Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board

Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/)
-   Interior (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/interior/)
-   -   door panels (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/door-panels-230613.html)

sportcoupe 03-12-2013 10:07 AM

door panels
 
since I'm unemployed for a while do to downsized out work I plan on trying my hand at making new door panels for my 31 chevy coupe. I have fabric that matches the seat not sure what to use for the sub panel 1/8" lauan or heavy cardboard? any help would be appreciated. SC

DanTwoLakes 03-12-2013 12:28 PM

The best thing for any panels is PVC foamboard. 1/8" thick (3MM)
You can buy it at most sign shops. It goes by the brand names Sintra, Komatex, CelTec, and Palight. Check out this thread: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/door...al-145092.html, it will help you with your project.

BOBCRMAN@aol.com 03-12-2013 12:29 PM

Being old skool from the sixties upholsterer. I use 1/8" un tempered Masonite type hardboard for door panels. Mostly because I bought a huge quantity at auction years ago and it works. It glues up good and holds staples. Works/shapes well with basic wood tools. Can be easily sealed if used in high moisture situations.
I see that a lot of semi-ridged plastic sheets are used now.

DanTwoLakes 03-12-2013 02:59 PM

With all due respect to you , Bob, Masonite is the worst thing on the planet to use inside a car with all the temperature changes they go through. Masonite is an interior product which does not belong outside. Masonite is made from a slurry of sawdust and glue that is steamed and made into panels under very high pressure. Masonite is brittle, and breaks very easily. It is not waterproof, and no amount of sealing will make it that way. Even the oil impregnated stuff will take on water if it comes in contact with water. It also warps very easily. Some older cars had Masonite door panels, but they stopped using it because of it's many failings. Yes, it's cheap, but there's a reason it's cheap. Please do not use Masonite for your interior panels.

BOBCRMAN@aol.com 03-12-2013 03:20 PM

I said "Masonite type" so the reader could relate to the type of product. The stuff I have has held up for years. Did the inner panels of my 48 Ford, 57 Thames, T bucket with the stuff in early seventies and has done great thru all these years of Michigan weather.

I've sold sheets of the stuff to others and never had a complaint. Seals up well with a coat of ordinary exterior house paint.
Presently doing the door and interior panels of my Gasser with the material.. Will post pics soon.

BOBCRMAN@aol.com 03-12-2013 04:13 PM

Sorry, had to answer the phone. PS to above.

"With all due respect to you , Bob, Masonite is the worst thing on the planet to use inside a car with all the temperature changes they go through."

Auto manufacturers still use it in present vehicles. Ford, Chrysler and Honda for sure.. When Michigan was first hit by this recession. I contracted a job inspecting the raw panels as they were shipped from Indiana to a shop in Detroit. There they were covered with a fabric, by a heat press machine. Molded wood fiber door panels and interior cover panels. Sealed with a clear coating.

John long 03-12-2013 08:28 PM

I don't know exactly what you are using Bob. You say it is not masonite but is a masonite type material. Obviously it is not a product the OP can go to the store and ask for. Years ago I used 1/8 tempered masonite that is more water resistant than regular masonite but it is hard to find, expensive and still will deteriorate eventually.

The PVC board is 100% waterproof, formable, with a little heat, and economical. The last I bought was 22 dollars for 4 x 8 sheet. It makes no sense not to go with it, unless of course, someone already has whatever it is you've got. Below is a picture of one of my door panels that needed a little curve for my roadster. All it takes is a little heat from a heat gun as Dan said and you are done.

It sews easily and holds glue well. What more could you ask for?

John L

http://i1062.photobucket.com/albums/...psba05c46a.jpg

John long 03-12-2013 08:32 PM

Maybe this will shownthe curve better. :)

http://i1062.photobucket.com/albums/...r/8256ac02.jpg

BOBCRMAN@aol.com 03-12-2013 09:23 PM

Nice work!

Like I said old skool. What I was used to working with back in the sixties/seventies. It still works. Plos I have less than $1.00 per 4x6 sheet. Originally bought 250 sheets back in early seventies at an auction of a trim supplier that died, in Detroit.

John long 03-12-2013 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BOBCRMAN@aol.com (Post 1656213)
Nice work!

Like I said old skool. What I was used to working with back in the sixties/seventies. It still works. Plos I have less than $1.00 per 4x6 sheet. Originally bought 250 sheets back in early seventies at an auction of a trim supplier that died, in Detroit.

I would use it too Bob if I had it and had been pleased with the results. My purpose was only to point the OP toward a product that he could purchase locally that, as Dan said, is an excellent product.

John L

DanTwoLakes 03-12-2013 10:17 PM

I'm not talking about the Masonite type product you used in your cars 40 years ago. I'm talking about the Masonite the OP could find in his home improvement store today. All I am saying is that there are better choices out there than any Masonite type product for panel material. Being old school doesn't mean not changing with the times. They used to pad car seats with cotton, and cover the seat springs with burlap. Is that still happening? Car manufacturers sometimes make mistakes with things they decided to use. Just ask anybody who had a GM headliner in the 80's. Almost all of them failed because the glue failed and the headliner fabric separated from its foam backing.

sportcoupe 03-17-2013 11:44 AM

After reading the post I went out a bought a sheet of Sintra at the local sign shop for $40. Is it best to add a padding of some sort under the final covering first? What works best? It doesn't have to be thick maybe 1/8" to 1/4". Also i need carpet for the floors and trunk area black any ideas what durable and cheap. SC

S10xGN 03-17-2013 12:12 PM

What's the word on this stuff from PerfectFit.com?

Russ

DanTwoLakes 03-17-2013 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sportcoupe (Post 1657609)
After reading the post I went out a bought a sheet of Sintra at the local sign shop for $40. Is it best to add a padding of some sort under the final covering first? What works best? It doesn't have to be thick maybe 1/8" to 1/4". Also i need carpet for the floors and trunk area black any ideas what durable and cheap. SC

Yes, put some kind of padding over the Sintra and under the fabric. You can use anything you want to pad the panel, but you would generally use closed cell foam (brand name Volara) which is very firm. It comes in 1/8" and 1/4". Most auto upholstery supply stores have black closed loop automotive carpet or black trunk lining at a reasonable price. Here's one place: Trunklining

DanTwoLakes 03-17-2013 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by S10xGN (Post 1657617)
What's the word on this stuff from PerfectFit.com?

Russ

It's also called waterproof panel board, and comes in black also. It's basically just heavy cardboard, and isn't nearly as "waterproof" as they claim. It is also not nearly as good as PVC foamboard (Sintra).


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:05 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.