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Old 02-03-2010, 10:12 PM
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Crimping tool?

Hey you pros...........what crimping tools do you use? I need to get some quality tools and would welcome your suggestions. I usually will NOT buy HF type crap and prefer, when possible, to purchase tools not manufactured by communists.
Thank you for your help!
David

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Old 02-04-2010, 05:53 AM
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I use a crimper from Thomas and Betts, WT111M,...


...for like the last 10 or 15 years, the crimps it makes are amazing. I've tested them by clamping the terminal end in a vice and pulling on the wire, either the terminal end or the wire breaks, the crimps don't allow the wire to pull out.

This looks like a great one too: Thomas and Betts Ergo tools

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Old 02-04-2010, 07:45 AM
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hardshell crimper

If you are doing crimps that will go into a multi wire hard plastic connector you need to get the one with a locking rachet that you have to completely crimp before it will unlock so you can open the jaws. I think one place I worked at used AMP or MOLEX stuff/ I still usually do the belt and suspenders thing. more shrink tube and solder on everything except racheted connections. .
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Old 02-04-2010, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickracer
I use a crimper from Thomas and Betts, WT111M, for like the last 10 or 15 years, the crimps it makes are amazing.
I agree- that type tool (pliers) works Good.

I had the occasion to watch how wire was terminated at Bausch & Lomb. They used a very large electric/hydraulic behemoth that had all the various dies to do all their terminals.

Every so often, they would 'qualify' the terminals by "testing to yield", whereby they'd pull on it until something gave. The wires were not to pull out of the terminal, rather they were to break the wires- much as Rickracer was doing above.


Either of these tools will do a real good job, the ratcheting tool is for insulated terminals, the Klein will do either, plus cut. Problem is, both are rather expensive.


Alternatives w/good quality are shown to the left of the Klein. Those two are Gardner Bender (GB) and work just fine. The needle nose are obviously going to be multi-purpose. They take a firm squeeze on larger gage wire. The GB pair that are next to the Klein is just a bit shorter, but quite a bit less $$$.

Nowhere will you see those hated stamped steel stripper, crimper, cutter deals that are found in the bargain bins of hardware stores across the country. They suck for most jobs, and seem to do nothing right- never cut all the strands, the crimp is too large in one slot, too small in the next, etc. Junk, basically- IMHO.

Don't forget a decent quality wire stripper (shown at both ends, far left is a GB)- this is important because you don't want to damage or break any strands of automotive multi strand (DC current) wire. Plus they save a TON of time and frustration if you're up under a dash board, for instance. The tool on the far right is used as a stripper only, I don't use the crimpers.

I knew a guy that started his car ('78 T/A) on fire by using a Bic to soften the insulation in order to strip it, while under his dash. Had to laugh, fortunately it was more stink than real damage.
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Old 02-04-2010, 10:52 AM
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The T&Bs that Rickracer posted are the exact same pair I've been using for 20 years. I've heard all the "experts" say that only a racheting tool can do the job right. If you guys use the T&B style that's way good for me. I would like to purchase a proper tool for the larger wire sizes as I regularly use larger wires for grounds.
Thanks for all your suggestions...........I really appreciate the knowledge and willingness to help.
David
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Old 02-04-2010, 01:09 PM
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The nice thing about the ratchet crimper's is you get the same crimp every time. It does not matter how tired you are or if you are in a rush or what ever. I do this kind of work for a living and and not all crimps are easy to get to or you may be in an awkward position and that is where to ratchet crimper's are nice.

I use the T&B Comfort Crimp out of the STA-KON line you can get a set to do 18 - 10 (red, blue,yellow). And they have a crimper that will do 8-1 gage. These will cover most of what you are going to use working on cars. You can fiend them on Ebay used and save big. Well worth the time to look.
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Old 02-04-2010, 03:46 PM
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Crimpers

Hey DD, All the tools recommended here are good products. I have used about every different crimping tool imaginable through the years. (37 yrs. electrical). Ratchet type crimpers are not absolutely required to get a good crimp connection, but they do make a real pretty crimp that makes your work look alot better and the amount of compression is set. Manual squeeze type crimpers take practice to avoid under or over crimping (too little or too much compression). In the industrial field sometimes wire connectors and tools are ISO spec. Not all connectors are constructed the same, so to get a perfect crimp with a ratchet tool, you should use connectors and tools made by the same manufacturer. T&B connector(T&B tool) Burndy connector(Burndy tool). In the real world this is pretty much overkill. Do yourself a big favor and don't use junk connectors(steel/aluminum/foreign crap/parts store,etc) If you only use the good stuff(copper w/tin plating) T&B,Burndy,etc., you'll avoid issues. I'll focus on tools related to automotive use for this post. My personal tools that do the best work are as follows; manual squeeze tools wire gauges #22-10, T&B WT111M for uninsulated connectors only, T&B WT112M for insulated connectors. Ratchet tools for wire gauges #22-10, T&B ERG2002 for uninsulated connectors, T&B ERG2001 for insulated connectors. The only issue I've had with the rachet crimper is sometimes the insulated(red) connectors won't crimp fully on #22 or #20(foreign car radio wiring). On wiring above a #10, I use a Burndy MY29-3, its adjustable from #8 and larger, I think a 250mcm is max. Its great for new battery and power cables. If you do a Goggle image search with these part #s you can see what they look like. Oh, buy them used, cause they are expensive and watch out for rachet crimpers that won't stay closed, they are worn out or have been dropped from high places. In tight cramped spaces the ratchets are hard to use vs. the squeeze type. Hope this helps. olnolan
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:09 PM
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Olnolan sounds like you and I are in the same trade. I appreciate your recommendations and will look for the tools you list. I do like the idea of having the same amount of compression on each termination as NvrCrwUp pointed out and tight places can be difficult. I do only use the good stuff, T&B, Burndy, etc. I have quite a stock (thousands) of various terminals that I purchased from a suppliers overstock. I'll never use them all so if anyone needs some.......let me know.
Again I appreciate everyones input. I have been fairly certain all along that my crimps have been satisfactory but got the impression from articles and books that I was missing something.
David
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Old 02-05-2010, 04:46 PM
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Been an Electrician for 23 Years and for crimpping the T&B'S Rick Racer showed you are the same ones I have used all these years they are an excellant tool.
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Old 02-05-2010, 04:54 PM
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The stripper I use looks just like the G-B one Cobalt327 posted above, it's a Blue Point PWC 27, off the Snap-On truck.
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Old 02-05-2010, 07:40 PM
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these strippers
http://www.google.com/products/catal...d=0CB0Q8gIwBQ#

and these crimpers
http://www.service.kleintools.com/CG...B01064+PRD+ENG
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Old 02-06-2010, 12:10 AM
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Different Crimps

Okay I did some crimps for ya'll with photos. It might take me a while to get photos up.

The first group is ratchet, second is manual, third is manual, fourth is ratchet.

Then I flipped um so you can see the backside;



the second pic is first group ratchet, second manual, third manual, fourth ratchet.

Take your choice of tool, but these are pro quality with the different tools. Wish the pics was a little better. olnolan
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Old 02-06-2010, 02:35 PM
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I've always been partial to the indentation that the manual T&Bs provide. somehow I think it's mechanically stronger. Just me 2 cents
David
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Old 02-06-2010, 07:32 PM
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Me Too

Hey DD, There is something old school about the manual tools that make me know when its crimped tight enough. My hands are pretty crippled from the years of abuse. The ratchets are alot easier on my old fingers. I also have a deficit in my right ring and pinkie finger. I lost the use of my right arm & hand about ten years back and had to learn to use it all over again. My right grip is equal to my left grip now, but it used to be about 3-4 times stronger than the left. Here are more crimping tools that you and others may be interested in.---
for Weidmuller pin connectors for terminal strips


this is a set off Accel plug wire dies that I adapted to use in the ratchet tool.



these are for crimping the male/female computer plug pins with the tiny wire



this is a buchanan tool for crimping the barrels, they come in handy for trim out when you need to gang a bunch of neutrals or grounds together. Depending on the barrel size, you can get a bunch together with one connection. Crimps from four directions, hard as hell to squeeze, but when its crimped, its crimped.



I've got a few more somewhere, I've got multiple sets of tools, one at home, another on service truck, another at the business place, another in the motorhome, can't never find em all. When I can fully retire, they will be all in one place. olnolan
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Old 02-07-2010, 11:12 PM
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Klein or Betts are great crimpers.

For smaller red or blue butts, ect. I use Kleins automotive crimpers.

Bigger butts/crimps I use the red/black Betts style crimpers.

But then again, I'm an electrican

I also HATE CHINA CRAP!!!
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