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Old 11-03-2011, 08:11 PM
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Drill Press for the Home Hobbyist - Brands, Features and Price Range Recommendations

Hi All,


Its time to buy a drill press. I will be using it for both metal and wood working. I'm not considering building a hot rod at this point, but who knows, maybe in the future I may get bitten by the bug.


I have read the threads from this forum. I have read cboy's recommendation in his book:

Quote:
"4. Drill press - essential. The heavier-duty, the better. I have a Craftsman circa 1978 which I've abused since it was new without a single problem (Photo 1-22). If you don't already own a good drill press, this is something you might be able to find secondhand and save some bucks. The bigger industrial machines hold up pretty well over time and can be a good investment providing they still run true, and there is no damage to the bearings or other working parts. If buying new, don't waste your money on the really cheap units from big box stores. Most of these are good for wood at best and will not provide satisfactory performance for the thick metals you will be drilling. I believe Craftsman is a good bet for the home shop, and with a 1 hp motor, these units, or other comparable brands, can be found for $600-$800."

- from "The Scratch-Built Hot Rod"

For the sake of both affordability and reliability, I am presently keeping my options open for both new and used. I'm leaning more towards used at this point.


My questions are:

- What are the best brands for new as well as used units, aside from Craftsman?( I am concerned about qualities of different brands, especially with changes in manufacturing processes and company ownerships. HF didn't get too many positive reviews in several threads).


- What would be considered a reasonable price range for both new and used? (cboy, I am assuming the price range you listed are for new units).


- Which features should I be on the look out for? (cboy recommends a 1 hp motor. Someone suggested that having lots of speeds as well as a floor stand makes a unit more versatile).


- For used units, what are the chances I may have to service them myself before using them? Are some brands easier to service and find parts for?


- Anything else you feel a first-time buyer should be aware of.




Thanks in advance!

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Old 11-03-2011, 08:44 PM
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Don't know about all of your questions, really not that hard. I bought this Taiwan made bench model about 18 yrs. ago and so far it has drilled everything up to 1/2" steel. It has a heavy cast iron head and says it's a 3/4 hp motor......who really knows. I think I've only used 2 or 3 different speeds, that's usually all I need, the main thing is having sharp drills and use plenty of oil when drilling....messy but works a lot better. PS, there's a chit load of 'em on ebay, you may not buy one but it will give you a good idea whats available........good hunting......Dave
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Old 11-03-2011, 09:51 PM
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Main thing to look for is the amount of runout of the quill..more runout means less accurate..

Sam
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Old 11-03-2011, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 327NUT
Don't know about all of your questions, really not that hard. I bought this Taiwan made bench model about 18 yrs. ago and so far it has drilled everything up to 1/2" steel. It has a heavy cast iron head and says it's a 3/4 hp motor......who really knows. I think I've only used 2 or 3 different speeds, that's usually all I need, the main thing is having sharp drills and use plenty of oil when drilling....messy but works a lot better. PS, there's a chit load of 'em on ebay, you may not buy one but it will give you a good idea whats available........good hunting......Dave

My Mom and step dad gave me one just like that.. About 18 years ago(maybe more)... That thing went through he** with me over them years... I even made it catch on fire(believe it or not).. (the motor)... And after the fire was out... I didn't touch it for a couple of days,,, Then I had to drill something... And I really didn't think this thing would even turn on.... Well it's still going strong today.... But I do want to get a full floor up right one day...

At this point.. I really don't think I can kill this thing.... Believe me !!!! I have been trying too... I want my new one... But this one has to break before the wife will let me..
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Old 11-03-2011, 10:35 PM
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Drill Press for the Home Hobbyist

I will agree with Sam & Dave. (sounds like an old musical group)

As to used drill presses, Delta, Powermatic, Canady-Otto, Buffalo Forge, Craftsman etc, would be good to look into. Size and power are some things to keep in mind as long as you are looking. Some of the old industrial drill presses will be good, even if real well used. They were built to last. Bearings are not too expensive and fairly easy to replace. For size, the "swing" (measured from the column to the center of the drill bit) is important. (a 22" drill measures 11" from column to bit center) Also, look for the longest quill travel you can get. (Depth of the holes you can drill in one stroke) 4" to 6" is better.

I would shy away from the newer imports, and even some of the new domestic names too. Older Taiwan or Japan imports are better, if not abused.

I own a 1978 Duracraft 22" swing floor drill press with 16 speeds (slower is better) and an industrial table for fluid coolant use. It's got a 1 hp 1ph motor that can be run on 115 or 230 volts. I even use an "x-y" fixture for light milling and an old Craftsman rotary table for circle drilling. It has a #3 Morse taper quill (for a demountable chuck) I mention these things about my drill press because they are features you will want to find in whatever you purchase.

Check out the www.owwm.org. The people there are finding and restoring some fantastic old North American and some European drills and will help you a lot with whatever old machine you might find. Just don't ask about Asian imports or appraisals.

Hope some of this helps you. Ask more if I can help more too.

Aloha, Tony
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Old 11-04-2011, 07:08 PM
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I would look for floor models only because you can do any thing with it you can do on a bench top model, but there is a lot you can not do on the bench top than can be done on the floor model. I like the multi speed selections. The more I learn the more I realize that proper speed for the size of the tool and the metallurgy of the median to be cut is extremely important for an efficient drilling operation and the life of your cutting tools.
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Old 11-05-2011, 04:53 AM
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Ok, go ahead and laugh, but I like my Buffalo Forge drill.



Seriously I do have a cheapie floor model (Robi) that I do a lot of stuff on and it has done pretty well over the years as long as you keep in mind its limitations.

Believe it or not though I do occasionally use the Buffalo unit for certain things, it can be belted up to a motor (a lot of them were designed for line shaft use or the option of using an electric motor). The old post drill turns at a lot slower speed than the slowest speed on floor drill which actually works a lot better for larger drill bits (1/2 and bigger) and hole saws, especially when working with stainless. Trees is absolutely correct about the drill speed.



I picked this one up off of E Bay and with shipping restoring it and adding a motor Im into it for about $125.

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Old 11-05-2011, 05:33 AM
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I have about the same one that 327 (Dave) has but from Harbor Freight and also from Taiwan though does have a square table Mine is 16 speed too, but that's only due to the pulley stack. As long as it has good belts and sharp tools, it will chew through anything - I've even had a 4" hole saw snatch a piece of oak out of my hands - once(I learned how to clamp it since ). Mine, when it arrived, had a wobbly chuck, possibly from shipping damage, but I replaced it with a $$$ JET and it's as straight as any I ever used - and I used big commercial drill presses as part of my early employment.

(They're probably Chinese now - but that's for another thread )

Dave W
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:29 AM
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The large drill presses from HF are notorious for the having the tables break off, it happened to a buddy of mine and nearly landed on his feet. I mentioned the incident here a couple of years ago and since then I have read of several other cases of this happening so it must be fairly common. I don't think the OP was considering anything from HF but since this could be a dangerous problem (the tables breaking) with those things I thought it worth mentioning.
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Old 11-07-2011, 08:00 PM
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Hey everyone,

First off, a big thanks to all of you for your helpful responses. I have never bought a drill press before and I've come to rely a lot on you guys for guidance before making such a purchase. (Replies to individual posts below.)


So, in summary you guys suggested:
Brands:
- Older Taiwanese units
- Older Japanese units
- Older units in general
- Industrial drill presses
- Older Delta, Powermatic, Canady-Otto, Buffalo Forge, Craftsman, Duracraft.
- Avoid newer imports as well as some newer domestics
- Robi is good as long as limitations are considered
- Careful with HF units, especially if feet are important

Features:
- Multi speed - speeds are important for variety of material worked on - Floor model - allows one to do much than a bench-top model.
- Quill Travel - 4" to 6"
- Swing - I am assuming that 22" is ideal. Is that correct?

Check On:
- Quill Runout - More runout - less accuracy

Other Tips:
- Use sharp drills and oil.
- If you buy the Taiwanese, you may be stuck with it for life, even if it sets on fire.
- Check eBay for price range.
- For restoring older Norther American and European units, check out owwm.




Hey Dave,

Quote:
Originally Posted by 327NUT
Don't know about all of your questions, really not that hard. I bought this Taiwan made bench model about 18 yrs. ago and so far it has drilled everything up to 1/2" steel. It has a heavy cast iron head and says it's a 3/4 hp motor......who really knows. I think I've only used 2 or 3 different speeds, that's usually all I need, the main thing is having sharp drills and use plenty of oil when drilling....messy but works a lot better. PS, there's a chit load of 'em on ebay, you may not buy one but it will give you a good idea whats available........good hunting......Dave
Thanks, I appreciate the pictures of the one you have and how well it has worked out for you. I did ending up checking on eBay and the good ones are definitely pricier than the HF units.




Hey Sam,
Quote:
Originally Posted by OneMoreTime
Main thing to look for is the amount of runout of the quill..more runout means less accurate..

Sam
I had to look this one up as I was not familiar with what a quill is nor what a runout is and how to measure it. I ended up using the following website for more info: "Drill Press Measurements". Thanks for bring this up!




Hey Randy,
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEW INTERIORS
My Mom and step dad gave me one just like that.. About 18 years ago(maybe more)... That thing went through he** with me over them years... I even made it catch on fire(believe it or not).. (the motor)... And after the fire was out... I didn't touch it for a couple of days,,, Then I had to drill something... And I really didn't think this thing would even turn on.... Well it's still going strong today.... But I do want to get a full floor up right one day...

At this point.. I really don't think I can kill this thing.... Believe me !!!! I have been trying too... I want my new one... But this one has to break before the wife will let me..
Then I guess that's the one I need!




Hey Tony,
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldebrush
I will agree with Sam & Dave. (sounds like an old musical group)

As to used drill presses, Delta, Powermatic, Canady-Otto, Buffalo Forge, Craftsman etc, would be good to look into. Size and power are some things to keep in mind as long as you are looking. Some of the old industrial drill presses will be good, even if real well used. They were built to last. Bearings are not too expensive and fairly easy to replace. For size, the "swing" (measured from the column to the center of the drill bit) is important. (a 22" drill measures 11" from column to bit center) Also, look for the longest quill travel you can get. (Depth of the holes you can drill in one stroke) 4" to 6" is better.
Noted on the brands. That helps to narrow my list. I personally am more than happy to buy an older reliable unit. Aside from it being a worthwhile investment, I think it adds character to any garage or shop. Plus I am getting a bigger appreciation for bringing old things back to life. I definitely appreciate the heads up on swing and quill travel. I will keep the numerical recommendations in my mind as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldebrush
I would shy away from the newer imports, and even some of the new domestic names too. Older Taiwan or Japan imports are better, if not abused.
Ok, that's three votes for older Taiwanese units. I am definitely nervous about buying anything new or newer these days. Seems everything is designed to fail after a short while.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldebrush
I own a 1978 Duracraft 22" swing floor drill press with 16 speeds (slower is better) and an industrial table for fluid coolant use. It's got a 1 hp 1ph motor that can be run on 115 or 230 volts. I even use an "x-y" fixture for light milling and an old Craftsman rotary table for circle drilling. It has a #3 Morse taper quill (for a demountable chuck) I mention these things about my drill press because they are features you will want to find in whatever you purchase.
Hmmm, wasn't initially considering a milling set up, but hey,something to think about. How do you like yours overall?

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldebrush
Check out the www.owwm.org. The people there are finding and restoring some fantastic old North American and some European drills and will help you a lot with whatever old machine you might find. Just don't ask about Asian imports or appraisals.
Sweet, I will definitely give that site a look-see.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldebrush
Hope some of this helps you. Ask more if I can help more too.

Aloha, Tony
Thanks, I definitely appreciate it!




Hey trees,
Quote:
Originally Posted by trees
I would look for floor models only because you can do any thing with it you can do on a bench top model, but there is a lot you can not do on the bench top than can be done on the floor model. I like the multi speed selections. The more I learn the more I realize that proper speed for the size of the tool and the metallurgy of the median to be cut is extremely important for an efficient drilling operation and the life of your cutting tools.
Yes, the preference for floor models vs bench-top models comes up quite often. I am a little limited on space but might be able to work out a spot for a floor model. Thanks for bringing up the info on the multi-speed feature. My original purchase probably would've been a five-speed, bench-top from HF.




Hey plymouthhemi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1957plymouthhemi
Ok, go ahead and laugh, but I like my Buffalo Forge drill.



Seriously I do have a cheapie floor model (Robi) that I do a lot of stuff on and it has done pretty well over the years as long as you keep in mind its limitations.

Believe it or not though I do occasionally use the Buffalo unit for certain things, it can be belted up to a motor (a lot of them were designed for line shaft use or the option of using an electric motor). The old post drill turns at a lot slower speed than the slowest speed on floor drill which actually works a lot better for larger drill bits (1/2 and bigger) and hole saws, especially when working with stainless. Trees is absolutely correct about the drill speed.



I picked this one up off of E Bay and with shipping restoring it and adding a motor Im into it for about $125.
That looks awesome! I wouldn't mind playing with one of those (provided I know what I am doing). What are the limitation that you have run into on the Robi unit?




Hey Dave W,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irelands child
I have about the same one that 327 (Dave) has but from Harbor Freight and also from Taiwan though does have a square table Mine is 16 speed too, but that's only due to the pulley stack. As long as it has good belts and sharp tools, it will chew through anything - I've even had a 4" hole saw snatch a piece of oak out of my hands - once(I learned how to clamp it since ). Mine, when it arrived, had a wobbly chuck, possibly from shipping damage, but I replaced it with a $$$ JET and it's as straight as any I ever used - and I used big commercial drill presses as part of my early employment.

(They're probably Chinese now - but that's for another thread )

Dave W
Yeah, I saw the prices for the JET units... yikes. . So do you still have the HF unit, or did you get rid of it?




Hey oldred,
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
The large drill presses from HF are notorious for the having the tables break off, it happened to a buddy of mine and nearly landed on his feet. I mentioned the incident here a couple of years ago and since then I have read of several other cases of this happening so it must be fairly common. I don't think the OP was considering anything from HF but since this could be a dangerous problem (the tables breaking) with those things I thought it worth mentioning.
Yes, I saw your threads regarding the HF units and that's when I decided to go ahead post my questions. Otherwise, I was more than ready to buy the $59 cheapo. I like my feet.



Thanks guys! If you feel I've got something wrong, or there is something else to consider, please do post it. In the mean time, I'm gonna get on the hunt with this list.
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Old 11-08-2011, 12:33 AM
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You could just buy the HF one and wear steel toe boots around it.
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Old 11-08-2011, 03:41 AM
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"....That looks awesome! I wouldn't mind playing with one of those (provided I know what I am doing). What are the limitation that you have run into on the Robi unit?...."

The limitations I run into on the Robi are that the slowest speed is not really slow enough for some jobs (large bits and hole saws) and that I should have stepped up to the larger size for a more powerful motor. I can still get the holes drilled it just takes a little more patience.

I actually bought the old Buffalo Forge unit to restore and use as a display piece but it filled the speed and power gap so nicely it gets used on a regular basis.

Both units have a bit of runnout so I wouldn't consider either precision but for what they are used for they are more than adaquite.
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Old 11-16-2011, 08:00 PM
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I have two presses: 1 ryobi bought new- tabletop- 100 bucks.
press#2 I scored at a yardsale -floor standing- craftsman- 40 bucks

they have been awesome
rick
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Old 11-16-2011, 09:07 PM
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Walker Turner is another older US brand that's good. Quite a few of them around.

Another one is Avey. Excellent drill presses.

Clausing is another good one.

On Powermatic equipment, the older US stuff is identifiable by green paint while the newer imported ones are painted gold. Given a choice, I'd take the green ones, but Powermatic has done a good job of keeping the quality up on their imported metal and woodworking machines so I wouldn't pass up a good buy on a gold one.

The most common drill presses you're going to find, probably 9 of every 10, will be a 16" swing. The 20 and 22 inch ones are much more rare, and often have 3 phase motors. A morse taper spindle is ideal, but generally limited to the larger presses.

The larger ones usually have longer quill travel, but some of the higher quality 16" ones will have up to 6" of quill travel. The extra travel is really handy when you're drilling and then deburring with a countersink or similar tool. The difference in length between a drill and a csk will cause you to have to reposition the table vertically on the ones with a short quill stroke while the long stroke ones have travel to accomodate both long and short tools without raising or lowering the table.

If you plan to do much metal drilling with drills in the half inch and larger range, it'd be good to look for a drill with a lowest speed of around 200 rpm or so. Top speed is pretty much never a problem, as most all of them will run plenty fast for wood drilling.

I'd be very careful in attempting any milling with a drill press. Regardless of whether the press has a Jacobs taper or a Morse taper spindle, both are designed for strictly thrust loads and not for lateral loads. A lateral load can cause the chuck to come loose off the taper and drop while you're cutting, and that's not a fun situation.
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Old 11-16-2011, 10:22 PM
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Drill Press for the Home Hobbyist - Brands, Features and Price Range Recommendations

All very good info Tubetek. We've got a gold Powermatic 1200 vs floor drill press (one big monster, but soooo nice) where I help out part time. It beats my 22" hands down, but I can do well with my Taiwan drill.

As to doing milling on the press, I have a #3 morse taper for the chuck, and for some collets. I installed a 1/4" setscrew into the side of the quill about midway of the taper length. I have carefully ground a relief on the morse taper of the chuck arbor and the collets to match the setscrew. I have never had a slippage or dropout problem, but you are very correct if that was not done. Of course, I don't take hogging cuts either. Light and steady gets it done satisfactorily.

We have a vertcal mill at the workplace too, so any heavy work has to be done there. But I like the idea of being able to mill something at home too.

Aloha, Tony
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