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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2008, 07:16 PM
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Vince,
The label says "Assembled in Mexico".

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2008, 08:45 PM
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AO Smith is a pretty good motor, a heck of a lot better than an Emerson. That's not a bad price for a 5 HP motor of that type and although you may have searched around and found it a few dollars cheaper I doubt it would have been worth the hassle, you did all right.
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Old 12-30-2008, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
I have a 5hp Sanborn compressor that has served me well since I bought it new in 1989 or 90, so it's nearly 20 years old.

It's an 80 gallon vertical that is 18 scfm @ 100 psi and 16 scfm at 175 psi.
[...]
Is the tank 20 years old, too? I'd be getting a little nervous about rust and cracks in a pressure vessel that old.
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Old 12-30-2008, 11:35 AM
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Grouch, That's a REALLY good point and that thing should be hydro tested especially if it's to be used at 175 PSI. Tank explosions are rare but they do happen it is just that it usually just hits the local news if it even rates that so no one hears about it when it happens. A few areas of surface rust on the outside may be OK but not heavy rusting especially around any welded areas such as mounting feet and pump/motor mounts also drain the water from the tank and look for signs of heavy rust there, if the water is coming out rust colored each time it is drained that is a sure sign of heavy internal rust. If there has been ANY attempts to repair the tank by welding, either patching a hole or welding a crack, then the tank must be scrapped and should not be used under any circumstances.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2008, 01:09 PM
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Well guys, I wish someone would have brought it up for discussion before I sank $350 into it.

However, the compressor has been taken pretty good care of during it's life. I have drained it after using it hard most times but occasionally forgot.
I would say most times I drained it netted less than half a gallon of water. It has always had an oily rust color to the water however. (There is no rust on the outside of the tank what-so-ever.)
I don't think I want to go to the trouble of having it tested. I'll evaluate what to do when either the new motor or pump goes out.
Also, if it did blow, I don't think the chances would be high it wouldn't hurt anyone. I have a small dedicated room for it. (Well, I might put a stackable washer/dryer in there too down the road.) Anyway it is not in the main area and no one will be next to the compressor for very much time.

Tell me if you think I am taking a risk I shouldn't be taking.

Here's a pic:

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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2008, 03:06 PM
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You're probably ok given the maintenance and description given.

The plus for you regardless, is that you have your compressor walled off in a seperate room - If the tank were to fail you have some extra protection.

I think explosive failure is not as common as a rust hole or split caused by rust weakened metal.

If your tank ever does go out - you'd be better off just replacing the whole thing, a "blank" tank is 600+ and then you have to buy all the block-off's and fittings.
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Old 12-30-2008, 03:56 PM
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A tank that size with 175 PSI would level a good sized building! The two I have seen first hand were both about 40 gallon capacity and one blew a hole in the back wall of a garage big enough to drive a truck through and this thing was in an open area, if it had been enclosed it would have done even more damage. The other one happened outside and was mounted behind the cab of a DM 800 Mack truck when the tank ruptured with 175 PSI and it destroyed that cab, it ripped the top back like an open sardine can. Any truck shop can tell you how much damage an exploding tire can do and they have a heck of a lot less pressure and volume than an 80 gallon tank pressurized to 175 PSI so don't underestimate the damage a ruptured tank can do.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2008, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
A tank that size with 175 PSI would level a good sized building! The two I have seen first hand were both about 40 gallon capacity and one blew a hole in the back wall of a garage big enough to drive a truck through and this thing was in an open area, if it had been enclosed it would have done even more damage. The other one happened outside and was mounted behind the cab of a DM 800 Mack truck when the tank ruptured with 175 PSI and it destroyed that cab, it ripped the top back like an open sardine can. Any truck shop can tell you how much damage an exploding tire can do and they have a heck of a lot less pressure and volume than an 80 gallon tank pressurized to 175 PSI so don't underestimate the damage a ruptured tank can do.

Oldred,

Do you think I am OK though?
I don't want to take a risk but then again, it would probably be a big hassle for me to get the tank tested.
I bet there isn't a place in San Angelo that would do something like that. I would probably have to take it to Dallas or Houston.

Would you go with it as is if you were me?
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2008, 06:42 PM
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A note on an exploding compressor tank that did kill someone. The compressor tank cited in the link was 23 years old but not necessarily the reason for the failure.

I've always run the OEM approved oil and never thought about the scenerio described in this report.

Quote:
Discussion: The test results of a failure analysis laboratory concluded there were products of combustion in the air tank that were most likely caused by the wrong viscosity of oil being used in the air compressor. The oil in an air compressor serves two purposes. First is to lubricate the compressor as it operates and second, to help cool the compressor and the compressed air it produces. The oil must be of a certain type and viscosity in order to produce the desired results. Manufacturers of air tanks and compressors usually recommended what type of oil to be used in their product. When OEM oil is not used, studies have shown that the oil may leak past the seals and gaskets and form carbon deposits in the supply line. As the diameter of the supply line decreases because of the carbon deposits, the compressed air, which is already at a high temperature, will increase even more, to the point where it might be possible to ignite the carbon deposits. If this should happen, and a piece of ignited carbon gets into the air tank, it could cause an internal explosion. This type of explosion would vary in intensity based on the amount of oil vapor within the tank. Air tank relief valves are not designed for this type of activity, and the air tank could explode, causing severe damage and injury. Although this type of event is rare, it has happened in some businesses and industry throughout the country. The practical prevention measure to take to avoid such an incident is to maintain air compressor equipment in a safe operational condition and to use only the grade of oil recommended by the manufacturer.
http://www.cdc.gov/NIOSH/FACE/stateface/ca/05ca010.html
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2008, 06:51 PM
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It's interesting that in the photos, the insides of the tank didn't look rusty.
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Old 12-30-2008, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
It's interesting that in the photos, the insides of the tank didn't look rusty.
That one seems to have turned into a fuel-air bomb instead of rusting to the rupture point.

Are there any welding supply shops around you? They regularly pressure test welding gas tanks at high pressure. Maybe one of them would be willing to test an air tank at around 300 psi.

I think there are instruments for measuring wall thickness in boilers and pressure tanks.

At worst, you could look around local department stores and find a tank and compressor on sale -- one of those things where they couple a tiny motor and compressor to a big tank to catch suckers. That's what I had to do to get a tank for a reasonable price. The on-sale compressor was about half what a tank alone would cost, yet still carried the ASME certification.
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Old 12-30-2008, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo_The_Dog
A note on an exploding compressor tank that did kill someone. The compressor tank cited in the link was 23 years old but not necessarily the reason for the failure.

I've always run the OEM approved oil and never thought about the scenerio described in this report.



http://www.cdc.gov/NIOSH/FACE/stateface/ca/05ca010.html


I have heard of this type of failure being possible but that's the first documented case I have heard about. As for the two tanks I was talking about both were old and were indeed very rusty on the inside, I doubt if either was ever drained at all. Just looking at the metal it appeared that both started to fail where the mounting feet were welded on and on the one that exploded on that truck the rip went up then length wise instantly discharging the pressurized air through the rear window of the truck cab, on the one in the garage it was impossible to tell exactly where the failure started for certain but the bottom of the tank was thin and heavily pitted from the rust.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 12-30-2008, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
I don't want to take a risk but then again, it would probably be a big hassle for me to get the tank tested.

This is always a tough call but for sure having the tank tested is the safest way. Most of the time a tank failure is nothing more than simply springing a leak usually as a crack around a weld but sometimes as a small hole from rust through, either is reason to scrap the tank. Where your tank is located could also have a bearing on your decision but it must be remembered that regardless where it is a rupture would be very dangerous, as I said before a catastrophic tank failure is rare but it unfortunately does happen sometimes.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2008, 01:33 AM
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rodger1

Not that I'm trying to spend your hard earned money - but you've done such a top notch job building the shop - I think if you have any doubts at all about the safety of the tank it's probably time to invest in a completley new compressor setup.

I say go completey new because you'd still be running a very old compressor, with a new motor and tank - the compressor would then become the new "weak link" and be the next thing to replace - then you might as well bought new.

You can always keep the 350.00 motor as a backup or until you run across someone else that burned up their motor.

Food for thought anyway...
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2008, 08:44 AM
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I say stack sandbags around it to catch the frag and shrap just in case. lol. If there is that much concern about it, replace it. Nothing has an infinite service life and a $500-$1000 compressor is probably no comparison in price to the damage it could do to your home or even worse you or a family member. I think its probably unlikely, but so are plane crashes and getting struck by lightning.
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