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Old 03-31-2012, 02:04 PM
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door damage

As someone who is a amateur with both body work , and welding I sure didn't like where this dent happened. Being on the edge of the door like it is, plus right where the ) body line is has me scratching my head.
I initially tried to pound it out somewhat , but some ones previous "work" on it has the metal very stiff and unyielding. This same person worked the metal so much that it actually tore in on spot.
That is what the welding is, my attempt to fill the tare.
My post about this on another forum was answered that it be cut out and a new patch put in ,which I'm sure is the correct way to go, I'm not sure my welding, or metal bending skills are up to it though.
Anyway here is a picture of my frustration
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Old 03-31-2012, 03:22 PM
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You'll never know if you don't try! If you don't do that what's Plan B?
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Old 03-31-2012, 03:44 PM
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To be done right yes should be cut out and then take a piece of tin and build a new patch panel for it.Then weld it in and fill and finish off.I just did a spot on a 2006 gmc door almost like this a couple weeks ago.That's just what I did to it. It was stretched beyond repair. Option 2 would be to sand blast and fill with lead. Option 3 would be to sand blast and fill with plastic. Not as good but at this point what do you do.
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Old 03-31-2012, 03:49 PM
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Do you have any access to that upper area that is in a little more than the rest? A stud gun may get it done but it depends on how strong that metal is.

There are all kinds of ways to get it done, welding a piece on and using it to pull is another way.

Here are is the list in order of "best" to "bestest" and so forth.

1. Cut it out and make a perfect patch, weld it in and metal finish it to perfection with no filler being used.

2. Same as above but not perfectly metal finished and using some filler.

3. Using a stud gun, or piece of metal to lightly weld to the lowest area and pull it out closer. Then re-weld over the poor welding to ensure the hole is all closed up. Fill the rest of the imperfections with a quality filler after epoxy priming the area.

4. Put a straight edge over it and see just how low we are talking. If that low spot is no more than an 1/8" with only a couple of spots going more like the deep pits in the welds, run a 36 grinder over it and fill it.

I am thinking in reality the #3 idea is the "bestest" for you.

Even the #4 would work and out last both of us. What are your expectations?

Brian
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Old 03-31-2012, 05:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
Do you have any access to that upper area that is in a little more than the rest? A stud gun may get it done but it depends on how strong that metal is.

There are all kinds of ways to get it done, welding a piece on and using it to pull is another way.

Here are is the list in order of "best" to "bestest" and so forth.

1. Cut it out and make a perfect patch, weld it in and metal finish it to perfection with no filler being used.

2. Same as above but not perfectly metal finished and using some filler.

3. Using a stud gun, or piece of metal to lightly weld to the lowest area and pull it out closer. Then re-weld over the poor welding to ensure the hole is all closed up. Fill the rest of the imperfections with a quality filler after epoxy priming the area.

4. Put a straight edge over it and see just how low we are talking. If that low spot is no more than an 1/8" with only a couple of spots going more like the deep pits in the welds, run a 36 grinder over it and fill it.

I am thinking in reality the #3 idea is the "bestest" for you.

Even the #4 would work and out last both of us. What are your expectations?

Brian
Lots of good advice guys thank you.
I guess realistically my expectations fall between #2 and #4
The previous hack job had a big hunk of perfectly sculpted bondo popping off the door.
I don't know if that happened because it was the edge or the door ,or too thick of bondo ,or both.
I would really like to avoid that happening again
If I do get this dent worked out some more , would fiberglass filler be a better option for filling?
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Old 03-31-2012, 06:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialman67
Lots of good advice guys thank you.
I guess realistically my expectations fall between #2 and #4
The previous hack job had a big hunk of perfectly sculpted bondo popping off the door.
I don't know if that happened because it was the edge or the door ,or too thick of bondo ,or both.
I would really like to avoid that happening again
If I do get this dent worked out some more , would fiberglass filler be a better option for filling?
"Everglass" is a short strand filler, that would be my choice if I was to fill something more than an 1/8". If it is applied correctly it isn't going to go anywhere.

Brian
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:04 PM
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I'd probably cut it out but if he doesn't know how to weld so well he might end up with the same thing. Agreed with the kitty hair. When I use the green to fill things where it's too much of a hassle to metalwork I'll break out the green and a file, and it's about the only time I break out the file.
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:25 AM
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I didn't say "Kitty hair" I said "Everglass" which has shorter strands. Kitty Hair or the even longer "Tiger hair" are for working with fiberglass only in my opinion. They are a pain in the butt to work with so I use them as a last resort with fiberglass. But honestly, Everglass will do just about anything you need even with glass. That is of course unless it's SMC then it's "Fibertech".

Brian
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Old 04-02-2012, 07:31 AM
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You couldn't have picked a better spot for a dent,all those lines and contours give it strength so warping it wont be an issue when you weld the tear...
work the lines first,a wide Masons chisel works best for punching out body lines nice and straight...,once the lines are straight the rest should be ez with a hammer and dolly ,try a 2" impact socket as a dolly (or the hammer) for the contour...If your going to cut anything cut the inner structure to gain better access then weld it back up when your done...
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Old 05-03-2012, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
I didn't say "Kitty hair" I said "Everglass" which has shorter strands. Kitty Hair or the even longer "Tiger hair" are for working with fiberglass only in my opinion. They are a pain in the butt to work with so I use them as a last resort with fiberglass. But honestly, Everglass will do just about anything you need even with glass. That is of course unless it's SMC then it's "Fibertech".

Brian
short strand IS kitty hair, bud.
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Old 05-06-2012, 05:49 PM
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around here the long strand is called kitty hair...or tiger hair
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Old 05-06-2012, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69
short strand IS kitty hair, bud.
Kitty hair is shorter than Tiger hair but Everglass is shorter still. It spreads more like regular filler, I find it much easier to use on something like this repair.

Brian

Tiger hair http://www.evercoat.com/productDetail.aspx?pID=39
"The original long fiber, fiberglass reinforced filler."

Kitty Hair http://www.evercoat.com/productDetail.aspx?pID=38
"Best known for its bridging capabilities in rebudiling shattered fiberglass and for reinforcing torn or rusted areas of sheet metal. Formulated with long strands of chopped fiberglass."

Everglass http://www.evercoat.com/productDetail.aspx?pID=36
"Short strand, fiberglass reinforced body filler. High strength, high build and waterproof which makes it excellent for repairing holes, rusted metal, body seams and shattered fiberglass. Contains ZNX-7® for superior adhesion and corrosion resistance to bare steel, galvanized steel and aluminum."

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Old 05-06-2012, 06:20 PM
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Personally I don't use Kitty or Tiger because if you really need it, it needs more structure work. You have probably never seen the Everglass, now that you have, give it a try, it's much easier to work with on something like this where you need some decent filling quality. It's all I use other than RAGE.

They also have an SMC version called "Fiber Tech"- http://www.evercoat.com/productDetail.aspx?pID=269

Fiber Tech™
An innovative all purpose repair compound formulated with Kevlar® and other high tech fibers. Its superior strength and adhesion is ideal for repairing SMC, rigid plastic body panels, i.e., ground effects, spoilers, running boards, fenders, hoods, etc. It also contains ZNX-7® for superior adhesion to steel, galvanized steel and aluminum.


Brian
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Old 05-07-2012, 07:26 AM
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I havent used any of that fiber glass filler in probably 20- 25 yrs .The last time I saw some I walked into a shop looking for a job and the guy was using tiger hair to fill in some tailights, he ground down the lights a little (they were still in the truck) then proceeded to fill everything with it,stuffing it into the cracks ...I guess everyone has their own way to shave tailights and door handles...but its not my way so I just turned around and walked out..He does do some real nice paint work so I was surprized...You never know whats under that pretty paint....None of that stuff has any business in a body shop,mabee someones garage that doesnt know much about the trade or a boat repair shop but not a body shop..The problem is when someone learns how to do something the wrong way they never seam to learn the right way.if it cant be done with bondo get a new door. If thats an old ford truck theres a ton of doors out there for under 50.00 ..Heck I just bought an 02 frontier door for 200.00 and I thought that was a bit high...
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Old 05-07-2012, 08:48 AM
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You are right, if you need it, you need more structure work. It works damn nice on fiberglass repairs. NOT structural but for filling, it works damn nice.

We are not talking about filling tail lamp holes here. We are talking using it instead of "bondo" on your usual spot where you need filling that you WOULD us "bondo".

In the original posters position it may be the way to go.

Brian
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