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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2010, 05:26 PM
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They're about 6cc smaller as delivered (58cc nominal)- more in your case because they've been milled.

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Old 09-09-2010, 05:56 PM
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So I should get the gm .028 composite head gasket instead and yes them are the right heads
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Old 09-09-2010, 06:45 PM
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If that's the thickness you need for proper quench, you could use a Victor Reinz Nitroseal p/n 5746. The compressed thickness is 0.028", available from NAPA.

A couple from GM. I believe Bogie listed these in another thread:

GM p/n 10105117 multi-layered stainless steel gasket with a 4.1 opening, 0.028" thick, will handle some surface irregularities of the deck and head surfaces.

GM p/n 14096405- stainless over a graphite core, 0.028" thick.
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prettyboyced
So I should get the gm .028 composite head gasket instead and yes them are the right heads
There's two .028 gaskets at GM. 10105117 has stainless steel faces on both sides and 14096405 with stainless steel on one side and graphite on the other.The 117 is intended for marine applications but can be used on the street. The 405 is a composite on one side, I like the composite as it provides some shear movement in the gasket to allow for the different thermal movements of the cast iron block and aluminum head. I've had good luck with either.

10185054 is the factory L98 and ZZ4 gasket which is what the factory puts between 128 heads and cast iron blocks, but at .051 thick it kills any compression gain and reduces squish/quench an awful lot driving you to higher octane fuel against the power output your getting or a reduction in timing and the loss of power that goes with that. Good gasket when warranty life is your highest priority.

On assembly you've got to really watch all the hole line ups. Modern economics have all the gasket manufacturers trying to stretch gaskets over more engines. So most come with pretty big bores and damn little material between the cylinders, so you've really got to eyeball these things to be sure you'll have a compression and water tight fit.

Aluminum heads require a hardened washer under the bolt head. Otherwise the act of torquing the bolts will cause the underside of the head to gall the aluminum under it resulting in high torque readings way before the bolt is properly stretched. This results in leaks. A lube must be placed under the washer and the bolt head to insure proper torque readings as well.

Bolt holes in the block must be clean and the same goes for the bolt's threads. The bolt holes in the block must be sealed even when using factory Teflon coated bolts otherwise coolant will work up the threads and leak out. I find about the best stuff that seals the threads and provides proper lubrication of them for proper torque readings is plain old Plumbers Teflon Pipe Joint Paste. But always be careful to insure that the holes you put any lubricant and compound into are open on the bottom because if the hole is closed and excess oil or compound gets trapped between the bolt end and hole bottom, it will bust the casting when you pull torque on the fastener.

Bogie
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:09 PM
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So which headgasket should I get I have aluminum 128 58ccmilled down .010 and -18cc pistons 350 stock bore and block
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:11 PM
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So which headgasket should I get I have aluminum 128 58ccmilled down .010 and -18cc pistons 350 stock bore and block
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Old 09-10-2010, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prettyboyced
So which headgasket should I get I have aluminum 128 58ccmilled down .010 and -18cc pistons 350 stock bore and block
My compression calculator pegs your set up with a .028 gasket at 9.496 to 1 SCR; with the .051 gasket that drops to 9.008 to 1.

Aluminum heads should be able to tolerate the higher ratio which makes the .028 gaskets look attractive.

I prefer the stainless on one side and graphite faced on the other 14096405 for auto engines and the stainless on both sides 10105117 for marine use. Reason being that auto engines are run hotter and go through many heating and cooling cycles so the graphite face allows the head to move around relative to the lesser movement of the iron block, so the sealing proprieties are longer lived. For marine while the load on the engine is usually continuously higher these engines tend to run cooler and aren't thermally cycled as often while generally requiring sealing that is more corrosion resistant than automotive applications. But I've used both on automotive and marine engines and they worked just fine, so I'm probably over-engineering the situation, a common problem of my personality.

There are three things you need to deal with when you put aluminum heads on cast iron blocks. They originate in the greater chemical reactivity of aluminum so some protection needs to be provided that an all cast iron sandwich isn't concerned about; and the problem of thermally caused differing rates of expansion and contraction between aluminum and iron.

The stainless steel faces or graphite or Teflon works the corrosion issues by putting a material between the aluminum and cast iron that doesn't allow the transfer of electrons from one material to the other.

The build up of a sandwich of gasket material allows movement within the gasket to absorb the differing rates of expansion/contraction between the aluminum and iron without breaking the surface seal with either part. This also reduces whats called "fretting" or "brinelling" which are terms used to describe surface erosion of the one part being rubbed in tiny amounts by another. The sandwhich also allows better conformibility with the surfaces it mates against which is more tolerance for un-flat or un-smooth surfaces.

Bogie
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