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Old 10-10-2013, 09:40 PM
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Covering lead

Question again. I ran into lead. i was kind of expecting it. So, what if any thing,
can go over the lead? I have whipped it down as best I can with a rag while hot. But it is still tinned. I am thinking 2k primer and paint ok. Body filler, even glass bondo is a no go. Can I primer it then mud over the primer? Or I am stuck trying to grind off the tinning some how?

Is it normal for the replacement outer cowl to be just nasty to line up?
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:52 PM
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I always remove it just for my own piece of mind on restorations. I have seen too many cars with lead seams that have cracked to leave it. Usually runs right out with a little heat from a propane torch, of course good ventilation is a must and a mask probably wouldn't be a bad idea. If you do any grinding or sanding, keep in mind that you will be creating dust that could lead to health problems if proper protection is not used. If you decide to leave it, I think I remember reading that epoxy, then filler, then 2K, but you may want to check with the supplier you are using before you apply anything.

Kelly
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:09 PM
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I always wondered what a wire wheel on a drill when it is hot would do. I just
dont have the courage to burn myself. I will grind off as much as I can and then
hit with a skim coat of bondo glass. That last little tinning is just impossible to get off. I already whiped it when hot with rags

Thank you!
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
I always remove it just for my own piece of mind on restorations. I have seen too many cars with lead seams that have cracked to leave it. Usually runs right out with a little heat from a propane torch, of course good ventilation is a must and a mask probably wouldn't be a bad idea. If you do any grinding or sanding, keep in mind that you will be creating dust that could lead to health problems if proper protection is not used. If you decide to leave it, I think I remember reading that epoxy, then filler, then 2K, but you may want to check with the supplier you are using before you apply anything.

Kelly
ok carolinacustoms just gave you the best advise, remove it all or redo it 2 or 3 years later.
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Old 10-11-2013, 06:44 AM
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Craig, Kelly is right..the proper procedure is remove the lead, rough up the metal with 80 grit, clean the surface with Wax and grease remover, apply 2 medium wet coats of Epoxy, allow the Epoxy to set up at least 24 hours and apply your filler, work or level your filler and apply another two coats of Epoxy...Now you have the area sealed and repaired properly....and if you do it this way, as Killer said...you won't have to redo it in 2 or 3 years.

Ray
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Old 10-11-2013, 06:49 AM
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As far as "is it normal for the replacement outer cowl to be just nasty to line up?" Often yes...this depends on several things, the quality of the replacement part and if there has been any previous damage or repair required in that area. If there has been damage that has needed to be repaired, it's a good idea to use the cowl for lining up the metal when doing the repair...that way you can move things around to get proper fit and finish.

Ray
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Old 10-19-2013, 12:16 AM
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LOL........ yea yea. I know, another learning curve! LOL. I have the drivers side left. I am starting with the outer cowl by tacking it on First. As for the new parts fitting, well, they are close. The outer cowl was a dead fit! The rest, well, I am wishing I would have made my own and saved some money.

But darn it! My door fits NICE!! I did good. I only had that stupid door off and on the truck 50 times.

OK, thanks for the lead info! I will be getting to the cowl patch body work this weekend. I had to take the week off my project and get some
more power to the garage. I am going to need a 220 volt outlet for an air compressor when I get around to painting.
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Old 10-19-2013, 07:46 AM
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There's always a learning curve Craig. After a vehicle has been hit, no repair is the same, they are all different, when you have experience in doing repairs, they become similar. It's not uncommon to get a piece that you purchased or that you made to be put in and taken out many times, especially if it has some custom touch of one type or another. I'm working on a 1/4 tone truck...that Cab has been on the frame and off at least 20 times...and it's not done yet. In the beginning, it seems straight forward and you start with your game plan. Every time I think I'm close, the customer, God bless him, has a new idea that requires more fabrication...in the end, it's always all worth it. It's just the between times that take the longest and can be most frustrating....unfortunately, your in the between times...but....trust me, the times will get better....perseverance and patience.

Ray
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Old 10-19-2013, 10:51 AM
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I am starting to see that. There is no straight lines anywhere on this truck. Nothing to measure a true square. And yea, this truck was smacked real good at one time. Everytime I look I seem to find a *crack* in the metal from the
impact or a slight bend. But you know, once I adjusted my thoughts on the
time I need, took a look at what I have done so far, I am feeling kinda good about it!

One front cab corner left. The one that got smacked real good! I am kind of looking forward to it. I had no idea how far I push myself and make something nice to look at.
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Old 10-19-2013, 01:50 PM
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This video of a friend is right in there with the same dilema,, Some of your questions are answered in the comments under the video... ,
.




hope to have brought good news

Last edited by milo; 10-19-2013 at 01:59 PM.
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Old 10-20-2013, 10:26 PM
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Wish me luck!

I saved the best for the last! One corner left and cab is done! Drivers front.
And look what I found under the bondo and lead. The point of impact. I kinda knew it was there all along. Found this friday night. Said take a break. I had to finish my power upgrade to the garage and blow out my sprinklers for the winter. I also finished off welding up the passenger side corner. I needed the vise grips off the outer cowl anyway.

Did the Riders loose again this weekend? LOL
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Old 10-27-2013, 10:14 PM
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Old spray guns

So, as I am hanging doors like a mad man off and on this last bit, I noticed a strange spray pattern from the last guys paint job.

What kind of spray gun did they use? Was this a siphon spray gun? Hint, the door is laying on its latch side. Your seeing the bottom of the door. I think I know the answer.
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Old 10-27-2013, 11:58 PM
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looks like it was painted with a brush

Kelly
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Old 10-30-2013, 11:33 PM
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Ok, demo done. I had to take a break and rake leaves, winterize stuff and add
power to the garage. If I am going to be blasting clear coat I better get a compressor upgrade to 230v. Hence a sub panel. That and it was getting on
my nerves running a power cord to the outside plugs. My mission is to get the cab done ( I am on the last corner ) before Nov 11. Then take the cab off and
finish it in primer, and paint the fire wall!@!!@!
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Old 10-31-2013, 09:57 AM
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Are those 2X4's you've got stacked up in the second picture or is that Gold brick....I knew the economy in Saskatchewan was doing quite well Craig...but Gold brick...I never thought it was that good of an economy...LOL.

By spring time Craig, I'm sure your going to see a huge transformation...keep working a it my firend.

Ray
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