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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2010, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by sbchevfreak


I guess I must not know what I am talking about. The almighty ap says I am wrong, and since he knows all, I will stop with my information, as I must be incorrect. ap has spoken, so it must be.

I'm just saying that according to your definition sand is a lubricant. And many other things could be considered lubricants by your definition that most people would raise an eyebrow at.

You're free to define what you want as you want, but to me your definitions seem silly.

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2010, 01:16 PM
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Back in my industrial gas turbine days the #2 distillate (diesel fuel) operated units had what we called a flow divider. This was a piece of equipment that was used to take the fuel pump output and distribute it to the combustion chambers. There was no other lubrication but the fuel oil. We also had some other turbines that used light stuff like naphtha for fuel. There is no lubricity in this fuel, being closer to gasoline. These flow dividers had an external lube oil system as they would fail quite fast otherwise. Additionally, based on the vintage of the turbine, many of them had fuel pumps that were lubricated strictly by the diesel fuel (depending on the turbine size 20 to 90 gallons per MINUTE!!!!)

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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2010, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ap72
I'm just saying that according to your definition sand is a lubricant. And many other things could be considered lubricants by your definition that most people would raise an eyebrow at.

You're free to define what you want as you want, but to me your definitions seem silly.

Grab a dictionary. The definitions are RIGHT out of one.

You need to accept the fact that YOU can be wrong. It is not the end of the world, welcome to being just like the rest of us.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2010, 02:07 PM
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Diesel fuel is classified as an oil, it has lubricating properties at the boundary film stage. Gasoline does not, it has no lubricating properties in the boundary film stage because it is entirely made up of volatile hydrocarbons. Thats does not mean Diesel fuel does not contain hydrocarbon fractions that evaporate (volatility) easily to enhance ignition...it does. However it contains a high volume of non-volatile oils which do not evaporate which gives it boundary lubricating properties. In addition the flash point of the lubricating medium and viscosity dictates how it can be used, gasoline would be dangerous to use as a lubricating oil in a four stroke engine due to the temp range it would be exposed too.

Diesel fuel contains more carbon per pound than gasoline which gives it a higher specific energy content (BTU/Gallon) than gasoline which gives slightly more power for the same volume used. The higher compression ratio required to compression ignite diesel fuel creates more power for the same volume used just as raising the compression in your gasoline engine race car raises the power output. The weight of diesel fuel is higher than gasoline so the heat content is similar if you compare BTU/pound but fuel is consumed by volume not weight.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuel_efficiency

Any liquid can be a lubricant, but not all have boundary lubrication properties that prevent wear. Those hydrocarbon liquids that do are called oils, gasoline is not an oil and the non-volatile fractions in gasoline are poor boundary lubricants.

http://www.wetestit.com/Crude_101.htm
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