta help
Thanks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
now, you need a pull cord type drain so you can drain it quickly and easily, whenever you walk by
because if you are going to be running that compressor a lot in the future, its going to pulling out a ton of water
i use them on the bottom of my compressor tank and the systems drain legs that i cant get to easily
Pretty slick, I looked at your link, how long does it bleed before shutting off?
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
Personally I think it's going to help a lot, if you collected any water at all after only one cycle then you have your collection points positioned properly. The most efficient dryer possible would collect only a very small amount in that short run period even with fairly high humidity so I think you are going to find that your efforts are going to be well worth the time and money spent.
I was wondering about the amount collected, it dribbled very little. I will have to give it a workout and see what the results are.
You mention money spent, I was quite surprised how much 1" copper fittings run. I had the fin tube from a job, the misc. fittings, stand offs for the rack, and lines and fittings to connect it to the compressor ran me $120.
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
now, you need a pull cord type drain so you can drain it quickly and easily, whenever you walk by
i use them on the bottom of my compressor tank and the systems drain legs that i cant get to easily
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
Pretty slick, I looked at your link, how long does it bleed before shutting off?
they are just a spring loaded valve with a cord attached
so when you pull on the cord, they open up and drain the water out, until you let go and it closes

no bending over and twisting valves, just stand there and yank
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
they are just a spring loaded valve with a cord attached
so when you pull on the cord, they open up and drain the water out, until you let go and it closes

no bending over and twisting valves, just stand there and yank
Makes sense...I should have thought of that.
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Old 02-11-2012, 09:41 PM
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Leaving an update on my cooling rack for my compressor.
I have been using my blast cabinet a fair amount and I have to say I am pretty happy with the amount of water I am collecting in the drop leg of the rack vs. a very minimal amount coming out of the compressor storage tank. I am not seeing any moisture past my filter separator during extended run times.
I had posted before of my inlet and outlet temps during one cycle, I had a inlet temp of 128 vs. an outlet temp of 75, with extended running I am seeing inlet temps of 185 vs outlets of 78-80 degrees. This is with the garage being 70 degrees. I am getting my readings with a infrared temp gun at the inlet and outlet fittings.
One quirk that caught me by surprise a little was the first time the compressor shut down after filling the tank, the unloader valve has to bleed off the additional air in the rack.
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Old 02-12-2012, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
Today I took two 6' sections of 1" copper pipe (radiant heat) fin tube connected them together w/fittings, mounted vertically on the wall with a drop drain leg.
I am going to attach my compressor to this, it is for cooling the air during extended run times. My idea is to remove the copper tube that connects from the outlet of the pump to the storage tank and run a line from the pump outlet to the cooling rack then from the cooling rack, reconnect to the storage tank.
Alternative is to connect the rack to the outlet of the compressor storage tank. In my mind cooling the air before it goes into the tank would be preferred to cooling after it leaves the tank.

Does this sound like the way to go?
Very similiar to how I made my latest intercooler. 1 inch fin tube and a 20 inch box fan.

I temp'd it with red hose to confirm function.
It now has stainless braided hose.
I still need to make a decent frame work for it.

On a 72f day it was capable of returning the air to ambient temp before it entered the storage tank.

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Old 02-12-2012, 05:47 PM
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I really like these ideas guys

but I am just going to start calling my storage tank, a cooling tank instead

and now I have a cooler also,
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