Difference in "latching" and "momentary" switches? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Electrical
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 03:54 PM
labreejr's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Park Forest,IL
Age: 35
Posts: 84
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Difference in "latching" and "momentary" switches?

I'm looking for a cleaner look in my 84 Cutlass, so I'm routing the switches for headlights, wipers, door locks and power windows to the center console. I'm looking at the push button switches from Autoloc with the led ring around them. They have 2 types.......latching and momentary. Whats the difference. From what I understand, the latching is the same as a back/forth-on/off rocker switch(correct me if I'm wrong). The momentary I'm ASSUMING issort of like the horn button, as in it operates the function as you're holding it but when you release it disables the function??

Thanx in advance for any info.....................

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 04:03 PM
eloc431962's Avatar
Evil Wicked Mean And Nasty
 
Last wiki edit: Pilot bearing and bushings
Last journal entry: roof repair
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: back in the garage.
Posts: 13,761
Wiki Edits: 37

Thanks: 50
Thanked 28 Times in 24 Posts
A latching switch stays down when pressed and a momentary switch doesn't.



Cole
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 04:09 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Jax Fl
Posts: 383
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 17
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by labreejr
I'm looking for a cleaner look in my 84 Cutlass, so I'm routing the switches for headlights, wipers, door locks and power windows to the center console. I'm looking at the push button switches from Autoloc with the led ring around them. They have 2 types.......latching and momentary. Whats the difference. From what I understand, the latching is the same as a back/forth-on/off rocker switch(correct me if I'm wrong). The momentary I'm ASSUMING issort of like the horn button, as in it operates the function as you're holding it but when you release it disables the function??

Thanx in advance for any info.....................
You got it right! You answered your own question. When you get it done post some pics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 04:24 PM
eloc431962's Avatar
Evil Wicked Mean And Nasty
 
Last wiki edit: Pilot bearing and bushings
Last journal entry: roof repair
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: back in the garage.
Posts: 13,761
Wiki Edits: 37

Thanks: 50
Thanked 28 Times in 24 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Kemp
You got it right! You answered your own question. When you get it done post some pics.
Right on Chris.


Cole
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 04:39 PM
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Wiring diagram 1953 Chevrolet
Last journal entry: Spare Tire Dent Removal
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: a little S/E of Nome
Posts: 793
Wiki Edits: 647

Thanks: 7
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
You also have to consider the "Fail Safe" of the switch. This means, when you cut the power off from the switch will the switch remain 'open' or 'closed'. Case in point; If you have a latching switch that activates a solenoid that keeps a trunk lid closed, what happens when the power is cut to the switch i.e. dead battery or cut battery cable? Does the switch 'Fail Safe' to the normally OPEN or CLOSED position? If your battery was in the trunk, you would want it to Fail Safe in the N.O. (open) position so that you could get in the trunk to service the battery, rather than the N.C. (closed) position where it could not be opened unless you had an outside release (mechanical release).

The choice is yours.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 04:49 PM
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Wiring diagram 1953 Chevrolet
Last journal entry: Spare Tire Dent Removal
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: a little S/E of Nome
Posts: 793
Wiki Edits: 647

Thanks: 7
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Further to the above, if you had a power antennae that you wanted to go down to keep the car clean (looks-wise), you would install a N.O. switch that would apply power to the switch to retract the antennae when the radio or ignition switch was cut off. And you would want the reverse affect when you turned ON the radio or ignition.

Not so confusing, now!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 04:51 PM
eloc431962's Avatar
Evil Wicked Mean And Nasty
 
Last wiki edit: Pilot bearing and bushings
Last journal entry: roof repair
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: back in the garage.
Posts: 13,761
Wiki Edits: 37

Thanks: 50
Thanked 28 Times in 24 Posts
alittle1 has made some very valid points here and you do really need to take all this into consideration. JMO


Cole
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 06:47 PM
vicrod's Avatar
life is a ride
 

Last journal entry: 2014
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Telford, PA
Age: 72
Posts: 1,360
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 63 Times in 59 Posts
The Autoloc term "latching" must be referring to a push ON, push OFF type of switch. This is actually a maintained type of switch like a toggle switch.
The momentary switch is exactly that. As long as you are pressing the button the circuit is made. Release the button the circuit opens.

vicrod
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 07:09 PM
labreejr's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Park Forest,IL
Age: 35
Posts: 84
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by alittle1
Further to the above, if you had a power antennae that you wanted to go down to keep the car clean (looks-wise), you would install a N.O. switch that would apply power to the switch to retract the antennae when the radio or ignition switch was cut off. And you would want the reverse affect when you turned ON the radio or ignition.

Not so confusing, now!

Just got confusing. I dont see them mention anything of N.O. or N.C. Or would I have to wire it that way. And I'm assuming I should want it "fail safe" considering the batteries are going in the trunk..........Thinking of putting a positive jumper under car some where or in a wheel well.

Kind of to the effect of electric fans coming on when the car is off to cool it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-19-2010, 09:19 PM
bubbahotep's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: NYC
Age: 42
Posts: 487
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Too much mixed info confusing you. lol

Switch are NOT the same as relays so a latching switch simply stays in the last position you left it in regardless of power. Like the headlight switches in old cars are latching, leave your headlights on too long and the battery dies. Wall switches for home lights are latching

Power window youd want momentary: windows go up or down only when held pressed.

Locks: Momentary type

Lights: latching so they stay on without finger holding em on all night

Call or email the sales people to confirm what you need. Lock switches would have many terminals because they reverse polarity to open or close the lock etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 10-22-2010, 05:39 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 1,764
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 4
Thanked 66 Times in 64 Posts
Both a toggle and a latching switch will keep the last setting, even if power is turned off. However, they are designed differently

A latching switch is usually a "push on", "push off" button, like you find on some foreign cars for the A/C compressor. Push it once to turn on, push it again to turn off. It has a spring and a latch built in to the switch.
A toggle switch uses a lever or paddle, and you simply move it up and down between positions. Some are On/Off, and others are On/Off/On, where you can feed two different accessories.
Single pole, single throw - simply on and off
Single pole, dual throw - on/off/on
Dual pole, single throw- on/off for two accessories (maybe left and right side lights)
Dual pole, dual throw - on/off/on for two power feeds (the dual gas tank switch on my truck uses this to switch both the gas gauge and the fuel tank solenoid at the same time)

Switches can also be designed to light up when turned on, or they may have a separate power feed for a backlight that is controlled by your dash lights.

If you are going to rewire your entire dash, make sure you separate the courtesy light circuit, because it works differently. The dash accessories are grounded all the time, and you switch power to them on and off. The dash lights are the opposite - they have 12 volts power all the time, and the door switches and the headlight switch (turn full left) will ground the circuit to make the lights come on.

Bruce
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-30-2010, 05:55 AM
EOD Guy's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Alabama
Posts: 2,145
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 156 Times in 144 Posts
Basicly the above posts are correct, but what no one has addressed is the amount of amps that those small switches will handle, I have used those very switches, I get them in Stainless steel, while they will handle a door lock/unlock easily enough, they didn't like the window motor high amp draw so I ended up using a relay system and the switches controlling them. BTW a headlight is made up of one switch controlling various functions (several wires) not just two wires turning on the headlights. Those switches come in several vairiations.... push ON = a momentary on when you release it, it returns home (or OFF): push- ON-ON-OFF which means... push it 1/2 way it's a monentary, keep pushing 3/4 and it latches ON, push again and it releases the latch and returns home Those ring LED have seperate contacts that controll the LED eetc.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Electrical posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.