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-   -   Designing New Garage (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/designing-new-garage-130979.html)

roger1 01-04-2008 09:28 PM

Designing New Garage
 
I planning on breaking ground on my new Garage/Shop in June 08.

I thought I would start a thread here and update it as the project progresses.

Right now I am in the design phase so comments and suggestions will be appreciated.

First, I am posting a picture of a gas station that is the inspiration of my design:

http://www.hotrodders.com/gallery/da...s_Station6.JPG

I am planning on a 24' X 48' building with a 19' X 14' drive through. It will have a 10ft. ceiling throughout and the garage doors will be 8' X 8' (Edited 1/6/08 to 9ft wide by 8 ft high)
Here is rough sketch of my plan:

http://www.hotrodders.com/gallery/da...LatestShop.jpg

Here is my floor plan so far:

http://www.hotrodders.com/gallery/da...tFloorPlan.jpg

The room on the east will be for my "Clean/Dirty" work area. Sanding, painting, etc. I will have no tools or furniture in that room so it can be cleaned out easily.
The 3 rooms in the back from left to right will be the bathroom, compressor & dust collector room and the beadblaster & parts washer room. The rest of the area will be the main work area.

66GMC 01-04-2008 10:09 PM

Nice ... :thumbup:

You must live on an acreage, or at least on a very large lot?

I had a heck of a time building a 24 x 34 in my back yard.
Check with your municipal government to find out their rules before going too far. :sweat:

Greengo 07 01-05-2008 12:09 AM

something i would do if i were building this garage would be,

instead of closing those two work rooms in completely, why not just have end walls and have them open to the floor, that would eliminate two doors and 14 feet of wall, and i wouldnt have your bathroom open to the shop along with a door to the outside,

speedydeedy 01-05-2008 06:00 AM

Great looking plan. Just remember ,It won't be big enough. When I built my shop I poured the slab then had a brick layer build a cinder block wall 3 blocks high which = 2 feet,then build on top with standard studs and you have a 10 foot ceiling. This keeps the wood off the ground for washing out shop with pressure washer and doesn't soak bottom plate, also fights termites. :thumbup:

F&J 01-05-2008 06:25 AM

Those old stations are great. Try to put some time into studying old pics on the web to get all the exterior trim details correct, like soffits, roof overhangs, and mouldings. A little thought and a very small extra amount of money can make it a real knockout.


The only thing I am concerned about is your choice of 8' wide doors. I guess it depends on the width of your cars, but I prefer a 9' minimum....but I know that might throw off the proportions of your style. I like 30's-40's style stations, and I'd be at a loss as to picking a garage door style.

I think your project is great...I hope you keep posting..
:cool:

cboy 01-05-2008 08:19 AM

Great looking plan.

Things to think about:

1) I don't know if you are in a cold part of Texas or not. But if you are I would strongly consider putting in in-floor hydroponic heating. It's the biggest mistake I made in my shop - not having it. I'm on my feet a LOT in shop throughout the winter and it gets pretty brutal. The rest of the shop is at 60...but the floor is ice cold. But then, maybe you need A/C more than you need heat.

2) Just be aware, when you put running water and a bathroom in your shop it will most likely bump it into a different category for tax purposes AND for insurance purposes. Both will be more costly than just a plain old garage. At least that's the way it is here in WI.

3) Before you decide on a final ceiling/roof height, think long and hard about a lift and the design requirements for that particular lift...and the vehicles you will be lifting. Some require a 12' clearance to function properly.

66GMC 01-05-2008 12:29 PM

Cboy's comment on the bathroom sparked another recollection for me.
According to local by-laws ... each building that has running water has to have it's OWN sewage line. In other words, I couldn't simply "tie it in" to the sewage line to the house.

A whole new line all the way from the back yard to the center of the street out front ... 100 feet or so ... was "guesstimated" to cost something ridiculous ... $10,000 +.

I thought "For that much I can just run into the house ..."

F&J's comment on the 8ft wide doors is bang-on too.
I put 12-footers on mine, and it still takes a little manuevering to swing in from the alley with my pickup truck (extended cab - short-box). Pickup trucks usually have some wide mirrors as well ... so unless you want to fold / un-fold mirrors ... you may want wider doors.

I am installing overhead infra-red heaters. Unless you are going to keep your garage heated all the time ... that in-floor heat would take a while to "ramp up". I see my garage / workshop as an "occasional" or "weekend" thing ... so I want to heat it only when I need it. I would expect that Texas would have a much shorter "heating season" than Alberta Canada, though.

SpeedyDeedy's "curb wall" idea is a good one, too. I had mine (only 6" high) cast and poured with the slab, and then built a 10-ft stud wall on top of that.

Pictures are in my jounal.

I am STILL waiting for my (9' x 12') garage doors.
The gas and electrical are roughed in, the infra-red heater is hung, siding and roofing are complete.

I still need to insulate and hang PLYWOOD interior walls ... I'm not using gyprock.

I'm also planning to mount my workbench on casters so that I can move it around as needed.

I had the contractor cast in some mounting holes in the concrete floor for 4 chain-pots ... for use in anchoring and pulling things with a cable or hydraulic "come-along".

I requested LOTS of electrical outlets ... one duplex receptacle about every 4 ft or so for a total of about 16. Two 220-volt as well. One for a compressor, and another for a mig welder.

2 ceiling fans to keep the air moving. Seeing as how infra-red heating is "line of sight" it might be a little chilly in the "shadows" and under the vehicles. The air movement will also help to keep the windows clear.

NEW INTERIORS 01-05-2008 01:01 PM

You sometime have to deal with the board of health,When you put running water,Don't know about where you are,But here you do. :confused:

roger1 01-05-2008 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEW INTERIORS
You sometime have to deal with the board of health,When you put running water,Don't know about where you are,But here you do. :confused:

Not here in Texas.
I am a Hydrologist, so I am an expert on this. I have three water wells on my 4 acre property. Two I use for the yard and one for the house. Don't have to deal with any kind health department at all for private wells in Texas.

roger1 01-05-2008 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 66GMC
Cboy's comment on the bathroom sparked another recollection for me.
According to local by-laws ... each building that has running water has to have it's OWN sewage line. In other words, I couldn't simply "tie it in" to the sewage line to the house.

A whole new line all the way from the back yard to the center of the street out front ... 100 feet or so ... was "guesstimated" to cost something ridiculous ... $10,000 +.
.

I live in the City of San Angelo and they don't have any requirement like that. However, the city sewer line on the side street of my property is closer to my new shop site and slightly downhill from it. Already talked to a plumber and he said it will be easy to tie in to the closer line and the city will have no problem with that. My plumber was estimating $700 or so.

NEW INTERIORS 01-05-2008 01:22 PM

Sounds good.We have to deal with those a** Holes. :thumbup:

roger1 01-05-2008 01:32 PM

Good thoughts. Thanks.

#1. Not too concerned with heating here in San Angelo, TX.
The winters are pretty mild. Matter of fact it is 78 degrees right now. I will be putting in A/C for the summer. I think I will build in a couple of heat/cool units. One for the main area and one for the clean room.

#2 As far as getting a permit in San Angelo, I just have to make them believe it is not going to be for living space.

#3 I have given this a lot of thought and decided if I ever get a lift it would be one of those low units that can be disassembled and moved out of the way. Don't need a high ceiling for one of those. I have a house attached 2 car garage already so I have enough vehicle storage.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cboy
Great looking plan.

Things to think about:

1) I don't know if you are in a cold part of Texas or not. But if you are I would strongly consider putting in in-floor hydroponic heating. It's the biggest mistake I made in my shop - not having it. I'm on my feet a LOT in shop throughout the winter and it gets pretty brutal. The rest of the shop is at 60...but the floor is ice cold. But then, maybe you need A/C more than you need heat.

2) Just be aware, when you put running water and a bathroom in your shop it will most likely bump it into a different category for tax purposes AND for insurance purposes. Both will be more costly than just a plain old garage. At least that's the way it is here in WI.

3) Before you decide on a final ceiling/roof height, think long and hard about a lift and the design requirements for that particular lift...and the vehicles you will be lifting. Some require a 12' clearance to function properly.


NEW INTERIORS 01-05-2008 01:34 PM

Where did you see that old gas station ? that's cool!!!

roger1 01-05-2008 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEW INTERIORS
Where did you see that old gas station ? that's cool!!!

I haven't seen that gas station. I found it on the net.
Here's the link:
Ambler's Texaco

Here's a drawing of another actual gas station in Gonzales, TX that I think is really cool. At first I thought about using this style, but I really didn't want to go with a flat roof.

http://pages.suddenlink.net/lt1/GasStation2a.jpg

roger1 01-05-2008 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 66GMC
Nice ... :thumbup:

You must live on an acreage, or at least on a very large lot?

I had a heck of a time building a 24 x 34 in my back yard.
Check with your municipal government to find out their rules before going too far. :sweat:


Already have checked with the city.
My total out-building square footage can be 1/2 of the square footage of the main house including the attached garage.
So, I have no problem there. Yes, my lot is 4.1 acres.


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